Colvin Family Farm

  (Pikeville (serving Knoxville, Chattanooga, Franklin, Maryville, Farragut, And Crossville), Tennessee)
A Community Supported Agriculture
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This Week At Colvin Family Farm

Muddy Boots

 
It has begun—Mud Season. Thick mud, thin mud, sloppy mud, sticky mud, slick mud—mud of all types, loved by little boys, hated by moms (that is an understatement) tolerated by men (what can we do about it?)—Mud. 

I remember a book that my great aunt gave me on my tenth birthday entitled, “Good Old Days On The Farm”. It was a collection of hundreds of stories written by the depression era generation reminiscing on the “good old days, back on the farm”. I spent many hours reading those stories (often up in my favorite tree), and learned many lessons from it as many told about how the farm taught (or rather ingrained in them) character, perseverance, thriftiness, family love, and of course old fashioned neighborliness—doing unto others what you would have done unto you. As I was growing up on our farm, I could relate to many of the memories told about, some of my favorite stories were, “The Old Fashioned Washtub,” “Our Old Fordson Tractor,” “The Iron Pump,” and “1,250 Pounds of Ornery Mule,.” One that I can relate to right now is the one entitled, “Country Mud” by Gilbert C Kettelkamp. It talks about how anybody that grew up in a rural area would have little difficulty recalling their experiences with the stuff. It is a great story that talks of mud and how it shaped country life, although it was merely “tolerated” he says that now he looks back at mud as one of his favorite memories of his younger years. Although I cannot remember mud being the road surface as he could, and certainly haven’t yet decided that it is one of my “cherished memories,” I have had a lot of the same experiences with it! With all of the rain we’ve had lately and with the grass not growing this time of year, it is getting muddy all over the place. Since it gets the most traffic, the front yard seems to be the worst spot. It is conveniently situated right in front of the front door to our house, and yes that opens right into momma’s clean kitchen floor (at least it was clean before us boys walked through it). Coming up with creative ways to keep it cleaner, momma places the person who has been the most serious offender (at present myself) in charge of sweeping and mopping!

I hope that you have a wonderful Christmas!

 

Adam Colvin
Colvin Family Farm (CNG)
www.ColvinFamilyFarm.com

Knoxville CSA

A Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) serving in the Knoxville, and Maryville, TN area (share boxes, bags, baskets)

 

 
 

This Week At Colvin Family Farm

Late Fall View On Our Farm

 

 

 

 

 

This week we are pulling all of the carrots that successfully grew this Fall. We planted one-half of a bed in our garden (4 ft. by 100 ft.) early enough in September to make beautiful baby carrots from 2-4 inches long, but the 2 ½ more beds that we planted later in September didn’t grow enough root to overwinter (which was our original plan) so we made the decision to go ahead and clear the carrots out so that we could put a cover crop in their place. Although it is bothersome that that plan didn’t work out, it is yet another valuable lesson learned on our farm—next year we should be able to plant earlier so that we will have several beds of full sized carrots to overwinter, so that the following Spring we will have a lot of carrots starting on the first market day, rather then having to wait until the middle or last of June.

I keep thinking it will stop raining one of these days…we’ve had so much of it recently that it is turning the farm into a muddy mess. I wish that I could take a “rain check” on it and use it next Summer when we will invariably need it. The best amount for us would be 1 ½ to 2 inches each week—raining softly, and spread out over a few nights, but even though that rarely ever happens, if it isn’t too much, we usually have enough to pull the crops through.

It is a beautiful day, the sun (no it isn’t raining [whoopee!]) is up and starting to shine over the fields that are slowly turning green with our cover crop. It is going to be a beautiful day!

 
Check out our website for more pictures of the farm! 

 
Adam Colvin
Colvin Family Farm (CNG)
www.ColvinFamilyFarm.com

Knoxville CSA

 
 

This Week At Colvin Family Farm

Drizzling, cold, bleak, dreary--if you went by the weather, then you would think that we were having a terrible week. However there are things that bring cheer to a rainy day--Winter Rye cover crops are turning the fields green, lettuces and other greens are still growing in the greenhouse...It has been a slower week on the farm, but there is still plenty to do! We must keep the frost blankets covering the crops that are left--continually combating the wind that fight to lift them off. We must slog our way around the fields caring for the livestock, open and close the vents on the greenhouse to maintain a consistent temperature--on and on, the small things add up to a full day, then a full week. Just as November slipped by before we could fully realize that it was here, so will December. It is amazing how time flies! There are only three months till we start planting in the greenhouse, and it just gets busier from there! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

<P>Market Update: This week we will be able to bring up to market:

<P>Green & Red Lettuces, Fresh Carrots, Mixed Greens, Salad Mixes, Green Onions, Radishes, Arugula, Turnip Greens, Mustard Greens and Kale. Also look for our wooden toy stand! We will have all kinds of old-fashioned wooden toys, as well as other crafts! Hope to see you Saturday!

 

 Adam Colvin
Colvin Family Farm (CNG)
www.ColvinFamilyFarm.com


Knoxville CSA

 
 
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