Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
Herbal Information and Recipes
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Herbs For Men..We Didn't Forget About You

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Men seem to fall on the way side to women and children so often in herbal healing. But, from the heart to the prostate, ulcers , and even the common cold, herbs can play an important role on men's health. I have three men in my life; two are just babies, but none the less their health is very important to me. Knowing how to deal with and be prepared for, everyday "boy" complaints are skills I long to enhance. But, on with the men.

If you want to increase your health or suffer from symptoms associated with prostate, lowered libido, memory issues, palpitations, weight gain, depression and irritability- there are great herbs out there.

The following are some effective herbs commonly used in treating most problems experienced by men today, and are easily accessible.

Ashwangandha- beneficial for nervous tension, stress, anxiety, reduced sexual energy.

Hawthorn- cardiac tonic and vascular tonic, beneficial for treating high and low blood pressure, heart palpitations, angina, edema, and heart arrhythmia.

Motherwort- cardiac tonic and sedative, reduces palpitations, specific for tachycardia.

Gingko- improves mental stability, memory function, cardiac tonic, vascular tonic, peripheral vaso-dilator.

Oats- treats nervous system disorders, depression and anxiety, low sexual vitality, irritability, and urinary incontinence.

Kava-kava- helps reduce tension, anxiety, and stress.

Damiana- strengthens the reproductive systems, replenishes diminished sexual vitality, relaxant, antidepressant.

Licorice- beneficial for adrenal exhaustion, tiredness, and fatigue, digestive inflammation and ulcers.

Horsechestnut- vascular tonic, astringent.

Nettle- tonic for the reproductive system, liver disorders, urinary health, an edema.

Saw Palmetto- used to treat prostatitis, low energy, cystitis, bladder malfunctions, prostate cancer, and to build weight.

Hops- useful for hypertension and anxiety as well as insomnia.

Garlic, Ginger, and Cayenne- circulatory stimulants

If you looking for a herbal tea try our Men's Health Herbal Prostate Tea here in my Local Harvest Store. Our tea blend is highly nutritious and naturally benefits the maturing body. The perfect tea to support the prostate.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Sweet Lemon Balm......I'm In Love!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I have several lemon balm plants growing right outside my kitchen window, and I just love the wafting lemon scent that flows into the house. This easy to grow herb thrives in any sunny, well drained location. Both the foliage and the flowers are attractive in the garden and the small white flowers attract honeybees and other beneficial insects.  I love to add fresh leaves to salads, soups, herbal vinegars, and fish. A simple cup of lemon balm tea is delicious too. If using the fresh leaves for tea, the leaves lowest on the plant are the highest in essential oils. In pastures this plant increases the flow of cows' milk, and is excellent with marjoram after calving. You can grow your own lemon balm from seeds found here in my local harvest store.

Melissa officinalis is a mint with a distinctly lemony scent. Its botanical name Melissa is Greek for bee, as bees obtain large quantities of honey from the flowers. And  "balm" refers to balsam, the ancient world's most important sweet-smelling oils. For thousands of years herbalists used lemon balm to treat any kind of disorder of the central nervous system.

Lemon balm is an excellent carminative herb that relieves spasms of the digestive tract and is often used internally for indigestion, flatulent dyspepsia and chronic gastrointestinal disorders. I like to recommend combining lemon balm with hops or chamomile for digestive troubles.

Because of its antidepressant properties, lemon balm is a good choice for anxiety or depression, as the gentle sedative oils relieve tension and stress. For stress and tension it combines well with lavender and lime blossom. Balm also has a tonic effect on the heart and circulatory system, thus lowering blood pressure. If you looking for fresh dried herbs you can buy lemon balm leaf here in my local harvest store.

Herbalists often use lemon balm to treat viral infections of the skin, especially herpes, both genital herpes and cold sores. Although it wont eliminate the flare-ups, it helps relieve itching, and will help lesions heal. Lemon balm is useful, both medicinal and culinary and is a wonderful herb for just about anyone, including pregnant moms and children.

This beautifully fragrant herbs is one of my favorites and I guarantee it will be one of your favorites too!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Running Around Looking For Horehound

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Marrubrium vulgaris is one of the first non-native herbs I learned when I was working as field biologist for Cal State Stanislas to protect native species. I knew the plant as a cough remedy and a candy, but didn't have much experience recognizing the plant back then. In college as a horticulture student we studied landscaping plants rather than "wild" plants; which is truly where my heart was. But none the less, I learned alot.

 Horehound is a perennial weed and member of the mint family. It's commonly found in disturbed, low-elevation areas throughout California. One plant can produce thousands of seeds, become very dense quickly, and is resistant to trampling. It is often times found flourishing on roadsides. In an ornamental landscape, this aromatic herb will attract bees to your garden.

Horehound is an amazing plant and useful to say the least. It is an excellent pectoral remedy for cough and colds, bronchitis, and sore throats as well as helping with unwanted phlegm in the chest. Horehound tea alone is effective for the common cold but I like to mix it with marshmallow and licorice root and make a syrup.

Beyond being an expectorant, it is a bitter tonic, diuretic, resolvent, diaphoretic, and laxative. A warm cup of tea will produce perspiration and urine flow; helps with asthma, jaundice, and hoarseness. A cold infusion is a great tonic for dyspepsia, and the powdered leaves are used as a vermifuge. Taken in large doses, it is laxative and will expel worms.

For harvesting and storing: The first year, cut the foliage sparingly. The second year, harvest leaves when flower buds appear, chop and dry them, then store in airtight containers. If you don't know this herb, you should- it's easy to fall in love with.

As always, email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Are You Nervous About Hops? Well Don't Be!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Whether you're young or old, rich or poor, everyone experiences insomnia at one time or another. Why use over the counter sedatives when there is a safe alternative? So insomniacs, us herbalists have the answer - Hops. Hops or (Humulus lupulus) is commonly paired with chamomile, valerian, or lavender but easily holds its own as a natural relaxing sedative. The dried strobiles, can be made into teas, tinctures, capsules, and tablets. I prefer the tea as is takes effect much quicker.

 Hops is considered by herbalists to be one of the most calming and relaxing herbs known to mankind. Of course there is an array of relaxing herbs out there, but hops is proven to be one of the safest and most effective. I like to use hops internally for insomnia, nervous tension, anxiety and for those with irritable bowel syndrome. Hops is bitter, but tolerable; besides, your going to see results quickly.

Externally, hops works wonders on eczema, herpes and ulcers. A pillow stuffed with hops is said to be relaxing, and will calm nervous conditions as well. I like using it in the bath for total relaxation for myself and my kids. Try Ready To Relax to help relieve stress and tension.

 I have to admit thought, this vine is spectacular just growing. Just its presence relaxes me. I could not live with out all my hops vines. I wouldn't trade my other herbs for it - I just couldn't live without it! Everyone should should grow hops in their yard.

If your looking for fresh dried hops you can find it here in my Local Harvest Store.

 Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Beneficial Herbs for Menopause

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 "There is no more creative force in the world than the menopausal woman with zest"

-Margaret Mead

There are many wonderful herbs to help women comfortably transition into their menopausal years. Both Western and Chinese herbs are available which mimic the hormonal effects of both estrogen and progesterone within the body. These herbs "trick" the body into thinking it's getting the hormones. If you suffer from any of the associated symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, lowered libido, memory issues, vaginal dryness, palpitations, night sweats, weight gain, depression and irritability- there are great herbs out there.

Here is a list of some easily accessible herbs.

Black cohosh- beneficial for hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, vaginal dryness, prolapsed uterus and bladder, phytoestogen effects.

Motherwort- beneficial for palpitations, hot flashes, sloughing of the lining, phytoestogen effects.

False unicorn- beneficial for vaginal and uterine atrophy, and menstral irregularities.

Wild yam- beneficial for muscle and menstrual cramps, prevents bone loss, regulates PMS and depression.

Vitex-  benifical for water retention, depression, uterine fibroids, breast lumps, menstral flooding, and skin breakouts.

Dang gui- nourishes and build blood, hot flashes, irregular cycle, and vaginal dryness.

Nettles -helps with water retention, weight gain, strengthens bones (high in Calcium)

Oatstraw-  relieves tension, nervousness, insomnia, and builds bones (high in Calcium)

Black haw- beneficial for menstrual cramps and pain, flooding or excessive bleeding.

Kava kava- beneficial for tension, anxiety, and insomnia.

Ginseng- beneficial for tiredness, poor memory and concentration, anxiety, insomnia, and low libido.

Asparagus root- helps strengthens female hormones

Solomon's seal- builds reproduction secretions and aids vaginal dryness.

Epimedium- helps with hot flashes, night sweats, headaches, dizziness, and light headedness.

Along with taking herbs it is important maintain certain dietary guidelines to help alleviate menopause symptoms naturally. I like to suggest proper protein intake, whole grains and legumes, consuming lots of fresh locally grown vegetables and fruits as well as other phytoestrogenic and calcium rich food and herbs.

Are you looking for an all natural treatment for menopause? Look for my Women's Health Herbal Menopause Tea and Flash Calm Herbal Menopause Tea here in my Local Harvest Store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

 Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.





 
 

Plants Used As Dyes

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 My mother taught me how to sew when I was a little girl. To this day I still make a lot of my own clothes, quilts, and anything else I have time for. With my love of plants it just seemed natural that I learn to dye my own cloth and yarn.

Dyeing with plants isn't a new thing though, it's an ancient craft and the techniques are well established. Textiles have been livened up with natural plant and animal pigments for centuries. It is amazing to think that some of these are still around today like antique tapestries, brocades, and embroideries- still rich with color.

My goal isn't to teach you how to dye, just to inform those who save twigs, spent flowers, seeds and other plant stuff, that you can do more with them then toss them into the compost heap. Color is one of the most beautiful attributes of a plant and using dyes from them is a great way to "save" their colors when the seasons change, whether it's in cloth or a basket of natural yarns. And if done right, it is possible to create a full spectrum of colors.

Some of my favorite plants include black walnut, marigold, hollyhocks, purple basil, elderberries, coreopsis, goldenrod, ivy, nettle, onion, wallflower, oh and the list just goes on and on. Basically plants that grow around me. I have used lichen as well, but as a botanist with respect for these fragile plants, I have only collected certain species. With plants you can achieve some of the most beautiful natural colors in nature.

Gardeners always find room in their gardens to grow new plants that catch their attention. I hope you make some space for a little dye garden and enjoy the colors all year long.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

 Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Plain Plantain. Or Is It?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I love seeing little herb gardens of plantain growing in the cracks of people's driveways. These "weeds" are far too often plucked out (just like dandelions) but I have my hopes. Do you ever notice how Mother Nature plops down herbs in the most convenient spots. This mighty strong and stubborn herb isn't that tough by accident you know. Plantain, whether plucked, stomped, pulled or crushed, never seems to die; in fact, it's so resilient, it'll grow where nothing else will. To me- that's a trooper!

Plantain is defiantly one herb that I put at the top of my list as a great remedy for coughs, lung congestion, hoarseness and anything else where excessive mucus is a problem. This particular herb is a good substitute for slippery elm which is disappearing due to irresponsible wild crafting practices, commercial logging, and Dutch elm disease. You can make a simple tea or a syrup (I like to add fresh ginger to my plantain syrup as well) and use whenever a hacking cough starts. Buy fresh dried plantain here.

Plantago is also commonly used internally for diarrhea, cystitis, asthma, hay fever, hemorrhage, catarrh, and sinusitis. As well as externally for eye inflammations, shingles, and ulcers. I often use it to sooth the stings from nettles too.

As a wound healer, plantain is superior. In addition to coagulating blood, the tea or salve has been known to close up even the most stubborn sores. You can even wash skin eruptions and rashes in plain plantain tea as a natural aid. Fresh plantain has been shown to draw out insect poison before it can cause major discomfort.

If you lucky enough to find this "bothersome weed" in your yard (and I'm sure you might) you can also use the fresh leaves in salads; steam and eat the leaves like spinach - their really quite yummy. What ever you chose to do with your plantain, don't be surprised to know that it is one of the wisest weeds on the block! You can find plantain here in my Local Harvest Store

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Yarrow...A Local Favorite

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) belongs to the sunflower family and can be recognized by its highly segmented leaves (millefolium means "thousand leafed"), and the clusters of daisy-like white or lavender umbel shaped flowers at the top of the stalk. The entire plant is strongly aromatic and similar to mothballs ( as fresh or dried yarrow repels moths). This drought tolerant plant can easily be grown in most yards and responds best to soil that is poorly developed and well drained. It is frost hardy and can easily be grown from seed and/or division. It is a perfect addition to an ornamental bed or border, as well as the herb garden. Seeds require light for germination, so optimal germination occurs when planted no deeper than a quarter inch. Seeds also require a germination temperature of 65-75°F.  Yarrow is a weedy species and can become invasive so should be divided every other year, and planted 12 inches apart. You can find Yarrow Seeds here in my Local Harvest Store.


Yarrow is one of the best diaphoretic herbs and is a standard remedy for aiding the body with cold and flu symptoms as well as breaking fevers. I like mixing yarrow with elderflower and peppermint for an effective fever reducer for my family. Simple yarrow herb tea has also been used in the past for stimulating appetite, helping stomach cramps, flatulence, gastritis, enteritis, gallbladder and liver ailments and also aids internal hemorrhage - particularly of the lungs.

Externally, yarrow has been used for all sorts of external wounds and sores from chapped or broken skin to sore nipples and varicose veins. I include yarrow in my Sitting Pretty Sitz Bath because it is one of the best herbal antiseptic and hemostatic herbs that help stop bleeding and prevent infection in tears from child birth.

Although yarrow should not be used internally during pregnancy, it is otherwise a very safe herb and is a good first herb in the home apothecary for the beginning herbalist. You can find dried Yarrow Herb here in my Local Harvest Store.

***Use yarrow with caution if you are allergic to ragweed. Its use is not recommended while pregnant.

 

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 
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