Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
Herbal Information and Recipes
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The Hardest Part

  You know, sometimes the hardest part about being a herbalist; a healer: is watching ConeFlowerpeople poison themselves with food, swallow sickly emotion, feed off the negatives of life, complain without action, cling to ridiculous habits, be a prisoner of their own small thoughts and live in such fear of change. Change is hard. But it's only hard because we say it's hard. It's not hard. What's hard is to say it's their path not mine... and watch them live in their burdens. That's the hardest part. 

 

 

 

 

 Be Well
~Jessica Morgan


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Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing. 

 
 

Seaweed: "perfectly balanced natural food"

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Humans have been eating seaweed for ever. Many early communities lived close to the shore because the seas offered a constant and dependable food source. Neolithic communities in Britain for example clustered around coastal lands where rich and diverse foodstuffs were readily available.  The farmers of those times would certainly have supplemented their shellfish and seafood diets with some of the local seaweeds.

Sprinkling a little on your food (about a teaspoonful twice a day) will provide both salt and vital trace minerals. It is also a good source of protein and a rich source of iodine and iron, iodine is important for the proper functioning of thyroid and iron is important for blood cell function.

There are many different types with different benefits but most contain iron, calcium, vitamin A, E, K,  B-complex (B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12) & folic acid. Essential fatty acids, nucleic acids like RNA and DNA, phyto-chemicals as carotenoids. Rich in fiber and natural polysaccharides. This unique mixture of vitamins, minerals/trace elements, anti-oxidants and phyto-nutrients are rarely found in land plants. 

 Typical Nutritive Value of Seaweeds : Per 100 gm.

  • Vitamin A : 2 I.U.
  • Niacin : 5.7 mg.
  • Calcium : 1,093 mg.
  • Iron : 100 mg.
  • Phosphorus : 240 gm.
  • Fat : 1.1 gm.
  • Carbohydrates : 40.2 gm.
  • Protein : 7.5 gm

Here on the left is Sea Palm, and on the right Spring Nori, both wild-harvested in Norther California in Spring of '10. Look for both of these on my website www.morganbotanicals.com and here on Local Harvest as well. Both the Spring Nori and Sea Palm that I carry were locally and ethically wild harvested with permission.


 

Described as "perfectly balanced natural food" certain seaweeds, like certain land plants have been used for centuries by different cultures for medicinal and nutritional purposes from everything from warding off and treating several types of cancer, lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, to preventing ulcers, killing bacteria and treating thyroid disorders.

Check out this great recipe for a simple seaweed soup. I like to add chicken and other seasonal veggies as well. This is really delicious and nutritious.

Simple Seaweed Soup

1 oz seaweed

1/4 package of Enoki mushrooms
2 inches green onion (sliced length wise into strips)
2 cups Chicken broth
1/4 tsp. salt
Dash of pepper
1 tsp. soy sauce
 

1. Cut seaweed into bite size pieces. Wash Enoki mushrooms, cut off and discard root. Cut mushroom across into half.

2. Add pepper, soy sauce, salt (if needed), mushroom, seaweed to chicken broth. In small pot, heat to boiling. Garnish with green onion and serve.

 

 So, have you ever given any thought to seaweed? You should.

 

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

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Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

The Pumpkin Is More Than an Oversized Vegetable

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

To me, the pumpkin is more than just an oversized vegetable. In fact, it has a very long history-once considered a symbol of the whole world, a container of everything ever created. Early societies saw symbolism and spiritual significance in many round objects, from rocks to seeds and, yes, the pumpkin. If you look at the pumpkin you know it mean business: it's big, it's round, it's heavy and it's food, usually a lot of it. It's the whole world in a neat little package, so what else can it mean? Just that: the world. And that is exactly what it meant in the Old World. As the largest fruit of creation and full of seeds, it became a symbol of plenty. Pumpkins, together with corn (maize) and beans were an important foodstuff in the early Americas. The cultivation of pumpkins spread throughout the world when the European explorers, returning from their journeys, brought back many of the agricultural treasures of the New World. Pumpkins, and their seeds, were celebrated for a long time, both for their dietary and medicinal properties. 

But things have changed a little bit with this famous Cucurbit as its means as an important food source has declined and has fallen to the holidays merely for its ability to be a rather yummy pie and the traditional face of Halloween. And as we excitedly scoop out the endless supply of pumpkin seeds from our pumpkin patch pumpkins, we have lost sight of the value of these mere seeds. Maybe they're saved, maybe not. If lucky, they get salted and roasted and devoured. Maybe they get glued on to craft time projects or strung into kiddy necklaces. But, these seeds shouldn't be forgotten as they are one of Natures almost perfect foods and truly deserve a place in the everyday diet and medicine cabinet.

Pepitas, or pumpkin seeds, contain a wide range of traditional nutrients. Our food ranking system qualified them as a very good source of the minerals magnesium, manganese and phosphorus, and a good source of iron, copper, protein and zinc. Snack on a quarter-cup of pumpkin seeds and you will receive 46.1% of the daily value for magnesium, 28.7% of the DV for iron, 52.0% of the DV for manganese, 24.0% of the DV for copper, 16.9% of the DV for protein, and 17.1% of the DV for zinc.

In addition to their above-listed health benefits, pumpkin seeds have been associated with Prostatitis, Rheumatoid arthritis, Osteoporosis, kidney/bladder disorders, elevated blood lipids and cholesterol, help with depression, learning disabilities, and elimination of parasites from the body.

Pumpkin seeds also make a nutritious culinary oil as well as a highly nourishing and lubricating oil that is useful for all skin types. It is especially good if used to combat fine lines and superficial dryness and to prevent moisture loss.

Not bad for a seed.

As it is the time of year where most of us will be scooping seeds of plenty from our Jack-O-Lanterns, don't forget to save those seeds as they are so important to our history and health.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Lady's Mantle Is Her Herb

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Every single herb I grow, touch, smell or taste,  intrigues me in unexplainable ways. I love the plant, the folklore, the medicinal properties and simply the excitement I get from my work.

As a woman, I have come to realize certain plant family's, like the rose family, and their value of medicine giving abilities such as Lady's Mantle and Red Raspberry.

The common name of Alchemilla vulgaris, Lady's Mantle, owes its scientific name and a certain psuedoscientific reputation to the fact that its leaves are efficient collectors of dew. The alchemists, to whom the name Alchemilla refers, believed that the dewdrops that gathered on the leaves had magical powers to help them in their search for the philosopher's stone, with which they expected to turn base metals to gold. The name Lady's Mantle refers to the plant's shapely, pleated leaves, which resembled a medieval lady's cloak- one suitable for the Virgin Mary, hence the plant's original common name, Our-Lady's mantle. The  leaves usually have nine lobes, which accounts for its other common name, Nine Hooks.

This amazing little plant has been used throughout history to treat menstrual irregularities and difficulties. Due to the rich concentrations of tannins, it is especially valuable for heavy and excessive bleeding. The salicylic acid has sedative properties which helps alleviate cramps and painful menstruation. During the menopause years, the gentle power of lady's mantle can be quite helpful.

Like other members of the Rosaceae family, it contains a fair amount of tannins, along with trace amounts of salicylic acid. Because of this, it has been used for all sorts of woman’s health issues; excess menstruation and pre- and post-menstrual spotting, prolapse or feelings of heaviness, hemorrhage, irregular cycles and  conditions like fibroids and endometriosis in women.

The wound healing abilities of the Lady's Mantle herb have always been regarded highly within the herbal tradition. The herb possesses potent astringent effects and may slow blood flow to allow the first stage of healing to begin. It is 'of a very drying and binding character' as the old herbalists expressed it, and was formerly considered one of the best vulneraries or wound herbs. It has been used externally and internally to stop bleeding, to heal wounds, to relive vomiting, and in a host of other cures.

If you're looking for Lady's Mantle or other quality herbs, check here in my Local Harvest store, or on my site morganbotanicals.com

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Herbs For Men..We Didn't Forget About You

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Men seem to fall on the way side to women and children so often in herbal healing. But, from the heart to the prostate, ulcers , and even the common cold, herbs can play an important role on men's health. I have three men in my life; two are just babies, but none the less their health is very important to me. Knowing how to deal with and be prepared for, everyday "boy" complaints are skills I long to enhance. But, on with the men.

If you want to increase your health or suffer from symptoms associated with prostate, lowered libido, memory issues, palpitations, weight gain, depression and irritability- there are great herbs out there.

The following are some effective herbs commonly used in treating most problems experienced by men today, and are easily accessible.

Ashwangandha- beneficial for nervous tension, stress, anxiety, reduced sexual energy.

Hawthorn- cardiac tonic and vascular tonic, beneficial for treating high and low blood pressure, heart palpitations, angina, edema, and heart arrhythmia.

Motherwort- cardiac tonic and sedative, reduces palpitations, specific for tachycardia.

Gingko- improves mental stability, memory function, cardiac tonic, vascular tonic, peripheral vaso-dilator.

Oats- treats nervous system disorders, depression and anxiety, low sexual vitality, irritability, and urinary incontinence.

Kava-kava- helps reduce tension, anxiety, and stress.

Damiana- strengthens the reproductive systems, replenishes diminished sexual vitality, relaxant, antidepressant.

Licorice- beneficial for adrenal exhaustion, tiredness, and fatigue, digestive inflammation and ulcers.

Horsechestnut- vascular tonic, astringent.

Nettle- tonic for the reproductive system, liver disorders, urinary health, an edema.

Saw Palmetto- used to treat prostatitis, low energy, cystitis, bladder malfunctions, prostate cancer, and to build weight.

Hops- useful for hypertension and anxiety as well as insomnia.

Garlic, Ginger, and Cayenne- circulatory stimulants

If you looking for a herbal tea try our Men's Health Herbal Prostate Tea here in my Local Harvest Store. Our tea blend is highly nutritious and naturally benefits the maturing body. The perfect tea to support the prostate.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 
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