Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
Herbal Information and Recipes
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Rosemary For Revitalization

Jessica Morgan, M.H.This woody shrub blooms in spectacular hues, from true blue to rosy blue, and one white-flowering variety. It blooms in spring and sometimes fall with a wonderful aroma that fills the air with a fragrance like sweet pine. Rosemary has a long history of medicinal use, in culinary cuisine, symbolic blessings, and aromatherapy in gardens around the world.

This amazing plant is often used a a tonic, but it also relaxes the nervous system, which helps ease anxiety, depression, and tension headaches. It's antispasmodic properties help to fight lingering bronchial infections and help improve breathing.

Rosemary tea is also an excellent herbal tea to drink for those recovering from an illness or surgery, and especially for seniors. This particular herb gently restores immunity and health. Because of its antioxidants, it prevents cell damage from free radicals. It has no side effects and can be taken regularly. This shrub is antiviral and antimicrobial which helps fight infections, as well as anti-inflammatory which eases inflammation.

Use rosemary tea to brighten your skin and overall glow. Its antiseptic value will improve the skin's ability to resist infection and helps clear up blemishes.

And of course we can forget about slenderness. Rosemary improves the digestion of fats, and keeps wastes from accumulating, including cellulite deposits. This herb is a great choice for weight loss because it enhances the flow of digestive juices.

The whole plant above the root is beneficial fresh or dried. You can find freshly dried Rosemary Leaf in my Local Harvest Store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

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Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Herb Garbling: Tedious But Exquisite

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Garbling certainly can be a tedious experience, but it is really quite enriching. I find that it has helped me get to know the plants I've collected even better. It's such a fun word to use too. I love when someone calls and asks what I'm doing, I love to reply, oh I'm just garbling some  Motherwart...or what ever herb I'm cleaning. Always makes them giggle, and it's always a fun way to start a conversation.

Oh, what is garbling you ask? Well garbling refers to the separation of that portion of the plant to be used from other parts of the plant, i.e. picking out wilted leaves, woody stems, stray grasses and other plants that came along with what you picked. This step is often done during and after the collection process. I always repeat this step after drying as well. Although there are machines that perform garbling, usually it is performed by hand.

Some may think it's silly that I dream about collecting herbs, but a day spent harvesting plants for use as herbal medicines is perhaps one of the most self-empowering things a person can do. For me, I love the whole process, wild harvesting or collecting cultivated herbs, cleaning, drying, then garbling. I love to sit and truly learn these plants.

When you take the time and effort to learn about the uses and virtues of a plant and how to identify it in its native habitat or how to cultivate it in a garden, or how to prepare it as medicine then you have given yourself the power of natural health.  Everyone should make use of the many safe and nurturing herbs found in nature such as Chickweed, Plantain, Dandelion, or Nettles as nourishing tonics. Pick a few weeds and practice the art of garbling, I guarantee you'll walk away with some appreciation for the little weeds in your garden. You can find freshly dried and garbled herbs in my Local Harvest Store.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Simple Old Lemon Peel Tea

Jessica Morgan, M.H.The simple lemon has gone beyond your ordinary glass of lemonade. Did you know lemon peel contains calcium, phosphorus, potassium, ascorbic acid and vitamin A, as well as volatile oil. It is diuretic, carminative, immuno-enhancing, and stomachic. This citrus serves as a tonic to the digestive system, immune system, and skin, while increasing circulation to extremities. Lemon peel is used to treat and prevent vitamin deficiencies, colds, flu, an scurvy as well as digestive or gastrointestinal problems by stimulating the appetite and encouraging the release of gastric juices to digest food.

The citrus bioflavonoid constituents of this herb help stabilize blood vessels, especially the capillaries, making it an ideal remedy for healing varicose veins, bloodshot eyes, phlebitis and hemorrhoids (especially when the lemon peel is used to make a tea).

According to researchers at the University of Arizona, lemon peel, a good source of calcium, potassium, and Vitamin A, is believed to reduce and prevent certain types of skin cancer. Drinking lemon peel tea by itself or in green tea was found to have more than a 70% reduced risk for skin cell carcinoma. Drinking one cup of hot lemon peel tea 30 minutes before meals several times a day will not only lower skin cancer risk; but also aid in digestion and help prevent stomach irritations.

So don't forget your daily cup of lemon peel tea- you won't regret it! Very convenient, just put one piece of dried lemon peel to a cup of boiling water. Add sugar or honey if you like. Great as iced tea too. Look for dried lemon peel here in my Local Harvest store.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Cornsilk and Its Medicinal Effect

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Corn silk (Zea mays) is a great herbal remedy for acute inflammation and irritation of the genito-urinary system, such as cystitis, urethritis and prostatitis. It is especially useful in treating inflammation caused by bacterial infection and its volatile oils neutralize fungi and yeast. It is particularly useful for calming bladder irritation and infection in children. Because this herb is a soothing and relaxing diuretic, corn silk clears toxins, catarrh, deposits and irritants out of the kidneys and bladder, plus it has a gentle antiseptic and healing action. The tea is also believed to diminish prostate inflammation and the accompanying pain when urinating.

By reducing fluid retention in the body, corn silk may help reduce blood pressure, and by aiding elimination of toxins and wastes it may relieve gout and arthritis, as well as act as a gentle detoxifying remedy for the system. 

Corn silk makes a good remedy for frequency of urination and bed wetting due to irritation or weakness of the urinary system, and has been used for urinary stones and gravel. Since corn silk is used as a kidney remedy and in the regulation of fluids, the herb is helpful in treating water retention associated with edema.

Corn silk tea  can be made by pouring 1 cup of boiling water over 2 teaspoons of dried corn silk. The mixture is covered and steeped for 10–15 minutes. The tea should be consumed three times daily.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Wild Chamomile Or Pineapple Weed- Call It What You Like

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

I spent last week roaming through the orchard and excitedly plucking this always awaited special herb, pineapple weed. This little weed like plant is closely related to the Chamomiles, Mayweeds, and other weedy daisies. All share the same kind of foliage, but pineapple weed doesn't have the white ray florets in its flower heads that chamomile is known for. 

Matricaria matricarioides or wild chamomile is a favorite of my children as they love to gather it on walks, bruise it then rub it on their skin providing an effective insect repellent.

I love pointing out this jewel of a plant to people. It's similar to chamomile, but sweeter and milder. Pineapple weed is often used for stomachaches and flatulence because of its ability to expel gas from the digestive tract, and is often used as a treatment for diarrhea. This soothing nervine helps to calm the nerves as well as combat insomnia. It is well known as an antispasmodic, carminative, galactogogue, sedative, and skin vermifuge.

I recommend making a weak tea for children with colds, colic, and for teething. Children love the taste and smell which is always a plus when working with kids. When applied externally as a wash, it acts to hinder itching and soothe skin and scalp sores.

Look for fresh dried- home grown pineapple weed in my local harvest store.  And as always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Easy Herbal Healing For Heartburn

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Heartburn is often associated with indigestion, bloating, and dyspepsia. Most people can take stomach-soothing herbs as teas, and will find that they are as effective and safer then over the counter remedies as well as conventional medicine. When treating indigestion or heartburn, herbs can not only help alleviate the uncomfortable feelings but correct it as well. Look to certain herbs that help to decrease the amount of acid being produced in the stomach, such as chamomile.You also may consider herbs that absorb excess stomach acid such as flax, fenugreek (seeds) and slippery elm.

There are three categories of herbs that are often used to treat heartburn and indigestion: bitters which are digestive stimulants, carminatives which are gas-relieving herbs, and demulcents which are soothing herbs.

When looking for a tea blend such as Heartburn Ease Tea,  look for herbs that improve the digestive process such as mint, chamomile, anise, caraway, coriander, and fennel. These can help the uncomfortable symptoms of heartburn and other stomach problems. Our tea blend is not only tasty but safe for pregnancy as well. Take care!

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

What Can Be Said Wrong About Alfalfa?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.What can be said wrong about Alfalfa? Silly question huh? But really, what can be said?

Alfalfa has been used as a medicinal plant for over 1,500 years. It truly is known as "The Father of all Foods". What other plant could demand such a title? Not many. Alfalfa is high in protein, calcium, Vitamins in the B group, C, D, E and K plus tons of other trace minerals and chlorophyll. Because the root system of alfalfa has the power to grow to magnanimous depths, it is able to store such wonderful properties from the soil that most other plants can't.

There are wild relatives that are found around the world, such as Medicago polymorpha and others, but it is M. sativa that is most known, especially for medicinal use. 

Alfalfa has rich green alternate leaves and  is one of the richest sources of dietary fiber and chlorophyll. Many people use Alfalfa for nutritional needs, since it's been known to stimulate the appetite. Very ill patients often need it because it is easily assimilated and full of nutrients. The ashes of the leaves are 99% pure calcium. Alfalfa detoxifies the body and alkalizes it, and aids in digestion.

With numerous estrogenic qualities, women over the years have used Alfalfa to relieve pain and symptoms associated with their period. This plant can help balance hormones and aids in removing excess water from the body due to its diuretic properties.

Alfalfa is used topically to help heal infections after surgery, or caused from bed sores. It can help in constipation, hemorrhoids and gastritis as well as help the body fights off infection.

Known to reduce cholesterol and aid in preventing heart disease and stroke, Alfalfa has been studied recently for its ability to help diabetic patients who do not respond well to insulin.

I like using alfalfa in capsule form, in tea, and of course in liquid chlorophyll form. 

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Herbs Used For Salt, Pepper, and Sugar Substitutes

Jessica Morgan, M.H. You may find yourself in a situation where you must cut back on your favorite seasonings or you may just want to explore the herbal culinary world. Either way, the clever use of herbs can replace some of our favorite culinary additions. 

I have spent tons of time and money tracking down exceptional salt and I know you salt lovers out there are aware that there really is no real substitute for salt, but, herbs can give that little bit of extra flavor that your looking for. Those on a salt-free diet can flavor their food deliciously by using such herbs as celery, summer savory, thyme, lovage, and marjoram. Try adding finely chopped lovage to unsalted butter- this can be used in your vegetable dishes or anywhere you like butter.

Basil, summer savory, thyme, marjoram, and nasturtium can help replace pepper in cooking for those who have digestive disturbances. I particularly like adding nasturtium leaves with other greens in my salads or tucked into omelets and turkey sandwiches.

Not only do these herbs make it possible to use sometimes half the usual quantity of sugar in a recipe, but they can also add delicious flavor. Some herbs often used as sugar substitutes in cooking are lemon balm, sweet cicely, angelica, and stevia. These herbs are particularly good in tart fruit pies made of red or black currents, rhubarb, gooseberry, plums, and of course tart apples. I like chopped sweet cicely added to lightly honey sweetened strawberries for a refreshing treat. Enjoy!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Rosemary Popcorn: A Twist On Our Favorite Snack

Jessica Morgan, M.H. I love popcorn. Homemade with real butter. Yum. There aren't a lot of snacks that can top a simple bowl of popcorn except for a simple bowl of popcorn with fresh rosemary or rosemary oil.

Most would agree that homemade popcorn is the only way to go. Microwave popcorn is oily and easily upsets the belly. Below is my favorite recipe for fresh homemade popcorn that you and your family will love.

 


  • 1 cup popcorn kernels
  • 1 tablespoons rosemary infused oil, recipe follows
  • Finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • Good salt to taste

I use a popcorn machine but pop your corn as usual. Toss the popcorn with the rosemary oil. Sprinkle with finely chopped fresh rosemary, salt to taste, and serve.

Rosemary Infused Oil:

  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 6 fresh rosemary sprigs (can substitute dried)

Combine the olive oil and rosemary in a small stainless steal saucepan. Cook over low heat for about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature. Transfer the sprigs to a 8-ounce bottle . Add the oil and seal the lid. Refrigerate for up to 1 month.

Yield: 1 cup    Enjoy!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 
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