Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
Herbal Information and Recipes
[ Member listing ]

Morgan Botanicals Summer Herbal CSA

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Morgan Botanicals Summer Herbal CSA memberships are now open for registration! Enjoy 3 months of homegrown and wildgathered handmade herbals such as teas, tinctures, syrups, oils, creams, oxymels, incense, flower essences, hydrosols, essential oil blends and other herbal miscellany. Monthly payments are available, please inquire. www.morganbotanicals.com


Morgan Botanicals is very excited to continue offering year-a-round Herbal CSA Memberships! Enjoy fresh seasonal herbals that are homegrown, wildgathered, handmade and delivered to your door! For those who have supported our Herbal CSA in the past, we Thank You and hope you have enjoyed our herbal offerings. New herbals are being added to the share every season so we look forward to sharing the abundance!


This is a wonderful opportunity for local and not so local herb enthusiasts to be a part of our monthly herbal offerings program. We have created an Herbal CSA Program  for those who would like to subscribe. It begins each season, offering homegrown and wildgathered handmade herbals to each subscriber. Each month herbal offerings such as teas, tinctures, syrups, oils, salves, vinagars, jellies, incence, flower essences, hydrosols, essential oil blends and other herbal products will be available.

Our seasonal Herbal CSA's run for three months and the fee for the entire subscription (once a month pickup or delivery) is $160.00 for the Small Herbal CSA and $240.00 for the Large Herbal CSA, each payable at the time you subscribe. **Monthly payments are also available, please inquire.  Members will be able to pick up their herbals the first Saturday of each month, or your box can be mailed out to you (free of charge).

Morgan Botanicals Herbal CSA membership is a great way to build your own home supply of herbal medicines, natural bodycare products, artisan herbals, learn more about how to use local and medicinal plants, and explore new ways of taking charge of your own health and well being.


By purchasing a share you are also helping to support the plant work we do: growing and processing herbs, turning them into herbal medicines that nourish the body and increase vitality as well as our training programs that teach children about foraging, plant identification, how to grow their own food and medicine garden, health and nutrition and the basics of cooking and medicine making. If interested in our Junior Master Gardener classes please send inquiry to Jessica Morgan at herbalist@morganbotanicals.com and we will send you information on this program.

 

There are two separate Seasonal Herbal CSA Programs available:

Large Seasonal CSA Herbal Program ~ $240.00

Season runs for three months and includes six handmade herbals each month as well as a full color newsletter filled with herbal lore, tidbits, plant ramblings and herb use. Large is suitable for a family of 2-3, or to share among a group of friends. This is a total of 18 handmade herbal products.

Small Seasonal CSA Herbal Program ~ $160.00
Season runs for three months and includes four handmade herbals each month as well as a full color newsletter filled with herbal lore, tidbits, plant ramblings and herb use. Small is suitable for an individual or a family just beginning to learn about herbs. This is a total of 12 handmade herbal products.


Monthly Baskets can be picked up at Morgan Botanicals on Designated Pick-Up Day or will be shipped (shipping cost is included).

Summer 2013 Pick Up/Shipping Dates (Saturdays from 3pm-5pm)
June 1st
July 6th
August 3rd


How it works….
Each month members receive a package of herbs prepared as tinctures, loose teas, salves, honeys, vinegars, syrups, etc, and information about how to use them. Once you are signed up, you will receive confirmation via email or phone. We will contact you again via email or phone one week before your share is ready to be picked up or is being shipped.

A typical monthly share will include some of the following:

Delicious Tea Blends
Single Tincture or Extract
Salve, Cream, Butters or Herbal Oil
Herb Infused Honey, Electuaries or Jams
Medicinal or Culinary Vinegar or Oxymel
Elixir or Syrup
Herbal Scrub, Bath Blend or Bath Salt
Fresh or Dried Culinary Herbs & Blends
Smudge Sticks and/or Incense
Flower Essence, Hydrosols or Essential Oil Blends

 

To sign up or for more information, please contact Jessica at  herbalist@morganbotanicals.com or visit www.morganbotanicals.com

Monthly payments are also available.Here's how monthly payments work. You choose a CSA size and we split it into three equal payments, all which need to be paid prior to the start of your Herbal CSA season.  If you make payments there's a small additional 20% fee split up between payments, or pay in full and save money!

I will then send out a Paypal invoice, or you may send a check on your specified payment due dates.  You will then receive your herbal goodies for the three months; June, July and August!


As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

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Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, Herbalist


 
 

Morgan Botanicals Herbal CSA

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Fall and Winter Herbal CSA's are already filling up....they won't last long. Two different shares available and too many awesome herbals that you don't wanna miss! Sign up at www.morganbotanicals.com

 Morgan Botanicals is very excited to continue offering Herbal CSA Memberships! Enjoy fresh seasonal herbals that are homegrown, wild-harvested, handmade and delivered to your door! For those who have supported the Herbal CSA in the past, we thank you and hope you have enjoyed our herbal offerings. New herbals are being added to the share every season so we look forward to sharing the abundance!


This is a great opportunity for local and not so local to be a part of our monthly herbal medicines program. We have created an Herbal CSA Program (or rather CSH-Community Supported Herbalism) for those who would like to subscribe. It begins each season, offering homegrown and wildharvested handmade herbals to each subscriber. Each month herbal offerings such as teas, tinctures, syrups, oils, salves, vinegars, jellies and other herbal products will be available.

Our seasonal herbal CSA's run for three months and the fee for the entire subscription (once a month pickup or delivery) is 140.00 for the Small Herbal CSA and 200.00 for the Large Herbal CSA, each payable at the time you subscribe. Members will be able to pick up their herbals the first Saturday of each month (delivery option is also available), or your box can be mailed out to you (delivery option is also available).

Morgan Botanicals Herbal CSA membership is a great way to build your own home supply of herbal medicines, learn more about how to use local and medicinal plants, and explore new ways of taking charge of your own health.

HerbalCSAProducts


 

 

 ~Here's what came this month in the June Large Herbal CSA~

By purchasing a share you are also helping to support the plant work we do: growing and processing herbs, turning them into herbal medicines that nourish the body and increase vitality as well as our training programs that teach children about foraging, plant identification, how to grow their own food and medicine garden, health and nutrition and the basics of cooking and medicine making. If interested in our Junior Master Gardener classes please send inquiry to Jessica Morgan at herbalist@morganbotanicals.com and we will send you information on this program.

 

There are two separate Seasonal Herbal CSA Programs available:

Large Seasonal CSA Herbal Program ~ $200.00

Season runs for three months and includes five herbals plus an “extra”. Large is suitable for a family of 3-4, or to share among a group of friends. This is a total of 18 handmade herbal products.

Small Seasonal CSA Herbal Program ~ $140.00
Season runs for three months and includes three herbals plus an “extra”. Small is suitable for an individual or a family just beginning to learn about herbs. This is a total of 12 handmade herbal products.


Monthly Baskets can be picked up at Morgan Botanicals on Designated Pick-Up Day or will be shipped (shipping cost is included for those purchasing online).

Pick Up Dates Saturdays from 3pm-5pm

Herbal Oils and Vinager

 

How it works….
Each month members receive a package of herbs prepared as tinctures, loose teas, salves, honeys, vinegars, syrups, etc, and information about how to use them. Once you are signed up, you will receive confirmation via email or phone. We will contact you again via email or phone one week before your share is ready to be picked up or is being shipped.

A typical monthly share will include three to six of the following:
1 - 2 oz single tea (in tea bags)
1 - 2 oz tea blend
1 - 1 oz tincture
1 - 2 oz salve, cream or herbal oil
1 - 1 oz bag of dried seasonal herbs

One additional “Extra” Item will be chosen by Morgan Botanicals and included in your monthly basket based on seasonal availability a may included:

Herb Infused Honey, Electuaries or Jams
Medicinal or Culinary Vinegar or Oxymels
Elixirs or Syrups
Herbal Scrubs, Creams or Salts
Fresh or Dried Culinary Herbs & Blends
Smudge Sticks and/or Incense

 

 

CSANewsletterJune

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is an example of a typical monthly newsletter and what to expect in your monthly basket.

 

To sign up or for more information, please contact Jessica at herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

 

You can also find info or order from the drop down menu "Herbal CSA". I will be accepting Memberships until the month befor the season starts, so sign up now!


Thank you for your support, and Happy 2012!?

Jessica Morgan?

Morgan Botanicals


 

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Fan me on Facebook - Morgan Botanicals

Copyright 2012. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, Herbalist

 

 
 

Morgan Botanicals is offering All Loose Herbs at 20% off!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

  Happy Holidays from Morgan Botanicals!

 

What are you crafting up for the Holidays.......Morgan Botanicals is offering All Loose Herbs at 20% off! Stuff stockings, give your own tea blends or get yourself something special, just for you.

 

Morgan Botanicals carries a variety of herbs and spices. What herbs we don’t grow or ethically wildharvest, we purchase from reputable organic growers. Whether you're looking for a small amount of herbs or just want to get to know one that you're unfamiliar with, you can find many of them here in convenient one ounce bags.

 We use FDA food safe bags, and our labels are from 100% recycled paper.

 

 

This offer is valid only on my website www.morganbotanicals.com

Loose Herbs 20% Off!

 


 

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Fan me on Facebook - Morgan Botanicals

Copyright 2011. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 


 

 
 

You To Can Speak Botanical Latin in Five Minutes

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Common names can be a source of confusion. Frequently the same plant has more than one name: butterfly weed, for example. Because it was once used to treat pleurisy, butterfly weed is known by pleurisy root in some areas. Bouncing Bet, a common roadside wildflower brought to America by European settlers, is also known as soapwort: its leaves and rhizomes boiled in water make a lather for laundry and bathing. But, not so fast, other names for bouncing bet are fuller's herb and lady's washbowl...hmmm. Just as confusing as having a plant with more than one common name is having the same name applied to two or more different species. Marigold for example: Calendula and Tagetes share this common name.

To avoid such confusion, scientists use a standardized two-part naming system called binomial nomenclature.The first part of the plant's name gives its genus, the group to which it belongs and which it shares many features. The second part of the plants name tells it species-the particular kind of plant in the genus such as Rosa multiflora is the specific name for the mutliflora (many-flowered) rose. Also, the second (species) part of the name more often than not, describes something specific about the plant. Sometimes it tells the color of a plant's flowers; alba for white, rubrus for red, purpureum for purple. Or it may describe foliage; grandifolia for large leaves, rotundifolia for round leaves, millefoliium for thousand- or many-leaved. Or it may describe some other salient characteristic, erectus for upright, hirsutum for hairy, odorata for fragrant, myrtilloidies for myrtlelike. Some species names describe where a plant is typically found; montana- on the mountain, maritima- by the sea, aquatilis- in the water. And others tell how people have used the plants; edulis for edible, cathartica for cathartic and so on.

But, here's where it gets fun.

Botanical names are easier to pronounce than they may appear to be. With few exceptions, you simply say the word as you would any English word. No matter how many syllables the word has, just say each syllable, one after the other, the way you would if you were asked to pronounce any ordinary word slowly and distinctly. As for the question of which syllables to stress, even botanists may differ- but they always manage to understand one another, nevertheless. In the following examples, the syllables usually stressed are printed in capital letters. If you spend five minutes pronouncing your way through the words that follow, you will begin to get the knack of speaking Botanical Latin. The quasi-phonetic re-spellings after each item give only a rough-and-ready suggested style of pronunciation, helping to solve typical kinds of problems you may encounter in speaking botanical names or hearing them spoken. Note of ch, cn, and cy.

Abies balsamea: AY-beez ball-SAY-mee-ah

Achillea millefolium: ah-KILL-ee-ea- MILL-i-FOH-lee-um

Cheiranthus cheiri: KYE-ran-thus KYE-rye

Cnicus benedictus: NYE-kus ben-i-DIK-tus

Cynoglossum officinale: SY-noh-GLOSS-um off-fiss-i-NAY-lee

Cypripedium calceolus: SIP-ri-PEE-dee-um kal-SEE-oh-luss

Euonymus europaeus: you-OH-nim-us you-roh-PEE-us

Glycyrrhiza lepidota: GLIS-sir-RYE-zah lep-ID-oh-tah

Iris psudacorus: EYE-ris soo-DAY-koh-rus

Ligustrum vulgare: li-GOO-strum vul-GAY-ree

Lycopodium clavatum: lye-koh-POH-dee-um klah-VAY-tum

Lysimachia nummularia: lye-si-MAY-kee-ah NEW-mew-LAY-ree-ah

Medicago sativa: MED-i-KAY-goh sah-TIE-vah

Ruta graveolens: ROO-tah- gray-VEE-oh-lens

Stachys palustris: STACK-is pah-LUSS-tris

Tussilago farfara: tuss-i-LAY-goh FAR-far-ah


One specific name, officinalis (sometimes officinale: off-fiss-i-NAY-lee), deserves a special comment because it is part of the scientific name of so many medicinal plants. It means "of the workshop." The allusion is to apothecaries' shops, and the name signifies that any officinalis plant was once prized by the apothecary, forerunner of today's licensed pharmacist or druggist. Thus balm is Melissa officinalis; the dandelion is Taraxacum officinale; eyebright is Euphrasia officinalis, to give three examples. As you can see, the scientific name is really rather far from being mystifying, but gives us a bit of useful information about the plant, inviting us to learn a bit more.


As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Fan me on Facebook - Morgan Botanicals

Copyright 2011. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

David Winston's Revitalizing Ginseng Soup


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Fall is Time To Harvest Herb Roots

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Here's a great list of herbs I found that are ready to be harvested now. Some general guidelines to use for herb harvesting:

Harvest herbs grown for seeds as the seed pods change in color from green to brown to gray but before they shatter (open). Collect herb flowers, such as borage and chamomile, just before full flower. Harvest herb roots, such as bloodroot, chicory, ginseng, and goldenseal, in the fall after the foliage fades.

Herb roots ready for fall harvesting include:

Angelica: Collect the root in the autumn of its first year.

Barberry: Collect roots by November.

Bayberry: Collect root, remove and dry root bark.

Beth Root: Harvest root and roostalk in early autumn.

Bistort: Collect root and rootstalk in autumn.

Black Cohosh: Dig up root and rootstalk in autumn after the fruits have ripened.

Black Haw: Collect the bark from the roots in the autumn.

Black Root: Unearth the root in the autumn and store for a year before use.

Blood Root: Harvest the rootstalk in the autumn when the leaves have dried.

Blue Cohosh: Collect the roots and rootstalks in the autumn.

Blue Flag: Dig up the rootstalk in the fall.

Burdock: Harvest the roots and rootstalks between September and October.

Calamus: Collect the rootstalk between September and October.

Carline Thistle: Unearth the root in the autumn.

Comfrey: harvest the roots in fall when allantoin levels are highest.

Couchgrass: Harvest the rootstalk in early autumn.

Cranesbill: Collect rootstalk between September and October.

Elecampane: Dig up the rootstalk between September and October.

False Unicorn Root: Collect the root and rootstalk in autumn.

Fringetree: Harvest the root and peel the bark in the fall.

Garlic: Unearth the bulb in September when the leaves begin to die.

Gentian: Root and rootstalk should be dug up in autumn.

Ginger: Dig up roostalk in fall after leaves have dried.

Ginseng: Harvest root in the fall.

Golden Seal: Root and rootstalk from three-year-old plants should be harvested in fall.

Gravel Root: Root and rootstalk should be harvested in autumn once plant has stopped flowering.

Greater Celandine: Unearth root in autumn.

Hydrangea: Harvest roots in fall.

Liquorice: Collect roots in late autumn.

Marshmallow: Dig up root in late autumn.

Mountain Grape: Collect root and rootstalk in autumn.

Parsley: Collect the root in the fall from two-year-old plants.

Poke Root: Harvest root in late autumn.

Senega (Snake Root): Collect roots and rootbark in September and October.

Skunk Cabbage: Unearth root and rootstalk in fall.

Soapwort: Harvest between September and October.

Stone Root: Dig up the root and rootstalk in the fall.

Tormentil: Collect the rootstalk in the autumn.

Valerian: Unearth the roots in late autumn.

Virginia Snakeroot: Collect the underground parts in the fall.

Wahoo: Harvest the root and strip bark in fall.

Wild Indigo: Unearth the root in fall after end of flowering.

Yellow Dock: Collect the roots between August and October.

Once the herb roots are dug up, they must be thoroughly washed and dried. After scrubbing off all residual dirt, spread the roots out on shelves or tie them on strings and hang to dry. Some extra-thick roots, like Licorice and Burdock, should be cut vertically to speed drying time.

Drying can take several weeks and is complete when the roots are brittle. Roots that are fully dry can then be stored in glazed ceramic, dark glass or metal containers with air-tight lids. Keep the containers away from direct sunlight or heat.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Fan me on Facebook - Morgan Botanicals

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

 

 
 

Medicinal Apples From The Farm?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

It is apple season at the Morgan Family farm "Apple of the Earth Farm" and since the trees are spilling their medicine, now is the time to stock up.  Apples are such an amazing food medicine and actually have tremendous medicinal value. A fresh apple is not only an ideal snack, but it's easy to carry, flavorful, filling, and a good source of fiber. Of course we all know this, but, did you know that apples have medicinal value?

Everyone has heard the saying, "an apple a day keeps the doctor away."  Well it's true, apples are good preventative medicine. Whether internally, externally, fresh or cooked, apples not only maintain health, but help detoxify the body. In fact, they're so good for us that we should eat them everyday! Apples are rich in fiber, tons of vitamins and minerals, especially potassium, which is a big part of the electrolyte balancing process, and are relatively low in calories.

A raw apple is one of the easiest of foods for the stomach to deal with, the whole process of its digestion is completed within hours. The acids of the apple itself are helpful in digesting other foods as well. The sugar of a sweet apple, like most fruit sugars, is practically a predigested food, and is quickly passed through the bloodstream to provide energy and warmth for the whole body. Applesauce is even gentler on the stomach than a whole apple, and can be used for a variety of stomach problems. Apple tea is a great way to get a quick concentration into your body, and dried apples are not only yummy but are a substitute for fresh ones.  Even the bark has been used in decoction for fevers.

Apples are great for both constipation and diarrhea. The fiber in apples is gentler than wheat fiber, and in general, apples help normalize the digestive system. Another great use for apples is as part of a detox or cleansing regimen. Since they are rich in soluble fiber, it makes them a good choice while undergoing fruit and juice fasts. Apples, as food and tea,  are also used to help with blood pressure. Cooked apples make a good local application for sore throats,  fevers, and eye inflammation.

Apples have long been called nature's toothbrush as they are an excellent dentifrice. This perfect food not only cleanses the teeth with its juices, but it also pushes back the gums so that the borders are cleared of food deposits.

Everybody can get fresh medicinal apples - we just need to eat them more. Hooray for the coming apple season!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.comherbalist@morganbotanicals.comherbalist@morganbotanicals.comThis e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Boneset: Is It A Silly Name For A Fever Herb?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

People often ask me "Why such a silly name for a fever herb?" So, I'm clearing up this matter right away: the name boneset implies that this plant is used to treat broken bones, but actually has nothing to do with that, well.......not really. The names of plants often reveal useful information about them, but they can also be very misleading. With a name like boneset, you are likely to lead one astray since the plant was traditionally used in the treatment of fevers, not to mend broken bones. However, with a quick understanding of how the name came to be, it all makes a little more sense.

Boneset's name comes from its traditional use as a treatment for "breakbone fever," an old term for dengue fever. Dengue is a mosquito-borne, viral disease that causes muscle pains so intense that people imagined their bones were breaking, hence its traditional name.

As one of early America's foremost medicinal plants, boneset today has been pushed aside and simply regarded as a weed with a somewhat interesting past. The Indians introduced this native perennial to early Colonists as a sweat-inducer, a beneficial treatment for fevers. The Indians used boneset for all fever-producing illnesses: influenza, cholera, dengue, malaria, and typhoid. Appropriately, but somehow less used, boneset's original common names were feverwort and sweat plant. This forgotten wild flower is known to treat minor viral and bacterial illnesses as well by revving up the immune system's response to infection and initiate profuse sweating. When you run a fever, and employ herbs that cause the body to sweat, the sweat itself helps cool the body down naturally as well as open the pores and restore circulation. The Indians knew this all to well and I'd say we are lucky to have been introduced to this herb that was used for centuries by indigenous North Americans.

Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum) was listed as a treatment for fever in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia from 1820 through 1916, and in the National Formulary, the pharmacists' manual, from 1926 through 1950. It had no equal as a cough, cold and fever remedy during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. But over time it fell from favor, replaced by another fever fighter, Aspirin.

Traditionally, boneset is taken as a tea using the leaves and flowering tops. To prepare a tea, infuse 1 Tbsp. herb in a cup of boiled water and allow to steep, covered, for ten to fifteen minutes. Drink half cup every 2-3 hours. It's pretty bitter and well, kinda gross, but very effective and well worth the effort. Boneset also has the ability to loosen phlegm and promote productive removal which makes it a beneficial herb for colds.

A favorite tea that I use and like to call 'Fever Break Tea', is a personal blend of Elder Flower, Yarrow, Peppermint and Boneset. Then wrap up warm and allow the herbs to do their magic.

***Please keep in mind that boneset should be taken for acute conditions and for a limited amount of time, as long term use can cause degeneration of the liver and kidneys. However, it is still far safer than Acetaminophen and tastes equally as bad- so I personally will choose the boneset cure.

If you're looking for Boneset or other quality herbs, check here on my site morganbotanicals.com or in my Local Harvest store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Fan me on Facebook - Morgan Botanicals

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

 

 
 

Asthma: And The Amazing Herbs That Help

,Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Growing up as a child with extreme asthma, I spent my initial herbal learning years trying to understand the whats and whys of this condition.  Was it stress, weak immune system, our animals, what? I grew up in a non smoking home with a health freak mother and an environment that was cleaner than any hospital. So why was I having such a hard time. Ultimately, I believe it was stress induced asthma, and I had to find a way to control it.

So, being dependent on an inhaler for what seemed most of my childhood, and despising that I felt  'addicted' to this silly breathing apparatus, I searched for alternatives. I first turned to eucalyptus essential oil to ease my breathing troubles. I found that by simply inhaling straight from the bottle, my whole body relaxed. This was simply amazing to me. I mean really...it really was amazing. I had control for the first time, not my inhaler. So now that I could relax enough to catch my breath, I thought, maybe I needed to strengthen my lungs and immune system. I was on the hunt for herbs and oils that were going to help me breath. I so wanted to just breath. Sounds silly to those who have never suffered an asthma attack, but for those who have, not being able to breath is hell.

I spent my time learning about asthma and what triggers it. Asthma can caused by all sorts of things such as allergens from foods, food additives, pollen, mold, dust, mites, and pet dander, smoke, air pollution and toxins, colds, flu, or pneumonia, strenuous exercise, weather; such as extreme changes in temperature, drugs, and even emotional stress and anxiety. There is also often a strong link between seasonal allergies and bronchial asthma. Those with other respiratory disorders such as chronic sinusitis, middle ear infections, and nasal polyps were also likely to have nighttime awakening due to asthma.

That was me, I had numerous ear infections and tubes put in my ears three times. I grew up in the city with all kinds of little pets and I'm sure there was pollen in the air and what not, but I really believe it was emotional stress, as stress is the one things I have manage to eradicate from my life. I strive to live simple, silly, happy and stress free... period. But the good news is, that I have over come my daily asthma and when I do have trouble breathing (usually after weed eating/heavy yard work, or sometimes during outdoor activities in the cold or snow) I am now better equipped to control it.

Below are some herbs and essential oils I have found over the years to be very useful between and during an asthma attack. Learn about them, they may be helpful for you.

Herbal Remedies

There are herbs that will reduce attacks by strengthening the lungs and the immune systems as well as calming and relaxing.

Angelica -  possess anti-inflammatory properties and increases immune system function; which is why the root is often used in treating allergies as well.

Anise - often an ingredient in cough syrups and lozenges as an expectorant, which means it helps in the coughing up of mucus in conditions like asthma, bronchitis, the common cold and whooping cough. 

Coltsfoot -   since the principal active ingredient in the plant is a throat-soothing mucilage, it has been used medicinally as a cough suppressant and remedy for asthma and bronchial congestion.

Elecampane - long valued as a tonic herb for the respiratory system. It is often used as a specific remedy for chronic bronchitis and bronchial asthma. Elecampane soothes the bronchial tube linings and acts as an expectorant.

Horehound - anti-inflammatory and is often used to treat respiratory aliments such as asthma, bronchitis and whooping cough. 

Licorice - has been used traditionally to restore breathing and calm the breathing passageways.

Lobelia -  is a bronchodilator and antispasmodic which explains its popularity as a medicinal herb for asthma, spasmodic croup, pneumonia and whooping cough. It is thought to stimulate the respiratory center of the brain resulting in deeper and stronger breathing.  

Marshmallow -  a powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant. The soothing and healing properties that are found in the mucilage in marshmallow make it a valuable herb for many lung ailments such as asthma.

Motherwort - decreases the severity of lung spasms but also reduce anxiety, thus lessening the chance of an attack. 

Mullein - contains antiseptic agents and is mostly used today for chest ailments including asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, pleurisy and whooping cough. 

Passionflower - decreases the severity of lung spasms but also reduce anxiety, thus lessening the chance of an attack.

Skullcap - due to its anti-spasmodic and sedative effects, it is also great for treating throat infections and incessant coughing.

Slipper Elm - has anti-inflammation and anti-irritant properties and is often recommended for lung conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, sore throats, coughs, pleurisy, or lung bleeding.

Turmeric - powerful anti-inflammatory and it is believed to reduce inflammation. Shows a similar efficacy to cortisone.

Wild Cherry -  is an expectorant, antispasmodic, and antitussive. These properties indicate its usefulness as a preparation for bronchitis or whooping cough and can be helpful in coughs that accompany pneumonia. It is also helpful in coughs with influenza, where there is associated shortness of breath and or wheezing.

Aromatherapy Remedies

Aromatherapy can also be very beneficial in controlling asthma as a number of essential oils have healing properties that reduce inflammation, encourage emotional balance, ease pain, discomfort and the struggle to breathe, and cause bronchodilation.

**Always check with a trained aromatherapist when choosing the appropriate essential oils for treatment of asthma. 

Bergamot - anti-inflammatory and is reputed to strengthen the immune system and combat tension and anxiety.

Chamomile- anti-inflammatory and some studies have shown chamomile to slow allergic reactions, such as those that trigger asthma attacks.

Clary Sage - sedative and anti-inflammatory properties  contains several estrogen-like oils that, when blended together, work for this condition. Blend these oils together for a massage oil or add them to bath water.

Eucalyptus - reduces swelling in the mucus membranes. A valuable oil for fighting respiratory inflammation.

Lavender -   is relaxing, calming, anti-inflammatory and a gentle antispasmodic that soothes and comfort distress. Facial steams help open airways and the lavender can quickly relax lung spasms.

Pine Needle - in the bath or in steam inhalation or in a diffuser, will help reduce the incidence of attacks.

Rose Absolute - is an antispasmodic oil and can be used in steam inhalation to calm attacks due to stress.


As always, please email any questions to

herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Herbs Equal Tons of B Vitamins Too!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

Many herbs, vegetables, fruits and other foods are great sources of B vitamins. B Vitamin deficiency symptoms such as nausea, skin problems, insomnia, irritability, weightloss, water retention, nervousness, high blood pressure, depression, and panic attacks can be corrected and/or alleviated by simply boosting your B vitamin intake. Below is a small list of some of the most common herb sources.

 

B1- burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, dandelion, alfalfa, fenugreek, sage and yarrow.


B2 - catnip, cayenne, alfalfa, bladderwrack, ginseng, nettle, sage, parsley, red clover and chamomile.


B3 - alfalfa, blue cohosh, licorice, catnip, cayenne, burdock root and chamomile.


B5 - catnip, eyebright and black cohosh.


B6 - alfalfa, licorice, catnip and hawthorn berries.


B7 - barley, brewer's yeast, royal jelly, wheat bran, broccoli, cauliflower, legumes, mushrooms and spinach.


B9 -oranges, asparagus, bananas, melons, lemons, legumes, yeast, and mushrooms.


B12- bladderwrack, dandelion, alfalfa, and white oak bark.

As always, please email any questions to

herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

 
 

I Companion Plant.....Do You?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

As a vegetable and herb grower; plus wanting to actually enjoy everything I've grown, I have found companion planting to be one of the most important strategies to incorporate into the planning of all my gardens. I strive to have a beautiful nontraditional garden yard with brilliant displays of focal point corn and mullein reaching to the sky, all the while protecting and being protected form their own plant friends. My tomatoes with their display of juicy plump goodness and the nasturtium that's trailed its way through it....I'm serious. All of this in the front yard too! Really though, plants' themselves can offer protection from pests and diseases, can help build the soil, control weeds and even improve the growth and flavor of their neighbors. One could easily pull this off in any style of garden from a messy cottage (which I like) to an elaborate formal masterpiece.

By mixing your plantings you have a better chance for insect control than with the traditional row vegetable gardens that we're so used to seeing. In a monoculture environment plants become vulnerable as they have no assisting plants to protect them. This is why we see such high pesticide use in our farm fields. Take a look at how plants grow in the wild; they don't grow in perfect little rows all exposed, and neither should yours. By companion planting you can completely disregard the need for pesticides.

I'm a firm believer that wild plants, herbs, and even ornamental's play a vital role in the plant community. Some plants have the ability to bring valuable trace minerals from deep within the soil up to the surface. Look to the common dandelion for this, as these deep diggers send their roots into the ground and actually penetrate the hardpan and condition the soil. Some can work as valuable herbicides and fungicides by putting off smells that deter pests, others attract or lure pests keeping them off the plants we value, and some just contribute to successful growth.

I love to plant calendula and nasturtium everywhere since they are known to help with beetles, tomato worms, squash bugs, whiteflies, aphids, nematodes and other harmful insects. Onions and all Alliums are another favorite of mine that are scattered throughout the garden as they provide protection from moles, cabbage butterflies, tree bores, mildew, black spots, aphids and many other pests....not to mention that they're winter hardy and their flowers are spectacular.

Plant tansy with roses, raspberries, potatoes and squash because it is a deterrent to beetles, squash bugs, flies and ants.

Sage and rosemary are worth growing as companion plants; they discourage slugs, beetles, cabbage moths, bean beetles and carrot flies.

Parsley is a good "lure plant". It invigorates the growth of roses, tomatoes, and asparagus while repelling beetles, flies, and aphids.

Basil contains camphor, which confuses and repels hornworms and other munching insects. Also improves flavor of tomatoes, onions and peppers.

Feverfew contains pyrethrum, so plant several as "lure plants" near flowers and veggies because it will attract and kill feasting aphids.

Hyssop, thyme and wormwood are good companions with the Brassicas as they help repel the white cabbage butterfly.

Lovage is known to improve the overall health and flavor of many plants.

Stinging Nettle helps neighboring plants be more insect-resistant. Helps with lice, slugs, snails, strengthens growth of tomatoes and mint, protects fruit from mold, and important in the compost pile.

I wish I could go on forever but there are  many useful websites and books out there all about companion planting. Mix and match your borders with herbs, vegetables, and ornamentals, and you'll be surprised by how many fewer aphids are sucking the life out of your brussel spouts and mint....I'm serious.


As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

What's With All The "Worts"

 

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

So what's with all these weird names with the suffix "wort" like St. John's Wort, Mugwort, Birthwort, Lungwort and so on? Well, "wort" derives from the Old English wyrt, which simply meant plant. The word was used in the names of herbs that had medicinal uses, the first part of the word denoting the complaint against which it was specially useful. But, by the middle of the 17th-century -wort faded from everyday use.

Just wanted to share an interesting fact today...Enjoy!

 

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

 

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Oh My.....Tomatillo

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Tomatillos are perhaps one of my favorite and most prized fruits. They're not only fun to grow (as they are incredibly beautiful plants) but they are rich in flavor and yummy to eat.

This native of Mexico, which is much like a tomato, dates back to at least 800 B.C. and has for a long time been cultivated there, but has never really caught on elsewhere. For a plant which is so rich in flavor, productive and easy to grow, this is surprising. In Mexican cuisine the tomatillo is important, replacing tomatoes which have come to be used in their place in other countries, particularly in salsa or other sauces for meat. I love how they impart a unique tanginess which tomatoes never quite attain.

The tomatillo is a member of the Solanaceae family (the nightshades: tomato, potato, eggplant, ect.) and should be taken into account for your crop rotation plan. Physalis ixocarpa and phladelphica are the most common varieties grown but there are several. Most nurseries sell Physalis ixocara as the principal Tomatillo species. But, you can find many varieties of seeds which may include large yellow or green fruits as well small purple ones.

If you have never grown tomatillos before just remember that they are sun loving, warm weather crops and love the heat. You'll want to choose a site that gets full sun and has well-drained soil that’s not too rich. A pH reading that’s close to neutral (7.0) is good for them. Simply water and feed while fruits are forming. I pick my tomatillos as soon as they are large enough to be useful and continue picking until frost.

So for those of us who are picking our tomatillos right now (and I say this in pure excitement!) thank goodness there are so many ways to use this abundance of fruit. I myself enjoy salsas, verdes, fried, or any where I want some tang.

Here is a simple and delicious recipe for Tomatillo Jam - Enjoy!

 Tomatillo Jam

  • 3 cups cleaned tomatillos
  • 1/2 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 7 1/2 cups organic sgar, measured into separate bowl
  • 1/2 teaspoon organic butter (optional)
  • 2 bags of powdered fruit pectin
  1. Follow basic instructions for Jam making. (cleaning jars and preparing canner)
  2. Finely chop or grind tomatillos. Measure exactly three cups into saucepot and add lemon juice.
  3. Stir in sugar, add butter if desired, (this reduces foaming) and bring mixture to full rolling boil on high heat, stirring constantly.
  4. Stir in pectin and return to full rolling boil and boil for one minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and skim off any excess foam.
  5. Ladle jam quickly into clean jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of tops. Wipe, seal and place into canner. Water must cover jam jars by at least and inch.
  6. Cover and bring to gentle boil. Process 10 minutes. Remove jars and allow to completely cool. After cooling, check for proper seal, if lid springs back refrigeration is necessary.
This is the perfect spread across Chili Scones or homemade Corn Tortillas.

 

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

I'm In Love With My Herbal Pantry!

Jessica Morgan, M.H. I'm absolutely in love with my herbal pantry. This cupboard is probably my favorite place in the house. It's silly, but I find solitude here. I just can't stop myself from peeking in, reorganizing or smelling it everyday.

I find and save jars, bottles, and tins so I can fill them with my beautiful herbs. Every one has a story, and I can remember where I found each and every herb and the bottle. Every year my pantry grows - it' like my sweet little child.

 When I first started working with herbs in the early 90's I had a half dozen jars of the basics, just a few simple herbs to play around with. But now, I just can't get enough. I love learning about, growing, drying and using new plants. So, my pantry keeps growing and now shes almost 20 years old.

The best way to store your herbs is in airtight glass jars, away from direct light, in a cool storage area. I like finding unique jars. In fact, the local German bakery gives away their 1 gallon pickle and sauerkraut jars. What a steel. Needless to say, I'm there weekly. It is important when using herbs that they are of high quality. The best way to insure good quality herbs is to grow your own. Most of mine are just tucked away in my vegetable and flower gardens- they are just part of the landscape and are free to pick. But, if you can't grow them yourself, look for the best. Dried herbs should be vibrant in color and have a strong smell. Of course they all won't smell good, but they should be strong.

If your interested in using herbs medicinally, the best place to start is to read, learn about, and acquire those herbs your excited about. I recommend starting with a few and learn them well. As, I said earlier, my herbal pantry took years to grow. You can always expand your studies and your herbal pantry as you grow more familiar with the practice. Take your time to fall in love with each herb and get to know everything about it from, how it works to what it looks like growing.So go ahead, empty a small cabinet and start your own herbal pantry, I guarantee you'll fall in love too.

Here's a shot of my own personal herbal pantry.

 

Looking to start your own herbal pantry? Check my Local Harvest store for beautiful, fresh, and organically grown herbs. I sell my herbs in 1/2 ounce to 2 ounce bags. Some good herbs to start with:

Dandelion
Chamomile
Comfrey
Echinacea
Nettle
Peppermint

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Herbs For Men..We Didn't Forget About You

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Men seem to fall on the way side to women and children so often in herbal healing. But, from the heart to the prostate, ulcers , and even the common cold, herbs can play an important role on men's health. I have three men in my life; two are just babies, but none the less their health is very important to me. Knowing how to deal with and be prepared for, everyday "boy" complaints are skills I long to enhance. But, on with the men.

If you want to increase your health or suffer from symptoms associated with prostate, lowered libido, memory issues, palpitations, weight gain, depression and irritability- there are great herbs out there.

The following are some effective herbs commonly used in treating most problems experienced by men today, and are easily accessible.

Ashwangandha- beneficial for nervous tension, stress, anxiety, reduced sexual energy.

Hawthorn- cardiac tonic and vascular tonic, beneficial for treating high and low blood pressure, heart palpitations, angina, edema, and heart arrhythmia.

Motherwort- cardiac tonic and sedative, reduces palpitations, specific for tachycardia.

Gingko- improves mental stability, memory function, cardiac tonic, vascular tonic, peripheral vaso-dilator.

Oats- treats nervous system disorders, depression and anxiety, low sexual vitality, irritability, and urinary incontinence.

Kava-kava- helps reduce tension, anxiety, and stress.

Damiana- strengthens the reproductive systems, replenishes diminished sexual vitality, relaxant, antidepressant.

Licorice- beneficial for adrenal exhaustion, tiredness, and fatigue, digestive inflammation and ulcers.

Horsechestnut- vascular tonic, astringent.

Nettle- tonic for the reproductive system, liver disorders, urinary health, an edema.

Saw Palmetto- used to treat prostatitis, low energy, cystitis, bladder malfunctions, prostate cancer, and to build weight.

Hops- useful for hypertension and anxiety as well as insomnia.

Garlic, Ginger, and Cayenne- circulatory stimulants

If you looking for a herbal tea try our Men's Health Herbal Prostate Tea here in my Local Harvest Store. Our tea blend is highly nutritious and naturally benefits the maturing body. The perfect tea to support the prostate.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 
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