Kyle Farms All Natural Lamb

  (Avon, New York)
A Day in the Life of an All Natural Lamb
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Shearing Pictures!

The first set of shearing pictures have come through!

 

Unfortunately this first set doesn't have any of our new shearing shed, but reports from the shearers and wool handlers give it glowing reviews!  Supposedly made a huge difference in shearer comfort/ease of shearing and was much easier on the sheep then previous temporary shearing sheds.

 

So with out further ado, Shearing 2010 at Kyle Farms!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please excuse the quality as they've all been shrunk down prior to my receiving them.  

 

Our two shearers are Aaron Loux of Aaron's Shearing Service (gentleman in the green shirt in the background), and a fellow shearer Alfie, who came over from Wales to help Aaron with shearing season (gentleman in the foreground of the pictures).

 

Information on Aaron's Shearing Service can be found at www.aaronshearing.com 

 
 

Spring is a time for decisions!

Well theres no doubting its spring at Kyle Farms!

 

Lots of new things going on here:

 

All the early spring lambs have been weaned and the ewes are about ready to go back out to green grass.

Since theres a lull in lambing until mid-May, everyone has been working on building a shearing shed for shearing the flock.  In previous years we have set up shearing in a local farmer's barn with temporary raceways, or outside on pasture using our movable chute and corral system.  Both of these depend on a lot of outside factors (barn availability, and the weather!)

So this year, two old run in shed barns that happen to be perfectly situated on the corner of two big pastures with a good sized fenced barn yard attached are being turned into a shearing shed for 2-3 shearers to work in.  

Shearing is slated to begin sometime in the next week, as soon as the new shed is completed.  With ewes lambing throughout the year, and marketing groups of lambs different times throughout the year, we end up shearing many times throughout the year to decrease the stress on young or pregnant animals, or to keep lambs clean before turning out in the early spring/late fall when it gets a bit muddy or the burdock gets bad.  

This equals multiple shearers, depending on the time of year as many of our shearers tend to migrate to other parts of the country or world to meet the seasons.

We're happy to use two main shearers, Tom Horton from Pennsylvania,  and Aaron Loux from Massachusetts (www.aaronshearing.com)

This year Aaron has a gentleman from Wales shearing with him, and they will be staying at Kyle Farms for the next month while shearing our flock and other flocks in Western NY.  

I'll keep you all updated with pictures of the new Shearing Shed and of the flock being shorn! 

 
 

Shearing Time!

Its that time of year again at Kyle Farms.  Even though the Rochester area is currently getting a lovely April snow, shearing time is still upon us.  Most of the early lambing ewes were shorn in January before they lambed and got to spend most of the winter inside.  Last week was catch up week and everyone who managed to avoid getting shorn with the rest of their groups in January was shorn so they'll have grown a bit of fleece before they get weaned and go out to pasture.  

The plan was to shear the main flock thats been out on pasture starting yesterday but with the lovely winter weather keeping its hold on April, we've had to hold off.  Shearing days are always busy for everyone working as the flock needs to be all brought together from their individual pastures and sorted, shorn, and taken back to their pastures without getting mixed up.  Shearing also lets us get a good look at each individual animal and assess their body condition score, trim any hooves that need attention and perform some internal parasite control if needed.  

Usually only one or two people are needed to help the shearer.  One person will catch the ewes, and bring them to the shearer, hopefully keeping the time between animals being sheared as short as possible.  The other is the wool handler and is responsible for sweeping up the shearers board and keeping the area clean, and collecting and skirting the fleece before it is bagged or baled.  

The atmosphere around shearing is always enjoyable as it brings many people together to work the flock and enjoy the weather! 

 

 
 
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