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Honey or a Honey-Sugar Blend? FDA's New Rules Will Help You Know!

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Pure honey or a sugar-blend? FDA's new rules will help answer that question

Pure honey or a sugar-blend?
On Tuesday, the FDA issued new draft guidelines that would require food companies to use the word “blend” on product labels when honey is mixed with sugar, corn syrup or other type of sweetener.

 

That inexpensive brand of honey you’ve been purchasing for years at your local grocery store may not be pure honey after all. More than likely, it’s a blend of honey and sugar or honey and corn syrup.

The same may be true for the “honey” in the honey-flavored bread or cereal or other processed foods you and your family eat.


That may soon change, however. On Tuesday, the FDA issued
 new draft guidelines that would require food companies to use the word “blend” on product labels when honey is mixed with sugar, corn syrup or other type of sweetener.That’s because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been very lenient with food manufacturers when it comes to honey-related labeling.

“That’s excellent news,” said Dan Whitney, a honey producer in Ottertail, Minn., and president of the nonprofit Minnesota Honey Producers Association, in a phone interview with MinnPost.

Much of the “honey” consumed in the United States is actually an imported syrup that contains some honey, but also other sweeteners, he said.

“The main culprit is China,” he added. “They will cut their honey with rice syrup or tapioca syrup.”

If they cut the honey with enough syrup, Whitney explained, the importing companies can avoid import duties. This enables U.S. food manufacturers to purchase the product at very low prices, which they then sell directly to consumers as “honey” or use in their processed “honey-flavored” foods.

“A lot of it probably winds up as bakery-grade or industrial-grade honey,” said Whitney.

But each year, Americans consume more than 400 million pounds of honey. So most of the honey making its way into our grocery stores is imported.

And much of that honey, if not most, is blended with another sweetener.

“If you do a little searching and look up ‘honey production’ from Thailand or Vietnam you find that all of a sudden they have thousands of metric tons to ship to us,” says Whitney. “Where is it coming from? I think they’re opening up the syrup tap.”

Bees have been dying and disappearing around the world, he points out. So, for a country to suddenly start producing huge amounts of honey from natural sources (bees) is unlikely.

Needed: a standard definition

The national American Honey Producers Association, along with the American Beekeeping Federation and several consumer groups, has long requested that the FDA issue a standard definition of honey. The government agency has declined to do that, but if these new guidelines are finalized — and companies abide by them — consumers will be better able to use labels to determine if they are buying pure honey or not.

In the meantime, Whitney recommends that consumers purchase locally harvested honey.

“The only way to really know that you’re getting 100 percent U.S. honey is to buy honey that is bottled by a local beekeeper,” he says.


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Pathogens, Parasites & Pesticides put Honeybees in Peril. Free Lecture!

Just wanted you to know that on WEDNESDAY, MAY 7th, 2014, there's a FREE LECTURE entitled Pathogens, Parasites & Pesticides put Honeybees in Peril. 

Lecture is hosted by the University of Miami, Main Campus. It's in Room 166, Cox Science Center.

Lecture begins at 7:00 PM, and is open to the public. 

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Honey for Spring Holidays!

I love Spring! The bees are buzzing, pollinating all of the fruits I love best, and it's also smack in the middle of one of the most bountiful honeyflows of the year. Right now we have a new medium amber Tropical Wildflower, and we just got our first harvest of Orange Blossom! We wait all year for that. So we're bottling like crazy. if you need some honey for Easter or Passover, we've got raw honey all ready for you. I like the Wildflower for baking, and sneaking into sauces like barbecue sauce or just about any sauce, frankly. And the Orange Blossom is a bit thicker. I put it over my yogurt, in delicately flavored herb teas, and in my salad dressings. I'll drizzle it over just about anything, quite frankly….

Oh, and when I make ham for Easter, I'll do the whole clove studded thing, and often mix honey, orange juice and mustard to rub over the whole ham. Makes a yummy glaze. (Can hardly wait!) 

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