Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
Herbal Information and Recipes
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Strawberry Is More Than Just A Berry

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

Along with new life, new leaves and new blooms, fresh herbs are in abundance in Spring. For me, this is the time to start collecting leafy herbs like strawberry leaf for storage. The garden strawberry is the most common plant of the genus Fragaria which is cultivated worldwide in the garden for its fruit. Although there are several varieties of wild strawberries, all of the species do have similar herbal properties, but mainly the leaves and rhizomes are used for this purposes. If left alone, this easy to grow perennial will successfully propagate itself and leave you with an abundance of perfectly usable parts.

The medicinal value of strawberry leaf is similar to that of its cousin, the red raspberry which are both rich in tannins, vitamin C and are known to posses diuretic and astringent qualities. Herbalists also regard the leaf as a tonic for the female reproductive system, using it in exactly the same way as raspberry. I like to recommend strawberry leaf tea to both pregnant and nursing mothers as well as young children due to the high contents of calcium, trace minerals and iron. The tea is almost as yummy as the berry, being fresh, mild and fruity.

Strawberry leaf tea has been used to treat a multitude of symptoms from eczema to stomach disorders. The tannins in the leaves are a gentle remedy for diarrhea, intestinal and urinary complaints. Use the leaves in the bath water for soaking away aches and pains. The tea is also used for healthy teeth, gums and bones. Strawberry leaf has been known to help heal wounds, scar tissue, and fractures; plus build resistance to infection, and aid in the prevention and treatment of the common cold.

I harvest the young leaves throughout the spring and summer, but particularly during blossoming for the finest flavor, and the roots in autumn which are dried for later use. It's important to collect only the best leaves since it's common for the plant to have leaf blight, mold or fungus. Also, keep in mind that strawberry leaf may cause allergic reactions in people hypersensitive to strawberries, so don't use if you have known allergy's to this plant.

For a simple tea, drop a handful of fresh or 2 tsp dried herb into a teapot and pour boiling water over to fill. Cover and steep for five minutes. Sweeten with honey if needed. 


If you're looking for loose leaf, you can buy Dried Strawberry Leaf here in my Local Harvest store.

As always, email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.


 
 

Yummy Yummy Sheep Sorrel

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Sheep Sorrel is one of my favorite "weeds". It's an ubiquitous weed in gardens, pastures, meadows, and lawns; and persists in areas of poor drainage and low soil fertility; in gravelly sterile fields; and is very difficult to eradicate. But, well worth planting in the garden!

Rumex acetosella has many common names, but the most common are sheep sorrel, red sorrel, and field sorrel. Flowers are typically yellow to red with male and females on different plants. Sheep sorrel is a small to medium sized plant; not taking up too much room in the garden.

There are several uses of sheep sorrel in the preparation of food including a garnish, a tart favoring agent and a curdling agent for cheese, in pesto, soups and omelett recipes. The leaves have a lemony, tangy/ tart flavor and are excellent in a salad.

Here's one of may favorite recipes for Sheep Sorrel Pesto

  • 2 cups coarsely chopped fresh sorrel leaves with ribs removed
  • 1/3 cup packed fresh parsley leaves
  • 2 garlic cloves roughly chopped
  • 1/3 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 1/2 teaspoon good salt
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
Simply puree all ingredients in a food processor or blender and transfer the pesto to a jar with a tight fitting lid and chill it, covered. The pesto keeps, covered and chilled, for 2 weeks.
Makes about 1 cup

A tea made from the stem and leaves can be made to act as a diuretic. It also has certain astringent properties and uses. Other historical uses include that of a vermifuge  as the plant allegedly contains compounds toxic to intestinal parasites and worms.

Looking for seeds? You can buy Sheep Sorrel Seeds here in my Local harvest Store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Medicinal Apples From Our Farm?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I've been spending the last couple of weeks thinning the three acre apple orchard from the Morgan Family Farm. Apples are such an amazing food medicine and actually have tremendous medicinal value. A fresh apple is not only an ideal snack, but it's easy to carry, flavorful, filling, and a good source of fiber. Or course we all know this, but did you know that apples have medicinal value?

Everyone has heard the saying, "an apple a day keeps the doctor away."  Well it's true, apples are good preventative medicine. Whether internally, externally, fresh or cooked, apples not only maintain health, but help detoxify the body. In fact, they're so good for us that we should eat them everyday! Apples are rich in fiber, tons of vitamins and minerals, especially potassium, which is a big part of the electrolyte balancing process, and are relatively low in calories.

A raw apple is one of the easiest of foods for the stomach to deal with, the whole process of its digestion is completed within hours. The acids of the apple itself are helpful in digesting other foods as well. The sugar of a sweet apple, like most fruit sugars, is practically a predigested food, and is quickly passed through the bloodstream to provide energy and warmth for the whole body. Applesauce is even gentler on the stomach than a whole apple, and can be used for a variety of stomach problems. Apple tea is a great way to get a quick concentration into your body, and dried apples are not only yummy but are a substitute for fresh ones.  Even the bark has been used in decoction for fevers.

Apples are great for both constipation and diarrhea. The fiber in apples is gentler than wheat fiber, and in general, apples help normalize the digestive system. Another great use for apples is as part of a detox or cleansing regimen. Since they are rich in soluble fiber, it makes them a good choice while undergoing fruit and juice fasts. Apples, as food and tea,  are also used to help with blood pressure. Cooked apples make a good local application for sore throats,  fevers, and eye inflammation.

Apples have long been called nature's toothbrush as they are an excellent dentifrice. This perfect food not only cleanses the teeth with its juices, but it also pushes back the gums so that the borders are cleared of food deposits.

Everybody can get fresh medicinal apples - we just need to eat them more. Hooray for the coming apple season!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.


 
 

I'm In Love With My Herbal Pantry!

Jessica Morgan, M.H. I'm absolutely in love with my herbal pantry. This cupboard is probably my favorite place in the house. It's silly, but I find solitude here. I just can't stop myself from peeking in, reorganizing or smelling it everyday.

I find and save jars, bottles, and tins so I can fill them with my beautiful herbs. Every one has a story, and I can remember where I found each and every herb and the bottle. Every year my pantry grows - it' like my sweet little child.

 When I first started working with herbs in the early 90's I had a half dozen jars of the basics, just a few simple herbs to play around with. But now, I just can't get enough. I love learning about, growing, drying and using new plants. So, my pantry keeps growing and now shes almost 20 years old.

The best way to store your herbs is in airtight glass jars, away from direct light, in a cool storage area. I like finding unique jars. In fact, the local German bakery gives away their 1 gallon pickle and sauerkraut jars. What a steel. Needless to say, I'm there weekly. It is important when using herbs that they are of high quality. The best way to insure good quality herbs is to grow your own. Most of mine are just tucked away in my vegetable and flower gardens- they are just part of the landscape and are free to pick. But, if you can't grow them yourself, look for the best. Dried herbs should be vibrant in color and have a strong smell. Of course they all won't smell good, but they should be strong.

If your interested in using herbs medicinally, the best place to start is to read, learn about, and acquire those herbs your excited about. I recommend starting with a few and learn them well. As, I said earlier, my herbal pantry took years to grow. You can always expand your studies and your herbal pantry as you grow more familiar with the practice. Take your time to fall in love with each herb and get to know everything about it from, how it works to what it looks like growing.So go ahead, empty a small cabinet and start your own herbal pantry, I guarantee you'll fall in love too.

Here's a shot of my own personal herbal pantry.

 

Looking to start your own herbal pantry? Check my Local Harvest store for beautiful, fresh, and organically grown herbs. I sell my herbs in 1/2 ounce to 2 ounce bags. Some good herbs to start with:

Dandelion
Chamomile
Comfrey
Echinacea
Nettle
Peppermint

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Sweet Lemon Balm......I'm In Love!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I have several lemon balm plants growing right outside my kitchen window, and I just love the wafting lemon scent that flows into the house. This easy to grow herb thrives in any sunny, well drained location. Both the foliage and the flowers are attractive in the garden and the small white flowers attract honeybees and other beneficial insects.  I love to add fresh leaves to salads, soups, herbal vinegars, and fish. A simple cup of lemon balm tea is delicious too. If using the fresh leaves for tea, the leaves lowest on the plant are the highest in essential oils. In pastures this plant increases the flow of cows' milk, and is excellent with marjoram after calving. You can grow your own lemon balm from seeds found here in my local harvest store.

Melissa officinalis is a mint with a distinctly lemony scent. Its botanical name Melissa is Greek for bee, as bees obtain large quantities of honey from the flowers. And  "balm" refers to balsam, the ancient world's most important sweet-smelling oils. For thousands of years herbalists used lemon balm to treat any kind of disorder of the central nervous system.

Lemon balm is an excellent carminative herb that relieves spasms of the digestive tract and is often used internally for indigestion, flatulent dyspepsia and chronic gastrointestinal disorders. I like to recommend combining lemon balm with hops or chamomile for digestive troubles.

Because of its antidepressant properties, lemon balm is a good choice for anxiety or depression, as the gentle sedative oils relieve tension and stress. For stress and tension it combines well with lavender and lime blossom. Balm also has a tonic effect on the heart and circulatory system, thus lowering blood pressure. If you looking for fresh dried herbs you can buy lemon balm leaf here in my local harvest store.

Herbalists often use lemon balm to treat viral infections of the skin, especially herpes, both genital herpes and cold sores. Although it wont eliminate the flare-ups, it helps relieve itching, and will help lesions heal. Lemon balm is useful, both medicinal and culinary and is a wonderful herb for just about anyone, including pregnant moms and children.

This beautifully fragrant herbs is one of my favorites and I guarantee it will be one of your favorites too!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Are You Nervous About Hops? Well Don't Be!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Whether you're young or old, rich or poor, everyone experiences insomnia at one time or another. Why use over the counter sedatives when there is a safe alternative? So insomniacs, us herbalists have the answer - Hops. Hops or (Humulus lupulus) is commonly paired with chamomile, valerian, or lavender but easily holds its own as a natural relaxing sedative. The dried strobiles, can be made into teas, tinctures, capsules, and tablets. I prefer the tea as is takes effect much quicker.

 Hops is considered by herbalists to be one of the most calming and relaxing herbs known to mankind. Of course there is an array of relaxing herbs out there, but hops is proven to be one of the safest and most effective. I like to use hops internally for insomnia, nervous tension, anxiety and for those with irritable bowel syndrome. Hops is bitter, but tolerable; besides, your going to see results quickly.

Externally, hops works wonders on eczema, herpes and ulcers. A pillow stuffed with hops is said to be relaxing, and will calm nervous conditions as well. I like using it in the bath for total relaxation for myself and my kids. Try Ready To Relax to help relieve stress and tension.

 I have to admit thought, this vine is spectacular just growing. Just its presence relaxes me. I could not live with out all my hops vines. I wouldn't trade my other herbs for it - I just couldn't live without it! Everyone should should grow hops in their yard.

If your looking for fresh dried hops you can find it here in my Local Harvest Store.

 Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Herb Garbling: Tedious But Exquisite

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Garbling certainly can be a tedious experience, but it is really quite enriching. I find that it has helped me get to know the plants I've collected even better. It's such a fun word to use too. I love when someone calls and asks what I'm doing, I love to reply, oh I'm just garbling some  Motherwart...or what ever herb I'm cleaning. Always makes them giggle, and it's always a fun way to start a conversation.

Oh, what is garbling you ask? Well garbling refers to the separation of that portion of the plant to be used from other parts of the plant, i.e. picking out wilted leaves, woody stems, stray grasses and other plants that came along with what you picked. This step is often done during and after the collection process. I always repeat this step after drying as well. Although there are machines that perform garbling, usually it is performed by hand.

Some may think it's silly that I dream about collecting herbs, but a day spent harvesting plants for use as herbal medicines is perhaps one of the most self-empowering things a person can do. For me, I love the whole process, wild harvesting or collecting cultivated herbs, cleaning, drying, then garbling. I love to sit and truly learn these plants.

When you take the time and effort to learn about the uses and virtues of a plant and how to identify it in its native habitat or how to cultivate it in a garden, or how to prepare it as medicine then you have given yourself the power of natural health.  Everyone should make use of the many safe and nurturing herbs found in nature such as Chickweed, Plantain, Dandelion, or Nettles as nourishing tonics. Pick a few weeds and practice the art of garbling, I guarantee you'll walk away with some appreciation for the little weeds in your garden. You can find freshly dried and garbled herbs in my Local Harvest Store.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Cornsilk and Its Medicinal Effect

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Corn silk (Zea mays) is a great herbal remedy for acute inflammation and irritation of the genito-urinary system, such as cystitis, urethritis and prostatitis. It is especially useful in treating inflammation caused by bacterial infection and its volatile oils neutralize fungi and yeast. It is particularly useful for calming bladder irritation and infection in children. Because this herb is a soothing and relaxing diuretic, corn silk clears toxins, catarrh, deposits and irritants out of the kidneys and bladder, plus it has a gentle antiseptic and healing action. The tea is also believed to diminish prostate inflammation and the accompanying pain when urinating.

By reducing fluid retention in the body, corn silk may help reduce blood pressure, and by aiding elimination of toxins and wastes it may relieve gout and arthritis, as well as act as a gentle detoxifying remedy for the system. 

Corn silk makes a good remedy for frequency of urination and bed wetting due to irritation or weakness of the urinary system, and has been used for urinary stones and gravel. Since corn silk is used as a kidney remedy and in the regulation of fluids, the herb is helpful in treating water retention associated with edema.

Corn silk tea  can be made by pouring 1 cup of boiling water over 2 teaspoons of dried corn silk. The mixture is covered and steeped for 10–15 minutes. The tea should be consumed three times daily.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Easy Herbal Healing For Heartburn

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Heartburn is often associated with indigestion, bloating, and dyspepsia. Most people can take stomach-soothing herbs as teas, and will find that they are as effective and safer then over the counter remedies as well as conventional medicine. When treating indigestion or heartburn, herbs can not only help alleviate the uncomfortable feelings but correct it as well. Look to certain herbs that help to decrease the amount of acid being produced in the stomach, such as chamomile.You also may consider herbs that absorb excess stomach acid such as flax, fenugreek (seeds) and slippery elm.

There are three categories of herbs that are often used to treat heartburn and indigestion: bitters which are digestive stimulants, carminatives which are gas-relieving herbs, and demulcents which are soothing herbs.

When looking for a tea blend such as Heartburn Ease Tea,  look for herbs that improve the digestive process such as mint, chamomile, anise, caraway, coriander, and fennel. These can help the uncomfortable symptoms of heartburn and other stomach problems. Our tea blend is not only tasty but safe for pregnancy as well. Take care!

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

What Can Be Said Wrong About Alfalfa?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.What can be said wrong about Alfalfa? Silly question huh? But really, what can be said?

Alfalfa has been used as a medicinal plant for over 1,500 years. It truly is known as "The Father of all Foods". What other plant could demand such a title? Not many. Alfalfa is high in protein, calcium, Vitamins in the B group, C, D, E and K plus tons of other trace minerals and chlorophyll. Because the root system of alfalfa has the power to grow to magnanimous depths, it is able to store such wonderful properties from the soil that most other plants can't.

There are wild relatives that are found around the world, such as Medicago polymorpha and others, but it is M. sativa that is most known, especially for medicinal use. 

Alfalfa has rich green alternate leaves and  is one of the richest sources of dietary fiber and chlorophyll. Many people use Alfalfa for nutritional needs, since it's been known to stimulate the appetite. Very ill patients often need it because it is easily assimilated and full of nutrients. The ashes of the leaves are 99% pure calcium. Alfalfa detoxifies the body and alkalizes it, and aids in digestion.

With numerous estrogenic qualities, women over the years have used Alfalfa to relieve pain and symptoms associated with their period. This plant can help balance hormones and aids in removing excess water from the body due to its diuretic properties.

Alfalfa is used topically to help heal infections after surgery, or caused from bed sores. It can help in constipation, hemorrhoids and gastritis as well as help the body fights off infection.

Known to reduce cholesterol and aid in preventing heart disease and stroke, Alfalfa has been studied recently for its ability to help diabetic patients who do not respond well to insulin.

I like using alfalfa in capsule form, in tea, and of course in liquid chlorophyll form. 

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Rosemary Popcorn: A Twist On Our Favorite Snack

Jessica Morgan, M.H. I love popcorn. Homemade with real butter. Yum. There aren't a lot of snacks that can top a simple bowl of popcorn except for a simple bowl of popcorn with fresh rosemary or rosemary oil.

Most would agree that homemade popcorn is the only way to go. Microwave popcorn is oily and easily upsets the belly. Below is my favorite recipe for fresh homemade popcorn that you and your family will love.

 


  • 1 cup popcorn kernels
  • 1 tablespoons rosemary infused oil, recipe follows
  • Finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • Good salt to taste

I use a popcorn machine but pop your corn as usual. Toss the popcorn with the rosemary oil. Sprinkle with finely chopped fresh rosemary, salt to taste, and serve.

Rosemary Infused Oil:

  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 6 fresh rosemary sprigs (can substitute dried)

Combine the olive oil and rosemary in a small stainless steal saucepan. Cook over low heat for about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature. Transfer the sprigs to a 8-ounce bottle . Add the oil and seal the lid. Refrigerate for up to 1 month.

Yield: 1 cup    Enjoy!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Oat straw: Simple Yet Effective

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Avena sativa is one of my favorite herbs for just about anybody. Anyone who is stressed, overworked, or anxious, should include oats as part of a daily health regimen. It is a safe tonic herb for the nervous system. Avena is exceptionally rich in silica, calcium, and chromium and are one of the highest sources of magnesium.

 I highly recommend oat straw tea during pregnancy for calming nervous tension and stress. It is also safe for yeast infections that occur during pregnancy and it is great for varicose veins as the infusion is useful in strengthening the capillaries. If your looking for a great pregnancy tea try Nutritional Herbal Pregnancy Tea.

For children, oat straw is a perfect choice for nighttime unwinding, as well as high in calcium to support growth spurts. Use for children who are nervous, hyperactive, or stressed. Our valuable blend, Teddy Bear Tea is all natural, healthy, and yummy. This tea will become your favorite nighttime ritual.

Take advantage of this simple herb and you'll see how gentle and effective it is. Combine with lemon balm and passionflower for a good nervine, and with valerian as a sleep aid, or with digestive bitters for any liver or digestive upset.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Herbal Diaper Wipes For Your Herbal Baby

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Washable herbal wipes are a super green and economical way to wash baby’s bottom, plus, it’s a great chemical-free rinse! The diaper service here in Tehachapi suggests that by using natural products like your own diaper wipes and natural herbal baby balms such as Sweet Cheeks Baby Balm and baby powders such as Happy Hiney Herbal Powder that the diapers last longer.

We suggest at least a couple dozen or more if you go longer than 2 days between washings. You can store your wipes in a container and simply toss used ones into the diaper pail and wash with your diapers.

I have found that these herbal recipes are best to use with cloth wipes. These will clean baby's bottom or face without any unnecessary chemicals.  During outbreaks of rash you will find these useful recipes may come in handy. Try these great baby tested recipes:

Basic Recipe for Baby Wipes (For Every Day Cleansing)
  • 2 tablespoons unscented baby Castile wash
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil (such as olive oil or sunflower oil)
  • 2 cups distilled water

  Antimicrobial Tea Tree Baby Wipes

  • 2 tablespoons Infused Calendula oil or other pure vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons unscented baby Castile
  • 2 cups distilled water
  • 4 drops Tea Tree essential oil

Anti-Fungal Herbal Baby Wipes

  • 1 cup distilled water
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar
  • 1-2 cup Aloe Vera Gel (fresh if possible)
  • 1 tablespoon infused Calendula Oil
  • 2 drops Lavender Essential Oil
  • 3 drops Tea Tree Essential Oil

Soothing Aloe Vera Baby Wipes

  • 2 cups hot distilled water
  • 1/2 cup Aloe Vera Gel (fresh if possible)
  • 4 drops Tea Tree Oil

For all of these herbal wipes recipes, mix in a jar and then pour over your contained cloth wipes (do enough for a couple days at a time).  Store any extra solution in the fridge.  You and your herbal baby are going to love diaper changes!

 

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2007. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Sneezing, Itching, Watering Eyes....... Use Your Nettle

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

For those who have learned to respect its sting and recognize its amazing herbal attributes, stinging nettle truly is one of our most delicious, nutritious and medicinal foods. Even though this plant can offer a crash course in plant identification, as well as contact dermatitis, painful tiny blisters, and possible burning like sensations, (OUCH!) get to know it, nettle has so much to offer.

Besides being very high in iron, calcium, potassium, manganese, and vitamins A, C, and D; it is nutritive, astringent, diuretic, tonic, and antihistamine. Nettle is particularly effective in treating allergic rhinitis, relieving nearly all the symptoms of itchy, watery eyes, sneezing and runny nose. This herb can be taken in the form of tincture, capsule or as I prefer in tea; two or three times daily throughout hay fever season. Some herbalist recommend nettle for dogs that suffer seasonal allergies as well.

The stinging comes from the presence of the histamine in the bristle. This is what delivers a stinging burn when the hairs on the leaves and stems are touched. But, the histamines and histamine-like compounds in nettle seem to be what interferes with the release of histamines produced by the body, thus relieving much of the symptoms that inevitably results from airborne allergens each spring. Combating seasonal allergies really can be as simple as a cup of nettle tea away. Morgan Botanicals offers nettle by the ounce and nettle seed as well as personal blends. If you would like an allergy tea blended please feel free to contact me.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Soap Nuts? For Psoriasis?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Soap nuts are the dried fruit of the Chinese Soapberry tree (Sapindus Mukorossi), found primarily in India, Indonesia, and Nepal.  The outer shell of the soap nut contains saponin, a natural substance known for its ability to cleanse. But its no secret, this fruit has been used to clean fabric for centuries. Now with the "Green" movement this plant is gaining popularity here in America and Europe as a natural alternative to modern soaps and detergents.

These nuts are incredibly gentle on clothes and skin, especially those with sensitive skin; including babies and those that suffer from allergies, eczema, and psoriasis.  Because soap nuts are biodegradable, they’re a better choice than regular detergent. They’re safe for the environment and even safe for septic and greywater systems.

Soap nuts are a popular ingredient in Ayurvedic shampoos and cleansers. They are often used in Ayurvedic medicine as a treatment for eczema and  psoriasis. These nuts have gentle insecticidal properties and are traditionally used for removing lice from the scalp as well.

I use soap nut most often to do laundry, but I also recommend using this soap alternative to clients with skin issues. If you suffer from psoriasis or eczema then this is an option for you. A new cleansing regimen combined with herbs; internal and external can offer relief. Soap nuts can be found in many online stores, and some health food stores. Look for the Skin Clarity Line in my store Morgan Botanicals here at Local Harvest. I have a tea, bath, and salve. This is one of my best sellers for skin complaints.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 


 
 
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