Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
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Beneficial Herbs for Menopause

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 "There is no more creative force in the world than the menopausal woman with zest"

-Margaret Mead

There are many wonderful herbs to help women comfortably transition into their menopausal years. Both Western and Chinese herbs are available which mimic the hormonal effects of both estrogen and progesterone within the body. These herbs "trick" the body into thinking it's getting the hormones. If you suffer from any of the associated symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, lowered libido, memory issues, vaginal dryness, palpitations, night sweats, weight gain, depression and irritability- there are great herbs out there.

Here is a list of some easily accessible herbs.

Black cohosh- beneficial for hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, vaginal dryness, prolapsed uterus and bladder, phytoestogen effects.

Motherwort- beneficial for palpitations, hot flashes, sloughing of the lining, phytoestogen effects.

False unicorn- beneficial for vaginal and uterine atrophy, and menstral irregularities.

Wild yam- beneficial for muscle and menstrual cramps, prevents bone loss, regulates PMS and depression.

Vitex-  benifical for water retention, depression, uterine fibroids, breast lumps, menstral flooding, and skin breakouts.

Dang gui- nourishes and build blood, hot flashes, irregular cycle, and vaginal dryness.

Nettles -helps with water retention, weight gain, strengthens bones (high in Calcium)

Oatstraw-  relieves tension, nervousness, insomnia, and builds bones (high in Calcium)

Black haw- beneficial for menstrual cramps and pain, flooding or excessive bleeding.

Kava kava- beneficial for tension, anxiety, and insomnia.

Ginseng- beneficial for tiredness, poor memory and concentration, anxiety, insomnia, and low libido.

Asparagus root- helps strengthens female hormones

Solomon's seal- builds reproduction secretions and aids vaginal dryness.

Epimedium- helps with hot flashes, night sweats, headaches, dizziness, and light headedness.

Along with taking herbs it is important maintain certain dietary guidelines to help alleviate menopause symptoms naturally. I like to suggest proper protein intake, whole grains and legumes, consuming lots of fresh locally grown vegetables and fruits as well as other phytoestrogenic and calcium rich food and herbs.

Are you looking for an all natural treatment for menopause? Look for my Women's Health Herbal Menopause Tea and Flash Calm Herbal Menopause Tea here in my Local Harvest Store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

 Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.





 
 

Herb Garbling: Tedious But Exquisite

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Garbling certainly can be a tedious experience, but it is really quite enriching. I find that it has helped me get to know the plants I've collected even better. It's such a fun word to use too. I love when someone calls and asks what I'm doing, I love to reply, oh I'm just garbling some  Motherwart...or what ever herb I'm cleaning. Always makes them giggle, and it's always a fun way to start a conversation.

Oh, what is garbling you ask? Well garbling refers to the separation of that portion of the plant to be used from other parts of the plant, i.e. picking out wilted leaves, woody stems, stray grasses and other plants that came along with what you picked. This step is often done during and after the collection process. I always repeat this step after drying as well. Although there are machines that perform garbling, usually it is performed by hand.

Some may think it's silly that I dream about collecting herbs, but a day spent harvesting plants for use as herbal medicines is perhaps one of the most self-empowering things a person can do. For me, I love the whole process, wild harvesting or collecting cultivated herbs, cleaning, drying, then garbling. I love to sit and truly learn these plants.

When you take the time and effort to learn about the uses and virtues of a plant and how to identify it in its native habitat or how to cultivate it in a garden, or how to prepare it as medicine then you have given yourself the power of natural health.  Everyone should make use of the many safe and nurturing herbs found in nature such as Chickweed, Plantain, Dandelion, or Nettles as nourishing tonics. Pick a few weeds and practice the art of garbling, I guarantee you'll walk away with some appreciation for the little weeds in your garden. You can find freshly dried and garbled herbs in my Local Harvest Store.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Herbs Used For Salt, Pepper, and Sugar Substitutes

Jessica Morgan, M.H. You may find yourself in a situation where you must cut back on your favorite seasonings or you may just want to explore the herbal culinary world. Either way, the clever use of herbs can replace some of our favorite culinary additions. 

I have spent tons of time and money tracking down exceptional salt and I know you salt lovers out there are aware that there really is no real substitute for salt, but, herbs can give that little bit of extra flavor that your looking for. Those on a salt-free diet can flavor their food deliciously by using such herbs as celery, summer savory, thyme, lovage, and marjoram. Try adding finely chopped lovage to unsalted butter- this can be used in your vegetable dishes or anywhere you like butter.

Basil, summer savory, thyme, marjoram, and nasturtium can help replace pepper in cooking for those who have digestive disturbances. I particularly like adding nasturtium leaves with other greens in my salads or tucked into omelets and turkey sandwiches.

Not only do these herbs make it possible to use sometimes half the usual quantity of sugar in a recipe, but they can also add delicious flavor. Some herbs often used as sugar substitutes in cooking are lemon balm, sweet cicely, angelica, and stevia. These herbs are particularly good in tart fruit pies made of red or black currents, rhubarb, gooseberry, plums, and of course tart apples. I like chopped sweet cicely added to lightly honey sweetened strawberries for a refreshing treat. Enjoy!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Very Interesting Veggies

Jessica Morgan, M.H. There is a sense of excitement that comes from growing something new in your garden each year. Why not explore your creative side and plant something unusual this year. I've put together some extraordinary vegetables with unusual flavors that will be worth the extra effort it takes to find these magnificent plants.

  • Asparagus Bean, also know as yard-long bean. A beautiful addition to any vegetable garden, and as good to eat as they are strange to behold. Easy to grow, produces abundantly, and has a pleasing taste all their own.
  • Borage is not the prettiest of plants when mature but useful to say the least. Leaves possess a mild, cucumber-like flavor guaranteed to perk up any salad.
  • Burdock doesn't need much water and is easy to grow. Slice the roots up for refreshing, sweetish, unusual aromatic flavor in stir-fry dishes or soups.
  • Chayote is low in calories and high in trace elements plus a good source of fiber. This vegetable pear is a tasty stand in for asparagus, or use it as you would potatoes or French fries.
  • Dandelion is enjoyable all year, and a closer look at its nutritional value should persuade you to do just that.
  • Horseradish root is useful both as food and medicine. Cook as you would parsnips or spice up a pot roast or baked ham. In the spring, the first leaf shoots of the plant can be picked for an unusual and pungent potherb.
  • Jicama tastes very much like water chestnuts, but with a slight hint of sweetness. These tubers can be used in a multitude of ways.
  • Luffa is a member of the cucumber family and is seldom seen growing in America, but spa-bathers and boat scrubbers are undoubtedly familiar with this sturdy "vegetable sponge." Grow some to scrub your veggie's!
  • Nettle if handled with care will make a valuable addition to you garden. Arm yourself with gloves and harvest away.
  • Orach has a mild flavor and contains much less acid than most other types of spinach. Add to quiches, roll up in crepes, toss into soups, or enjoy this delicious vegetable by itself.
  • Rocket is an excellent late crop with the flavor quite distinctive- sharp, spicy, pungent. Enjoy it at its best raw in salads.
  • Salsify has a multitude of uses. These roots can be baked, boiled, fried, or served in soups.
  • Scorzonera is delicious served hot with melted butter or a cream or mushroom sauce. But like Salsify can be baked or fried as well.
  • Sea Kale shoots have a delicate, nutty, slightly bitter flavor. They are yummy when eaten raw with cheese or in salads, or prepared like asparagus.
  • Skirret responds well to interplanting with salad crops such as radishes, onions, and leaf lettuce. Boil these roots up with salt and mash like potatoes.
  • Tomatillo's are the first cousin of the ground cherry. These sticky green berries are the perfect accompaniment to any Mexican dish.
The best part about planting unusual veggies is tracking down the seeds! Love you garden and it will love you!

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Sneezing, Itching, Watering Eyes....... Use Your Nettle

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

For those who have learned to respect its sting and recognize its amazing herbal attributes, stinging nettle truly is one of our most delicious, nutritious and medicinal foods. Even though this plant can offer a crash course in plant identification, as well as contact dermatitis, painful tiny blisters, and possible burning like sensations, (OUCH!) get to know it, nettle has so much to offer.

Besides being very high in iron, calcium, potassium, manganese, and vitamins A, C, and D; it is nutritive, astringent, diuretic, tonic, and antihistamine. Nettle is particularly effective in treating allergic rhinitis, relieving nearly all the symptoms of itchy, watery eyes, sneezing and runny nose. This herb can be taken in the form of tincture, capsule or as I prefer in tea; two or three times daily throughout hay fever season. Some herbalist recommend nettle for dogs that suffer seasonal allergies as well.

The stinging comes from the presence of the histamine in the bristle. This is what delivers a stinging burn when the hairs on the leaves and stems are touched. But, the histamines and histamine-like compounds in nettle seem to be what interferes with the release of histamines produced by the body, thus relieving much of the symptoms that inevitably results from airborne allergens each spring. Combating seasonal allergies really can be as simple as a cup of nettle tea away. Morgan Botanicals offers nettle by the ounce and nettle seed as well as personal blends. If you would like an allergy tea blended please feel free to contact me.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Soap Nuts? For Psoriasis?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Soap nuts are the dried fruit of the Chinese Soapberry tree (Sapindus Mukorossi), found primarily in India, Indonesia, and Nepal.  The outer shell of the soap nut contains saponin, a natural substance known for its ability to cleanse. But its no secret, this fruit has been used to clean fabric for centuries. Now with the "Green" movement this plant is gaining popularity here in America and Europe as a natural alternative to modern soaps and detergents.

These nuts are incredibly gentle on clothes and skin, especially those with sensitive skin; including babies and those that suffer from allergies, eczema, and psoriasis.  Because soap nuts are biodegradable, they’re a better choice than regular detergent. They’re safe for the environment and even safe for septic and greywater systems.

Soap nuts are a popular ingredient in Ayurvedic shampoos and cleansers. They are often used in Ayurvedic medicine as a treatment for eczema and  psoriasis. These nuts have gentle insecticidal properties and are traditionally used for removing lice from the scalp as well.

I use soap nut most often to do laundry, but I also recommend using this soap alternative to clients with skin issues. If you suffer from psoriasis or eczema then this is an option for you. A new cleansing regimen combined with herbs; internal and external can offer relief. Soap nuts can be found in many online stores, and some health food stores. Look for the Skin Clarity Line in my store Morgan Botanicals here at Local Harvest. I have a tea, bath, and salve. This is one of my best sellers for skin complaints.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 


 
 

Red Clover: Herb, Plant, Food

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Trifolium pratense, or red clover is one of the most useful remedies for children and adults alike, not to mention the tasty treats you can make. If your lucky enough to find this clover growing you’ll want to pick them in the morning just after the dew has dried off. Be sure to select only the fresh, newly opened flowers, and avoid any that look withered or brown. Carefully remove the stems and spread them out on trays. Try not to crowd the blossoms and allow to dry in an airy place, away from direct sunlight. When thoroughly dry, they will be crisp to the touch. Store them away from the light, in tightly closed jars.

This herb is a source of many valuable nutrients including calcium, chromium, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, thiamine, and vitamin C. Red clover is also considered to be one of the richest sources of isoflavones.

These beautiful edible flowers are slightly sweet. You can pull the petals from the flower head and add them to many dishes throughout the summer. A few tiny florets are a delightful addition to a summer iced tea: try serving your summer guests a cup of iced alfalfa mint tea with a slice of lemon and five to ten tiny clover florets floating on top- delicious! Or press the fresh florets into the icing on a summer birthday cake. The raw greens of this plant are very nutritious and can be enjoyed fresh or dried to get the nutrients.

Some of my favorite recipes can be whipped up in a flash.

Red Clover Tea
Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 2 Tbsp fresh or dried red clover herb. Let steep about 5 minutes, strain, and serve with honey.

Red Clover Lemonade

  • 4 cups fresh Red Clover blossoms
  • 1 gallon water
  • 2 cups Red Clover honey
  • 1-1/2 cups fresh squeezed lemon juice

Gently simmer Clover blossoms in a covered pot for 10 minutes. Add honey, stirring until it dissolves. Cover and let steep and cool for several hours or overnight. Then add lemon juice and chill in the fridge.

Red Clover Syrup

  • 1-quart fresh Red Clover blossoms
  • 2 cups Red Clover honey
  • 1 1/2 cups water

Crush blossoms gently, then combine all ingredients. Over low heat, bring to the boil, turn down and simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool. Strain and bottle. This syrup is soothing for coughs and sore throats and makes a pleasant flavoring for tea or pancakes. I hope everyone enjoys these recipes as much as I do. Look for fresh red clover herb and red clover seeds in my Local Harvest Store : Morgan Botanicals.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.;

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Holistic Answer

Jessica Morgan, M.H. I am frequently asked for custom herbal preparations to help with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Most clients that I have worked with were on conventional medication and were unhappy with their results. Herbs can replace prescription drugs such as Humera, but please consult with your RA doctor before stopping Humera or any prescription drugs, and let them know that you are considering alternative methods. Herbs have been used with outstanding results for RA sufferers, they do however, work much slower, gentler, and efficiently. Consider discussing with your doctor the best way of weaning your body off the current medication and then supplement with herbs and dietary suggestions. This way your body can readjust.

Herbs; internal and external, green tea, great food choices, and yoga are all very good additions to an RA regimen. Fish oils are also good supplements to try for rheumatoid arthritis since they reduce inflammation. Cod liver oil is a good choice.

Some dietary guidelines I like to suggest- avoid sour foods (yogurt, vinegar, oranges, grapefruit, and pickles) as these over-stimulate the liver, causing it to contract tendons and increase pain. Also, avoid acidic foods (citrus, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, potatoes, red meat, excess grains, alcohol, caffeine), which aggravate arthritis.  Maybe research acid/alkaline food balancing.

Some herbal preparations specific to RA and other joint related complaints that I make include teas, balm, baths, liniments, and poultices. These blends can be customized to your specific needs. I would suggest combating RA with internal and external applications simultaneously. Together, your body will be healthier and happier. Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.


Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Motherwort Anyone?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Leonurus cardiaca, or Motherwart, is an interesting herb; not just because its quirky name, but because it has a long history of medicinal uses. This herb is so important that the Japanese have a Motherwart Festival on the ninth day of the nithh month, also known as the “Month of Motherwart Flowers”

The plant and its use as a medicinal herb originated in Central Europe and Asia, although it has long been in use in the North America as well. It is very useful for a variety of ills, and is very nourishing, much like stinging nettle or dandelion. The herb contains the alkaloid leonurine, which is a mild vasodilator and has a relaxing effect on smooth muscles. For this reason, it has long been used as a cardiac tonic, nervine, and an emmenagogue.  

For menopause, use motherwort regularly to: Lessen the severity, frequency, and duration of hot flashes, relieve faintness with flashes, ease stressed nerves, relieve anxiety, and to relieve insomnia and sleep disturbances. An infusion prepared from motherwort may be used as a tonic to treat menopausal symptoms, anxiety, weakness of the heart as well as menstrual pain.

In addition to be a useful remedy for the reproductive system disorders among women, motherwort also possesses properties that invigorate as well as strengthen the cardiac system.

Motherwort calms a rapidly beating heart with readily usable minerals, trace elements, and an alkaloid exceptionally tonifying to the heart (and uterus). It has been known to strengthen the heart, reduce palpitations and tachycardia, while it tonifies the functioning of the thyroid, blood vessels, liver, heart, and uterus.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals

Consult your physician before using this herb if you take prescription medication for your heart. Not recommended while pregnant.

 Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M. H.

 
 
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