Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
Herbal Information and Recipes
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Sunflowers...The Unusual Vegetable?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Boy, is it ever sunflower season! We all know that growing sunflowers isn't that unusual but as a garden crop they are fun and productive to grow. I tend to grow too many sunflowers- I just can't get enough! I save and search for new seeds of every color and size.

Nearly all of the sixty species of sunflowers in North and South America are edible, and to me, this make them valuable. Most of us are use to buying and eating just the seeds, but sunflowers offer so much more. Did you know that the immature sunflower head can be eaten like Globe Artichokes? Pick the buds when they're swollen but before they open- they taste just like a floral artichoke.

As for the seeds, gather the seed heads in late summer to early Autumn before the seeds are dry enough to be released. Then hang them in a warm, dry place.  The seeds can be roasted, hulled, made into a fine meal for flour, ground into butter or oil, or just simply eaten. Shells can even be ground as a coffee substitute.

I'm already starting to collect seeds for next years sunflower crop and so should you because there are so many wonderful ways to enjoy them!

Look for unusual sunflower seeds coming soon in my Local Harvest Store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

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Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.


 
 

Horsetail -The Healing Stems

 

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I am particularly lucky to have Horsetail growing in abundance in my area. It's rarely cultivated since it is difficult to eradicate once established, but if you plant it in buckets to prevent it from spreading, you can successfully grow a small crop. Horsetail certainly makes a stunning presence in any garden, and is a useful addition to say the least. If you want to grow your own Equisetum arvense, it is best propagated in fall by division of mature plants. Horsetail has been declared a noxious weed in some areas, but I am always excited to see it prospering in the wild. 

Horsetail, or Shavegrass as it is often called, is a primitive spore bearing, grass-like perennial with hollow stems that seem to be impregnated with silica.  Today's horsetail is a shiny grass growing 4-18 inches in height, but in prehistoric times it grew as big as trees. According to myth, if you find horsetail growing in a field, it means there is underground water or a spring below.

Because the stems contain such a large amount of silica, (which is used by the body in the production and repair of connective tissues and accelerates the healing of broken bones) it is a great choice for tissue repair. Other than a fantastic wound healer it is a valuable astringent, diuretic, styptic and tonic.

I find it interesting to know that Horsetail is not only a rich source of Silica and Calcuim, but also Vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B5, C, E, Selenium, Magnesium, Potassium, Phosphorus, Iron, Manganese, Sodium, Chlorine, Zinc, Cobalt, Gold, Silver, Platinum, Rhodium- Alkaloids (including Nicotine), Saponins, Tannins, Flavonoids, and Phytosterols. There's alot going on in this herb!

One of my favorite herbal tea blends that  provides minerals for strong bone growth for the entire body is simple and tasty. All of these herbs are nutritious and are a good sources of absorabable calcium, magnesium, iron, and other important trace minerals. I recommend two to three cups a day as a gentle bone-building tonic. You can find all of these loose leaf herbs in my Local Harvest Store.

2 parts oatstraw

2 part nettle

1 part horsetail

1 part red clover

1 part rosehips

1 part violet leaves

Horsetail is not only a great medicinal herb for tissue repair, but also nosebleeds, lung weakness, kidney health, eyelid swelling, bleeding gums and prostate and urinary tract health.

It's also a good tea for postmenopausal women to keep their hair, skin, and nails in fit shape as the Silica and Calcium strengthen brittle nails; give life to dull, dry hair, and restore skin tissue.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Are You Excited About Damiana

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Damiana is a native of the Gulf of Mexico and regions of southern California and is also found in the wild throughout Mexico, Central and South America, the West Indies and Africa.

Turnera diffusa is a relatively small shrub reaching a height of 3-6 feet, and produces small, aromatic yellow blossoms and sweet smelling serrated leaves. It blossoms in early to late summer and is followed by fig like fruits with a similar taste. Damiana leaves smell alot like chamomile but is best blended with other herbs for tea, as the taste is rather bitter.

 

If this beauty is chosen to grow in your landscape, Damiana is best positioned in the back of borders. You'll want to choose a sunny spot where the plant will get from 8 to 10 hours of sun a day. It prefers the heat of the southern growing regions and is not frost hardy. It can be grown farther north provided it gets adequate sun and is protected from the cold. I've seen it successfully grown indoors as a house plant as well. When the roots get large enough, it can survive a winter freeze even though everything above ground will die back.

Damiana is very hardy but requires good drainage in whatever soil it grows in, so build up your soil with extra sand or compost. It's important to prune back the straggly shoots if you want to keep the plant in bush form. Don't forget to save the leaves to dry for tea. If you live in an area where the winters are too cold, keep the plant in a pot in the ground so you can easily pull it up and bring it indoors to a sunny room or a greenhouse.

 

As for its uses, Damiana has been popularly used as an aphrodisiac and for asthma, bronchitis, neurosis, diabetes, dysentery, dyspepsia, headaches, paralysis, nephrosis, spermatorrhea, stomachache, and syphilis.

Damiana is often associated with impotence and other sexual dysfunctions. This herb brings circulation to the sex organs helping to increase the libido. While men have traditionally used this herb for this purpose, women may find it a usefull herb as well. Women can also benefit from using damiana during their menses as it helps relieve painful periods and other symptoms such as back pain and irritability.

For those who suffer from mild depression, you may want to consider Damiana as an option. It works to help relieve stress and anxiety. And unlike many pharmaceutical antidepressants, it won’t decrease your sex drive. Look for dried Damiana in my Local Harvest store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

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Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

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My Mutated Calendula

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I have one mutated Calendula plant. You can imagine my excitement! It's silly, but I always get excited when I grow something that takes on its own weird form: something different than what it should be. I told my husband I was going to call her my "Special Mutant" and that no one can have her-she's mine! Of course he laughed at me, but understands my quirky ways.

So, this particular plant is of normal size and goes to flower like normal and even sets its seeds. But then, the seeds sprout into new flowers right on the seed head. Each mutated flower has ten or more tiny flowers growing right out of it, and they have seeds. Its just amazing to me. I've grown Calendula for years and have never seen this. I'd be interested to hear if anyone else has seen this, or is as excited as me to see it growing.

I grow these perennials for use in tea, oils, salves and loose herb. I won't be selling these seeds as I would imagine those of you who want to grow Calendula probably want a normal plant. But I do have Calendula in 1 ounce, 2 ounce, and powdered form here in my Local Harvest store.

Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

Calendula flowers have a multitude of uses including amenorrhea, cramps, toothaches, fever, flu, and stomach aches.

Internally it acts as a general tonic and can aid digestion.

Use externally as an antiseptic wash on irritated skin such as sores, cuts, bruises, burns and rashes.

For a little something unusual, try adding some petals to your soups, stews, and poultry dishes.

Morgan Botanicals calendula petals are grown organically without the use of pesticides. We harvest our blossoms spring through summer in full bloom before carefully drying and storing.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Running Around Looking For Horehound

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Marrubrium vulgaris is one of the first non-native herbs I learned when I was working as field biologist for Cal State Stanislas to protect native species. I knew the plant as a cough remedy and a candy, but didn't have much experience recognizing the plant back then. In college as a horticulture student we studied landscaping plants rather than "wild" plants; which is truly where my heart was. But none the less, I learned alot.

 Horehound is a perennial weed and member of the mint family. It's commonly found in disturbed, low-elevation areas throughout California. One plant can produce thousands of seeds, become very dense quickly, and is resistant to trampling. It is often times found flourishing on roadsides. In an ornamental landscape, this aromatic herb will attract bees to your garden.

Horehound is an amazing plant and useful to say the least. It is an excellent pectoral remedy for cough and colds, bronchitis, and sore throats as well as helping with unwanted phlegm in the chest. Horehound tea alone is effective for the common cold but I like to mix it with marshmallow and licorice root and make a syrup.

Beyond being an expectorant, it is a bitter tonic, diuretic, resolvent, diaphoretic, and laxative. A warm cup of tea will produce perspiration and urine flow; helps with asthma, jaundice, and hoarseness. A cold infusion is a great tonic for dyspepsia, and the powdered leaves are used as a vermifuge. Taken in large doses, it is laxative and will expel worms.

For harvesting and storing: The first year, cut the foliage sparingly. The second year, harvest leaves when flower buds appear, chop and dry them, then store in airtight containers. If you don't know this herb, you should- it's easy to fall in love with.

As always, email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Plants Used As Dyes

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 My mother taught me how to sew when I was a little girl. To this day I still make a lot of my own clothes, quilts, and anything else I have time for. With my love of plants it just seemed natural that I learn to dye my own cloth and yarn.

Dyeing with plants isn't a new thing though, it's an ancient craft and the techniques are well established. Textiles have been livened up with natural plant and animal pigments for centuries. It is amazing to think that some of these are still around today like antique tapestries, brocades, and embroideries- still rich with color.

My goal isn't to teach you how to dye, just to inform those who save twigs, spent flowers, seeds and other plant stuff, that you can do more with them then toss them into the compost heap. Color is one of the most beautiful attributes of a plant and using dyes from them is a great way to "save" their colors when the seasons change, whether it's in cloth or a basket of natural yarns. And if done right, it is possible to create a full spectrum of colors.

Some of my favorite plants include black walnut, marigold, hollyhocks, purple basil, elderberries, coreopsis, goldenrod, ivy, nettle, onion, wallflower, oh and the list just goes on and on. Basically plants that grow around me. I have used lichen as well, but as a botanist with respect for these fragile plants, I have only collected certain species. With plants you can achieve some of the most beautiful natural colors in nature.

Gardeners always find room in their gardens to grow new plants that catch their attention. I hope you make some space for a little dye garden and enjoy the colors all year long.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

 Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Plain Plantain. Or Is It?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I love seeing little herb gardens of plantain growing in the cracks of people's driveways. These "weeds" are far too often plucked out (just like dandelions) but I have my hopes. Do you ever notice how Mother Nature plops down herbs in the most convenient spots. This mighty strong and stubborn herb isn't that tough by accident you know. Plantain, whether plucked, stomped, pulled or crushed, never seems to die; in fact, it's so resilient, it'll grow where nothing else will. To me- that's a trooper!

Plantain is defiantly one herb that I put at the top of my list as a great remedy for coughs, lung congestion, hoarseness and anything else where excessive mucus is a problem. This particular herb is a good substitute for slippery elm which is disappearing due to irresponsible wild crafting practices, commercial logging, and Dutch elm disease. You can make a simple tea or a syrup (I like to add fresh ginger to my plantain syrup as well) and use whenever a hacking cough starts. Buy fresh dried plantain here.

Plantago is also commonly used internally for diarrhea, cystitis, asthma, hay fever, hemorrhage, catarrh, and sinusitis. As well as externally for eye inflammations, shingles, and ulcers. I often use it to sooth the stings from nettles too.

As a wound healer, plantain is superior. In addition to coagulating blood, the tea or salve has been known to close up even the most stubborn sores. You can even wash skin eruptions and rashes in plain plantain tea as a natural aid. Fresh plantain has been shown to draw out insect poison before it can cause major discomfort.

If you lucky enough to find this "bothersome weed" in your yard (and I'm sure you might) you can also use the fresh leaves in salads; steam and eat the leaves like spinach - their really quite yummy. What ever you chose to do with your plantain, don't be surprised to know that it is one of the wisest weeds on the block! You can find plantain here in my Local Harvest Store

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Yarrow...A Local Favorite

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) belongs to the sunflower family and can be recognized by its highly segmented leaves (millefolium means "thousand leafed"), and the clusters of daisy-like white or lavender umbel shaped flowers at the top of the stalk. The entire plant is strongly aromatic and similar to mothballs ( as fresh or dried yarrow repels moths). This drought tolerant plant can easily be grown in most yards and responds best to soil that is poorly developed and well drained. It is frost hardy and can easily be grown from seed and/or division. It is a perfect addition to an ornamental bed or border, as well as the herb garden. Seeds require light for germination, so optimal germination occurs when planted no deeper than a quarter inch. Seeds also require a germination temperature of 65-75°F.  Yarrow is a weedy species and can become invasive so should be divided every other year, and planted 12 inches apart. You can find Yarrow Seeds here in my Local Harvest Store.


Yarrow is one of the best diaphoretic herbs and is a standard remedy for aiding the body with cold and flu symptoms as well as breaking fevers. I like mixing yarrow with elderflower and peppermint for an effective fever reducer for my family. Simple yarrow herb tea has also been used in the past for stimulating appetite, helping stomach cramps, flatulence, gastritis, enteritis, gallbladder and liver ailments and also aids internal hemorrhage - particularly of the lungs.

Externally, yarrow has been used for all sorts of external wounds and sores from chapped or broken skin to sore nipples and varicose veins. I include yarrow in my Sitting Pretty Sitz Bath because it is one of the best herbal antiseptic and hemostatic herbs that help stop bleeding and prevent infection in tears from child birth.

Although yarrow should not be used internally during pregnancy, it is otherwise a very safe herb and is a good first herb in the home apothecary for the beginning herbalist. You can find dried Yarrow Herb here in my Local Harvest Store.

***Use yarrow with caution if you are allergic to ragweed. Its use is not recommended while pregnant.

 

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Rosemary For Revitalization

Jessica Morgan, M.H.This woody shrub blooms in spectacular hues, from true blue to rosy blue, and one white-flowering variety. It blooms in spring and sometimes fall with a wonderful aroma that fills the air with a fragrance like sweet pine. Rosemary has a long history of medicinal use, in culinary cuisine, symbolic blessings, and aromatherapy in gardens around the world.

This amazing plant is often used a a tonic, but it also relaxes the nervous system, which helps ease anxiety, depression, and tension headaches. It's antispasmodic properties help to fight lingering bronchial infections and help improve breathing.

Rosemary tea is also an excellent herbal tea to drink for those recovering from an illness or surgery, and especially for seniors. This particular herb gently restores immunity and health. Because of its antioxidants, it prevents cell damage from free radicals. It has no side effects and can be taken regularly. This shrub is antiviral and antimicrobial which helps fight infections, as well as anti-inflammatory which eases inflammation.

Use rosemary tea to brighten your skin and overall glow. Its antiseptic value will improve the skin's ability to resist infection and helps clear up blemishes.

And of course we can forget about slenderness. Rosemary improves the digestion of fats, and keeps wastes from accumulating, including cellulite deposits. This herb is a great choice for weight loss because it enhances the flow of digestive juices.

The whole plant above the root is beneficial fresh or dried. You can find freshly dried Rosemary Leaf in my Local Harvest Store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Simple Old Lemon Peel Tea

Jessica Morgan, M.H.The simple lemon has gone beyond your ordinary glass of lemonade. Did you know lemon peel contains calcium, phosphorus, potassium, ascorbic acid and vitamin A, as well as volatile oil. It is diuretic, carminative, immuno-enhancing, and stomachic. This citrus serves as a tonic to the digestive system, immune system, and skin, while increasing circulation to extremities. Lemon peel is used to treat and prevent vitamin deficiencies, colds, flu, an scurvy as well as digestive or gastrointestinal problems by stimulating the appetite and encouraging the release of gastric juices to digest food.

The citrus bioflavonoid constituents of this herb help stabilize blood vessels, especially the capillaries, making it an ideal remedy for healing varicose veins, bloodshot eyes, phlebitis and hemorrhoids (especially when the lemon peel is used to make a tea).

According to researchers at the University of Arizona, lemon peel, a good source of calcium, potassium, and Vitamin A, is believed to reduce and prevent certain types of skin cancer. Drinking lemon peel tea by itself or in green tea was found to have more than a 70% reduced risk for skin cell carcinoma. Drinking one cup of hot lemon peel tea 30 minutes before meals several times a day will not only lower skin cancer risk; but also aid in digestion and help prevent stomach irritations.

So don't forget your daily cup of lemon peel tea- you won't regret it! Very convenient, just put one piece of dried lemon peel to a cup of boiling water. Add sugar or honey if you like. Great as iced tea too. Look for dried lemon peel here in my Local Harvest store.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

What Can Be Said Wrong About Alfalfa?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.What can be said wrong about Alfalfa? Silly question huh? But really, what can be said?

Alfalfa has been used as a medicinal plant for over 1,500 years. It truly is known as "The Father of all Foods". What other plant could demand such a title? Not many. Alfalfa is high in protein, calcium, Vitamins in the B group, C, D, E and K plus tons of other trace minerals and chlorophyll. Because the root system of alfalfa has the power to grow to magnanimous depths, it is able to store such wonderful properties from the soil that most other plants can't.

There are wild relatives that are found around the world, such as Medicago polymorpha and others, but it is M. sativa that is most known, especially for medicinal use. 

Alfalfa has rich green alternate leaves and  is one of the richest sources of dietary fiber and chlorophyll. Many people use Alfalfa for nutritional needs, since it's been known to stimulate the appetite. Very ill patients often need it because it is easily assimilated and full of nutrients. The ashes of the leaves are 99% pure calcium. Alfalfa detoxifies the body and alkalizes it, and aids in digestion.

With numerous estrogenic qualities, women over the years have used Alfalfa to relieve pain and symptoms associated with their period. This plant can help balance hormones and aids in removing excess water from the body due to its diuretic properties.

Alfalfa is used topically to help heal infections after surgery, or caused from bed sores. It can help in constipation, hemorrhoids and gastritis as well as help the body fights off infection.

Known to reduce cholesterol and aid in preventing heart disease and stroke, Alfalfa has been studied recently for its ability to help diabetic patients who do not respond well to insulin.

I like using alfalfa in capsule form, in tea, and of course in liquid chlorophyll form. 

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Rosemary Popcorn: A Twist On Our Favorite Snack

Jessica Morgan, M.H. I love popcorn. Homemade with real butter. Yum. There aren't a lot of snacks that can top a simple bowl of popcorn except for a simple bowl of popcorn with fresh rosemary or rosemary oil.

Most would agree that homemade popcorn is the only way to go. Microwave popcorn is oily and easily upsets the belly. Below is my favorite recipe for fresh homemade popcorn that you and your family will love.

 


  • 1 cup popcorn kernels
  • 1 tablespoons rosemary infused oil, recipe follows
  • Finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • Good salt to taste

I use a popcorn machine but pop your corn as usual. Toss the popcorn with the rosemary oil. Sprinkle with finely chopped fresh rosemary, salt to taste, and serve.

Rosemary Infused Oil:

  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 6 fresh rosemary sprigs (can substitute dried)

Combine the olive oil and rosemary in a small stainless steal saucepan. Cook over low heat for about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature. Transfer the sprigs to a 8-ounce bottle . Add the oil and seal the lid. Refrigerate for up to 1 month.

Yield: 1 cup    Enjoy!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

The Herbal Bath To Soothe and Heal

Jessica Morgan, M.H.The skin is the largest organ in the body. Our skin is absorbent and alive, and everyday it absorbs chemicals from our laundry detergent, bleach, or whatever we put next to our skin. Treat your skin to nourishment by soaking in a medicinal herbal bath. Herbal baths are beneficial to your skin, ease stress, and help soothe aches and pains.

Morgan Botanicals uses fresh organic dried herbs and essential oils that smell wonderful! No artificial ingredients or synthetic fragrances. As you soak with whole herbs and botanicals such as Eucalyptus, Lavender, Spearmint, or Chamomile, you will feel your stress evaporate. Nourish your mind and your body with our line of botanical tea baths. They are hand-blended in small batches to ensure superior quality and optimum shelf life 

We have many herbal bath soak blends specially designed to soothe or relax. All our bath soaks come with a reusable muslin bag. Try our Ready to Relax blend or Simply Sensual.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.;

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Use Your Violets

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Viola ordorata, or Blue Violet as it’s commonly called, is not only cultivated for its beautiful and fragrant flowers, but is also used in perfumes, food flavorings, and herbal medicines. The plant can either be used fresh, or dried. The young fresh leaves and flower buds are used; and can be eaten raw or cooked. They make a wonderful addition to salad, but a tea made from the flower or leaves is equally as tasty. The flowers are demulcent and emollient and are often used for treating lung troubles. The flowers are also used to make herbal and culinary jellies and syrups.

The whole plant is anti-inflammatory, diaphoretic, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, and laxative. It is taken internally in the treatment of bronchitis, respiratory catarrh, coughs, and asthma. Externally, it is typically used to treat mouth and throat infections.

The dried leaf is traditionally used as a tea, and the fresh leaf and flower is traditionally used in salads, soups and other food preparations. May also be taken as a liquid herbal extract.

I like to use dried Blue Violet Leaf to treat digestive issues related to constipation and lung disorders. A Violet tea infusion is a good choice for lymph congestion due to colds, while Violet syrup is great for relieving respiratory ailments, asthma, coughing, lung congestion and sore throat. Violet Leaf tea is made by simply pouring boiling water over the loose dried herb and allowed to steep before drinking. Purchase Blue Violet leaf.

Blue Violet Syrup Recipe
Ingredients:
* 2 oz of dried Blue Violet Leaf (Viola odorata)
* 1 quart of distilled water
* 3 quarts of honey or glycerin

Place the Blue Violet Leaf in a stainless steel or glass pan and cover with the quart of water. Let it sit overnight. Place over low heat and simmer the mixture slowly until the liquid is reduced to about half the original volume. Remove and strain the mixture, pressing the herbs. Measure retrieved liquid. Take that measurement and add 3 times the amount of honey or glycerin to the liquid. Heat gently until the mixture is incorporated, then pour into sterilized jars and cap. Label and store in a cool place. Syrup made in this manner has a shelf life of 1 year so be sure to date the jars.

Refrigerate after opening. Standard dose for taking a syrup is approximately 1 teaspoonful as needed.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M. H.

 
 
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