Sunshine for Dinner

  (Fouke, Arkansas)
The Farmer's Market that comes to you.
[ Member listing ]

Summer Season 2014 - Sunshine for Dinner - The Farmer's Market that comes to you.

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Bring me some veggies!

Summertime is on the horizon. Just look at that gorgeous table full of delicious, healthy, locally grown fruits and vegetables! I'd love to ring your doorbell and hand you a bag like this. If you're in the Texarkana area and would like to be on our waiting list for Summer 2014 homegrown fruits and veggies and farm fresh eggs from our Hardworking Hens, either message us through Local Harvest, call Georgiaberry at 870-653-3062 or send us a message on our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/SunshineforDinner) to get signed up. $35/bag.


 
 

Call to be added to the list for summer veggies!

We have had a great season with our first late winter/early spring veggie sales, but we kept it limited to get a feel for how things would work. 

Soon it will be time to start up the summer veggie deliveries, full blast! Call to get on the waiting list - 870-653-3062, or send me an email through the local harvest contact page - or find us on Facebook and send us a message that way.

 https://www.facebook.com/SunshineforDinner

 Thanks!

Georgiaberry 

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On the menu this week: April 22, 2013

The last of the winter spinach - and a healthy crop of nutgrass :(
The last of the winter spinach - and a healthy crop of nutgrass :(

Well, this was it - the last 2013 late winter/early spring veggie delivery. We will take a few weeks off while warm weather crops are getting ready - then we will be calling subscribers to get going again for the summer delivery season!

One of my chores this week will be pulling the rest of this spinach row, harvesting the leaves, throwing the rest to the chickens - then waging war on the nutgrass so that bed can be planted for summer.

On the menu this week: April 22, 2013

Green Onions

Lettuce ‘Buttercrunch’ and ‘Parris Island Cos’

Spinach

Chard ‘Sunshine Mix’

Kale ‘Rainbow Lacinato’

Farm fresh eggs – double

Cilantro

 

 

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On the menu this week: April 15, 2013

Tomatoes growing! 'Spudakee' is similar to a Sunshine for Dinner favorite, 'Cherokee Purple'
Tomatoes growing! 'Spudakee' is similar to a Sunshine for Dinner favorite, 'Cherokee Purple'

We are approaching our last week of early spring veggie deliveries. We have harvested a lot of the variety that has been growing, like broccoli, cauliflower, and our super-early container grown new potatoes. Nothing left but leafy greens and as the days (and nights) warm up, these plants are rapidly going to seed.

So for this bag, our subscribers got double eggs and a big bunch of whatever leafy greens I could round up. In a few weeks, we will be starting the delivery schedule again. In the meantime, we will be pulling out old winter crops and putting in new summer crops, like tomatoes, squash, and peppers. And eggplant, and basil, and cucumbers, and beans, and.... so many possibilities!

On the menu this week: April 15, 2013

Green Onions

Lettuce ‘Parris Island Cos’

Spinach

Chard ‘Sunshine Mix’

Kale ‘Rainbow Lacinato’

Farm fresh eggs – double

Cilantro

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Recipe - Roasted Broccoli

2013-03-10 19.06.35
broccoli florets, cut and tossed with olive oil, lemon juice, garlic and salt - ready to go in the oven

 

Roasted Broccoli

Well, the printed version of this recipe that I slipped in the bag this week for my Sunshine for Dinner veggie subscribers has a major flaw, and for that I apologize. I managed to leave out one of the main ingredients - lemon juice. Whoops. Folks, please add in the juice of half a lemon when you are tossing the broccoli florets with the olive oil. It tastes amazing!

Here is the full, correct (I hope!) version of the recipe. This is pretty much straight up the same recipe that can be found on the site Simply Recipes - my favorite place online to find recipes.

INGREDIENTS

  • Fresh broccoli, cut into florets
  • Olive oil, 2-3 T
  • Minced garlic, 2-3 cloves
  • Juice of half a lemon
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Parmesan cheese

METHOD

1 Heat oven to 425F

Toss broccoli, olive oil, minced garlic, lemon juice, and a pinch of salt in a large bowl till evenly distributed.

Spread out evenly in a roasting pan. Roast in the oven for 15-18 minutes. Top with freshly ground pepper and a sprinkling of Parmesan cheese

2013-03-10 13.21.55

 

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On the menu this week: March 11, 2013

2013-03-10 13.19.48
gorgeous pink Italian lettuce 'Ciucca' growing in the Sunshine for Dinner high tunnel

 

First veggie delivery of 2013!

So amazing! Today is our first veggie delivery from our new high tunnel/hoop house - we picked some delicious and healthful veggies for our customers. If you haven't had a call from me about getting some veggies - don't panic! These early harvests will be limited until we get a better feel for how the crops will recover and how much we will be able to pick each week. I can't rely on the farmer's markets to make up the difference or to add variety, as there aren't many vendors selling right now. So everything in the bag needs to come from Sunshine for Dinner.  As the weather warms, the gardens will be growing faster and I will be able to add more families to my delivery list. So sooner or later, I will be calling.

 

chard
chard

 

March 11, 2013    What's in the bag this week?

Farm Fresh Eggs

Green Onions

Lettuce 'Red Sails'

Broccoli

Chard

Kale 'Rainbow Lacinato'

Bok Choy

Spinach

 

2013-03-10 13.23.33
bok choy


 

 

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What's growing for 2013?

 

What's growing for 2013? The Sunshine for Dinner high tunnel hoop house is planted with broccoli and cauliflower, radishes and green onion, mixed lettuces, bok choy and swiss chard.  Our hope and plan is to start veggie deliveries much earlier in the season, as soon as the eggs start coming again.  If you want to be added to the delivery list for 2013, please send your contact information (including a phone number) to georgiaberry(at)yahoo.com or call me at 870-653-3062. I will be calling people when it is time to start making veggie deliveries in the spring.


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Sourdough Starter from Scratch: Capturing the Wild Yeast

 

This is the time of year when I can look forward to baking again soon.  I don't bake much in the summer because it makes the house too hot, and I am limited to an itty bitty outdoor toaster oven.  Not so good for fussing over bread loaves.  So the cooler weather encouraged me to get a sourdough starter going, to be ready for the bread baking season to come.

Every few years I experiment with making a starter from scratch - catching the wild yeast and making it grow.  I have had some successes and some failures, but this time I have a very active culture.  Here is how I did it.

making a sourdough starter from scratch

 

To make a sourdough mother, you need:

  • Clean glass or enamel bowl
  • Clean spoon
  • Clean distowel
  • 2 cups good quality white flour (I use King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour)
  • 1 1/2 cups good water (I use well water, but you could use distilled water or purified bottled water - you don't want to use water that has been chlorinated, like what we call "city water."  If you wouldn't put it in your fishtank, don't put it in your starter.)
  • a couple of cups more flour and water on hand to feed the starter for the first week

On Day 1, you will mix your 2 cups flour and 1 1/2 cups water in the bowl, with the spoon, and cover with the dishtowel.  Leave it out on the counter in the kitchen.  That is all.  Seems simple, but you have just laid a Cunning Trap for some wild yeast.  If there is any wild yeast floating around in your kitchen (and there probably is), it will begin to grow in your yeast trap, also known as your bread and water mixture.  It may take a couple of days to show itself, or you may get lucky, like I did this time, and you may get a yeast culture growing rapidly right away.  In the picture above, the "mother" (in sourdough circles we call it a "mother" and refer to it as a "her," now that you are making your own, you can do the same) is only 12 hours old, but you can see the bubbling that indicates the yeast is growing, feeding and respiring.  Those bubbles are what make your bread rise.

On Day 2, you will feed "her" 1/3 cup flour and 1/4 cup water.  As shown above, this is a simple process of dump and stir.  You won't get her perfectly smooth, just a few swipes with a clean spoon to incorporate the flour and water is good enough; the yeast will do the rest.  If you see a clear fluid on top of the mother when you check it, that is fine, just stir it back in when you feed her.  The fluid is alcohol which is a result of the metabolism of yeast (wine or beer, anyone?) and acts as a natural preservative for your starter and adds flavor to your bread.

On Day 3, do the same.  Keep on doing this until you have reached Day 7.  At this point, you should use or discard some of the starter, and refrigerate the mother in a glass container (I am using a mason jar).

**I decided to refrigerate my starter on Day 3, due to its very active nature and the fact that it was already getting very flavorful/sour.  Use your own judgement, these are guidelines, not rules!

IF you see any kind of mold or pinkish fluid on your starter - it is no good!  Throw it out at once!  The lovely trap of flour and water is desirable to many microorganisms, but the only one that we want to catch is the wild bread yeast.  You may unwittingly catch some other kind.  Just throw it out and try again with fresh and very clean bowl, spoon, and towel.

Wild Sourdough Starter Links

Here are some good resources for reading about making a starter from scratch, but I encourage you to go ahead and try it.  You can read and read about this kind of process, and look at various methods and ingredients, but in the end, you just have to try it for yourself.

My guidelines above are based on the instructions found at "Bread the Mary Jane Way."  I love how her site expresses the joy of making an elemental baking substance out of thin air, as it were!

My first experience with setting a Cunning Trap for the wild yeast living in my house came from the encouragement found in my dear old battered King Arthur Flour 200th Anniversary Cookbook.  They have quite a bit of that book online and here is the part about the starter.

There are very detailed instructions and lots of pictures here on the Wild Yeast Blog.

Soon I will tell you what to do with that starter once you have made it...

 
 

On the menu - July 11, 2011


Tomatoes

Charentais melon or cantaloupe

Yard-long Asian green beans – purple and green OR red cabbage

Cherry Tomatoes ‘Black Cherry,’ ‘Gold Nugget’ etc.

Farm fresh eggs

Apple ’Granny Smith’

Bell Pepper, Jalapeno, Hungarian Wax Pepper (hot), and Cayenne

Potatoes

Cucumber

Onion

 

The following passage is attributed to the 17th century French poet Antoine Girard de Saint-Amant, in reference to the Chanterais Melon.  

 

This melon is firm to the centre, with few seeds like grains of gold*. It is better than the beloved apricot, better than strawberries and cream, better than the Holy pear of Tours or the sweet green fig. Even the muscat grape I love is bitterness and muck compared to this divine melon.
O sweet grassy snake ,crawling on a green bed. It is Apollo's masterpiece. The brothels of Rouen will be free of the pox... tobacco smokers will have white teeth... I will forget my love's favours before I forget you-
O fleur de tous les fruits! O ravisant MELON!

Must be a good melon!

 

 

 

Hot and Dry Growing Conditions

 

The garden is suffering. Too hot. Too dry. I still have (or can get) enough produce to fill my orders, but I am not adding any new subscribers – they are all going on a waiting list. I may be bumping some of you to a standby list soon. If any of you are willing to volunteer to go to this status, let me know. Sometimes “veggie fatigue” starts in and you would like to take a break – this is a good time, and that might allow someone to remain on the list who has a real need or desire to keep getting the veggie deliveries. Call 870-653-3062 or send me an email at georgiaberry@yahoo.com.



The supply of veggies that are available will be decreasing for a while due to heat and drought conditions. In 2010, we made the last summer veggie delivery on July 19. I can already see a slight reduction in produce at the farmer’s markets, and I am having more and more difficulty in keeping enough moisture on my plants in certain areas of the garden – irrigation just does not entirely replace rain!



We are also seeing dramatically increased pressure from wildlife over this last week – deer and rabbits have virtually wiped out my stand of Asian Long-beans. These animals are suffering in the drought and looking for something fresh and well-hydrated to eat.



We will keep it up as long as possible...just letting you know what the trends are...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On the menu - June 13, 2011

red, yellow, and orange tomatoes

Tomatoes! ‘Taxi’ (Yellow), ‘Orange Blossom’ (orange), ‘Early Girl’ (red)

Sweet Corn ‘Incredible’

Peaches ‘PF7A’ and ‘Sentinel’ from Jamison Orchard, Nashville AR

Green beans ‘Roma”

Freshly dug potatoes ‘Red LaSota,’ ‘Yukon Gold,’ and ‘Kennebec’

Farm fresh eggs

Salsa Ingredients:

Jalapeno, Cayenne, and Hungarian Wax Pepper (hot)

Cilantro (got some at the farmer’s market!)

Garlic (might be the last of this from my garden…)

Onions

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Yellow Tomato Salsa!


Revisiting the Memorial Day Green Tomato Salsa Recipe, as now we have some ripe tomatoes.  Granted, they are 'Taxi,' which is not my favorite tomato by a long shot, but still.  Ripe tomatoes.

So here is the recipe,

Fresh from the Garden Green Yellow Tomato Salsa

A Sunshine For Dinner original recipe!


Green Yellow tomatoes – a couple

Garlic – plenty

Cilantro – a bit

Fresh peppers (Jalapeño is ripe now and perfect!!!) – how spicy do you like it?

Red onion – a few tablespoons

Lemon or lime juice – a few tablespoons till it tastes bright

Salt – to taste


Run it all through the food processor until coarsely blended, or chop it up with a knife and mix it in a bowl. Enjoy!


Delicious!  The salsa does not look as pretty with the yellow tomatoes as it does with the green.  The taste is great, though.  A bit more sweetness due to the ripe tomato.  I can't wait to keep trying this recipe with different varieties as the summer goes on - it will be different every time.  But what will I do for cilantro?  Mine is fading fast in this heat.  I bought some more seeds but they won't be ready overnight. Maybe I will be able to find some at the farmer's market.


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On the menu: June 6, 2011

First Ripe Tomatoes! ‘Taxi’ (Yellow when ripe)

Red Onions

Red Oakleaf Lettuce

Sweet Corn ‘Peaches and Cream’

Peaches from Jamison Orchard, Nashville AR

Green Tomatoes for Green Tomato Salsa

Jalapeno and Hungarian Wax Pepper (hot)

Cilantro

Spring Garlic

Cucumber

Farm fresh eggs

Ripe Tomatoes – ‘Taxi’‘Taxi’ is a yellow tomato, and the first to ripen in the garden this year.  If they seem a bit green, leave them out on the counter for a day or two and they will ripen up nicely.  We picked all the ripe tomatoes before yesterday evening’s windy rainstorm, or they would have all been knocked off the vines.  Let’s eat them up!  You could make yellow tomato salsa, same recipe...

Berries –  I am disappointed not to have any berries in the bag this week. The mid-season blackberry variety is not performing well this year.  Hopefully I can get some fruit off the next variety to ripen up.  I will do my best

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On the menu - May 30, 2011

Red Onions

Chard ‘Sunshine Mix’

Carrots

Blackberries!

Green Tomatoes

Cayenne and Hungarian Wax Pepper (hot)

Cilantro

Spring Garlic

Green Beans ‘Roma 2’

Herb Bouquet

Farm fresh eggs


Fresh from the Garden Green Tomato Salsa

A Sunshine For Dinner original recipe!

Perfect for a relaxed Memorial Day meal.

Green tomatoes – a couple

Garlic – plenty

Cilantro – a bit

Fresh peppers – how spicy do you like it?

Red onion – a few tablespoons

Lemon or lime juice – a few tablespoons till it tastes bright

Salt – to taste


Run it all through the food processor until coarsely blended, or chop it up with a knife and mix it in a bowl. Enjoy!


I think I put all you need in the bag – except the lemon or lime juice. What you really need here is an acid to balance the flavors, so if you need to, substitute some kind of light colored vinegar, no balsamic! The color will be very unappetizing!


Garlic: This is spring garlic – uncured, just freshly pulled from the soil. Very easy to peel, very delicious, and needs to be kept refrigerated. My garlic crop is not looking too good this year, but the taste of spring garlic makes up for the disappointment.


You could also make fried green tomatoes if the salsa is not for you!

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On the menu - May 23, 2011

Spring Onions

Chard ‘Sunshine Mix’

Carrots

Bok Choy

Radishes

New Potatoes

Spring Garlic

Herb Bouquet

Farm fresh eggs

 

Spring garlic:
Spring garlic is like the soft-shell crab stage of garlic.  The papery layers haven’t matured and cured yet into their customary dryness.  To enjoy this delicacy, just peel off the outer leathery layers and then chop up the entire head – no need for any more peeling!
Keep this garlic refrigerated, and use it up quick.  It is not for storing, it is for using!


Herb bouquet: 
What to do with this?  That is the question I ask myself each time I go in or out my front door, passing my overflowing herb garden!  
The best thing to do with it is drop it down into a small juice glass with water, and put it in your refrigerator.  Each time you open the door, the beautiful scent and appearance of the herbs will cheer and refresh you!
Pick them out of the bunch and use them as you like, when they wither, put them in the compost pile. 
Contents: parsley, rosemary, chives, sage, lavender blossom, lemon balm, dill 



Enjoy,
Georgiaberry


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On the menu - May 16, 2011

Spring Onions
Yellow Summer Squash
Red Russian Kale
Beets and Beet Greens
Radishes
Baby Romaine Lettuce
Parsley
Chives
Rosemary
Farm fresh eggs

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