Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
Herbal Information and Recipes
[ Member listing ]

All For The Love Of Lilac Jelly!


  [Read More]
 
 

Can You Say "Alice Advocates Alluring Alliums"?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Alice advocates alluring alliums, and so do I!

Well, it's that time year; time to start planting those Alliums, like onions, chives, garlic, shallots and leeks. Did you know Allium, the onion genus, has over 700 species, making it one of the largest plant genera in the world.

I love planting alliums for their flowers as well as their bulb vegetable. They are amazing specimen plants in the garden, and if you don't mind the smell, these umbel shaped blooms might become one of your favorite flowers too. Whether fresh-cut or dried, they are a favorite of flower arrangers as well. Alliums come in so many different colors from, pinks, yellows and whites, to blues and purples.

There are so many Alliums highly recommended for decorative purposes, so why not enjoy their unique blossoms and fragrance in the garden as well as grow them for food. These bulbs are among the easiest of all vegetables to grow and most of them store well, so it is not difficult to maintain a year-around supply.

 

But, some of my favorites Alliums grown for their flowers include:

Blue of the Heavens (Allium azureum) for its small summer blossoms in the purest cornflower blue.

Chives (Allium schoenoprasum) for their short, fluffy, pinkish-lavender blossoms and edible use.

Ornamental Onion ( Allium giganteum) which can reach 4 feet with very large violet balls highly prized in the bouquet.

Lily Leek (Allium moly) for the half-shady garden, its foot high spring yellowy-gold umble flowers can't be beat.

Blue Globe (Allium caerueum) for its production dense clusters of bright blue flowerheads up to 1 inch wide.

Daffodil Garlic (Allium neapolitanum) this heirloom has been grown since the 1800's for its fragrant smell and purest white globes.

So try growing some of these "Flowering Onions", because they are exotic, unique and great fun. 


As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Who Says You Can't Eat The Flowers


  [Read More]
 
 

Plants Used As Dyes

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 My mother taught me how to sew when I was a little girl. To this day I still make a lot of my own clothes, quilts, and anything else I have time for. With my love of plants it just seemed natural that I learn to dye my own cloth and yarn.

Dyeing with plants isn't a new thing though, it's an ancient craft and the techniques are well established. Textiles have been livened up with natural plant and animal pigments for centuries. It is amazing to think that some of these are still around today like antique tapestries, brocades, and embroideries- still rich with color.

My goal isn't to teach you how to dye, just to inform those who save twigs, spent flowers, seeds and other plant stuff, that you can do more with them then toss them into the compost heap. Color is one of the most beautiful attributes of a plant and using dyes from them is a great way to "save" their colors when the seasons change, whether it's in cloth or a basket of natural yarns. And if done right, it is possible to create a full spectrum of colors.

Some of my favorite plants include black walnut, marigold, hollyhocks, purple basil, elderberries, coreopsis, goldenrod, ivy, nettle, onion, wallflower, oh and the list just goes on and on. Basically plants that grow around me. I have used lichen as well, but as a botanist with respect for these fragile plants, I have only collected certain species. With plants you can achieve some of the most beautiful natural colors in nature.

Gardeners always find room in their gardens to grow new plants that catch their attention. I hope you make some space for a little dye garden and enjoy the colors all year long.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

 Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Don't Toss It......It's Full Of Nitrogen!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Making and using compost is not only a life-changing experience, but it is the world's best soil conditioner. I use my spent tea leaves as compost for my house plants; cactus, succulents, and herbs, plus I toss them in the garden. Tea leaves are full of Nitrogen, which is always needed for the healthy growth in plants. Its been known that by putting them in the soil that it helps with color development in flowers too, especially in red varieties.

I throw all my spent leaves either in the compost bin or directly on the garden as mulch. Both are very beneficial.

Using tea compost on your garden means:

    * You’ll spend less time weeding and watering your garden

    * You’ll need to use less artificial fertilizer in your garden

    * Your soil will be healthier, so you’ll grow healthier plants

    * You’ll save time and money

    * You’ll be keeping green waste out of landfill

 

All Morgan Botanicals loose-leaf teas, baths and soaks are compostable, it’s even on the labels! Look for Morgan Botanicals herbal products here at Local Harvest. So next time you buy tea, whether loose leaf or in tea bags, don’t forget to toss it in the garden. Does any one use their brewed leaves for anything interesting? I would love to hear your comments.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

 
 
RSS feed for Morgan Botanicals blog. Right-click, copy link and paste into your newsfeed reader

Calendar


Search


Navigation


Topics


Feeds


BlogRoll