Navajo-Churro sheep

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Brought into New Mexico's Rio Grande Valley by the Spanish explorers in the 16th Century, the Navajo-Churro sheep breed is North America's earliest domesticated farm animal.

Once numbering two million, the breed was dissipated by a federally-imposed interbreeding initiative and a government-mandated livestock reduction program. By the 1970s, only 450 Navajo-Churro sheep were left in the United States. The Navajo-Churro sheep's meat is lean with distinctive, sweet lamb flavor.

In addition to excellent meat production, these sheep provide abundant milk and have a highly desirable fleece. The sheep is hardy, living lightly on the land and requiring less water and grass than other breeds.

Showing page 3 of 7 for 42 listings

Shacktown Farmers' Market

  Yadkinville, NC

The Shacktown Farmers' Market (at Billet-Doux Farm) will open in May 2008. Come and shop for the freshest, locally-grown produce, baked goods, honey, herbs and more at our producer-only market..(more...)



Rio Milagro Farm

  silver city, NM

We are a small sustainable farm in the heart of the southwest desert high country on one of the last wild and scenic rivers in the United States. Our farm is in the upper Mimbres valley in the foothills of the Aldo Leopold and Gila wildness. (more...)


Red Lodge Farmer's Market

  Red Lodge, MT

The Red Lodge Farmer's Market is a growing and fun local market held in Downtown Red Lodge, Montana every Friday evening at Lions Park from mid July to September. 2011 will be our 8th year providing local foods! (more...)


Quintana Farms

  San Pablo, CO

We raise navajo-churro sheep and spin theirwool also have milk cows of aryshire descent we have free range chickens and grass fed beef also pastured pigs. We raise all of our animals at 8300 ft altitude and higher they water off of the traditional acequias. that are over 200 years old. (more...)


Quicksilver Farm

  Hollister, CA

Quicksilver Farm and School of Husbandry educates producers and consumers in responsible, sustainable agricultural practices. We celebrate the rich traditions and patterns of our rural past. We are privileged to be the stewards of our farms. We hold our land in trust for those who come after us. (more...)