Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
Herbal Information and Recipes
[ Member listing ]

Morgan Botanicals Summer Herbal CSA

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Morgan Botanicals Summer Herbal CSA memberships are now open for registration! Enjoy 3 months of homegrown and wildgathered handmade herbals such as teas, tinctures, syrups, oils, creams, oxymels, incense, flower essences, hydrosols, essential oil blends and other herbal miscellany. Monthly payments are available, please inquire. www.morganbotanicals.com


Morgan Botanicals is very excited to continue offering year-a-round Herbal CSA Memberships! Enjoy fresh seasonal herbals that are homegrown, wildgathered, handmade and delivered to your door! For those who have supported our Herbal CSA in the past, we Thank You and hope you have enjoyed our herbal offerings. New herbals are being added to the share every season so we look forward to sharing the abundance!


This is a wonderful opportunity for local and not so local herb enthusiasts to be a part of our monthly herbal offerings program. We have created an Herbal CSA Program  for those who would like to subscribe. It begins each season, offering homegrown and wildgathered handmade herbals to each subscriber. Each month herbal offerings such as teas, tinctures, syrups, oils, salves, vinagars, jellies, incence, flower essences, hydrosols, essential oil blends and other herbal products will be available.

Our seasonal Herbal CSA's run for three months and the fee for the entire subscription (once a month pickup or delivery) is $160.00 for the Small Herbal CSA and $240.00 for the Large Herbal CSA, each payable at the time you subscribe. **Monthly payments are also available, please inquire.  Members will be able to pick up their herbals the first Saturday of each month, or your box can be mailed out to you (free of charge).

Morgan Botanicals Herbal CSA membership is a great way to build your own home supply of herbal medicines, natural bodycare products, artisan herbals, learn more about how to use local and medicinal plants, and explore new ways of taking charge of your own health and well being.


By purchasing a share you are also helping to support the plant work we do: growing and processing herbs, turning them into herbal medicines that nourish the body and increase vitality as well as our training programs that teach children about foraging, plant identification, how to grow their own food and medicine garden, health and nutrition and the basics of cooking and medicine making. If interested in our Junior Master Gardener classes please send inquiry to Jessica Morgan at herbalist@morganbotanicals.com and we will send you information on this program.

 

There are two separate Seasonal Herbal CSA Programs available:

Large Seasonal CSA Herbal Program ~ $240.00

Season runs for three months and includes six handmade herbals each month as well as a full color newsletter filled with herbal lore, tidbits, plant ramblings and herb use. Large is suitable for a family of 2-3, or to share among a group of friends. This is a total of 18 handmade herbal products.

Small Seasonal CSA Herbal Program ~ $160.00
Season runs for three months and includes four handmade herbals each month as well as a full color newsletter filled with herbal lore, tidbits, plant ramblings and herb use. Small is suitable for an individual or a family just beginning to learn about herbs. This is a total of 12 handmade herbal products.


Monthly Baskets can be picked up at Morgan Botanicals on Designated Pick-Up Day or will be shipped (shipping cost is included).

Summer 2013 Pick Up/Shipping Dates (Saturdays from 3pm-5pm)
June 1st
July 6th
August 3rd


How it works….
Each month members receive a package of herbs prepared as tinctures, loose teas, salves, honeys, vinegars, syrups, etc, and information about how to use them. Once you are signed up, you will receive confirmation via email or phone. We will contact you again via email or phone one week before your share is ready to be picked up or is being shipped.

A typical monthly share will include some of the following:

Delicious Tea Blends
Single Tincture or Extract
Salve, Cream, Butters or Herbal Oil
Herb Infused Honey, Electuaries or Jams
Medicinal or Culinary Vinegar or Oxymel
Elixir or Syrup
Herbal Scrub, Bath Blend or Bath Salt
Fresh or Dried Culinary Herbs & Blends
Smudge Sticks and/or Incense
Flower Essence, Hydrosols or Essential Oil Blends

 

To sign up or for more information, please contact Jessica at  herbalist@morganbotanicals.com or visit www.morganbotanicals.com

Monthly payments are also available.Here's how monthly payments work. You choose a CSA size and we split it into three equal payments, all which need to be paid prior to the start of your Herbal CSA season.  If you make payments there's a small additional 20% fee split up between payments, or pay in full and save money!

I will then send out a Paypal invoice, or you may send a check on your specified payment due dates.  You will then receive your herbal goodies for the three months; June, July and August!


As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

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Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, Herbalist


 
 

You To Can Speak Botanical Latin in Five Minutes

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Common names can be a source of confusion. Frequently the same plant has more than one name: butterfly weed, for example. Because it was once used to treat pleurisy, butterfly weed is known by pleurisy root in some areas. Bouncing Bet, a common roadside wildflower brought to America by European settlers, is also known as soapwort: its leaves and rhizomes boiled in water make a lather for laundry and bathing. But, not so fast, other names for bouncing bet are fuller's herb and lady's washbowl...hmmm. Just as confusing as having a plant with more than one common name is having the same name applied to two or more different species. Marigold for example: Calendula and Tagetes share this common name.

To avoid such confusion, scientists use a standardized two-part naming system called binomial nomenclature.The first part of the plant's name gives its genus, the group to which it belongs and which it shares many features. The second part of the plants name tells it species-the particular kind of plant in the genus such as Rosa multiflora is the specific name for the mutliflora (many-flowered) rose. Also, the second (species) part of the name more often than not, describes something specific about the plant. Sometimes it tells the color of a plant's flowers; alba for white, rubrus for red, purpureum for purple. Or it may describe foliage; grandifolia for large leaves, rotundifolia for round leaves, millefoliium for thousand- or many-leaved. Or it may describe some other salient characteristic, erectus for upright, hirsutum for hairy, odorata for fragrant, myrtilloidies for myrtlelike. Some species names describe where a plant is typically found; montana- on the mountain, maritima- by the sea, aquatilis- in the water. And others tell how people have used the plants; edulis for edible, cathartica for cathartic and so on.

But, here's where it gets fun.

Botanical names are easier to pronounce than they may appear to be. With few exceptions, you simply say the word as you would any English word. No matter how many syllables the word has, just say each syllable, one after the other, the way you would if you were asked to pronounce any ordinary word slowly and distinctly. As for the question of which syllables to stress, even botanists may differ- but they always manage to understand one another, nevertheless. In the following examples, the syllables usually stressed are printed in capital letters. If you spend five minutes pronouncing your way through the words that follow, you will begin to get the knack of speaking Botanical Latin. The quasi-phonetic re-spellings after each item give only a rough-and-ready suggested style of pronunciation, helping to solve typical kinds of problems you may encounter in speaking botanical names or hearing them spoken. Note of ch, cn, and cy.

Abies balsamea: AY-beez ball-SAY-mee-ah

Achillea millefolium: ah-KILL-ee-ea- MILL-i-FOH-lee-um

Cheiranthus cheiri: KYE-ran-thus KYE-rye

Cnicus benedictus: NYE-kus ben-i-DIK-tus

Cynoglossum officinale: SY-noh-GLOSS-um off-fiss-i-NAY-lee

Cypripedium calceolus: SIP-ri-PEE-dee-um kal-SEE-oh-luss

Euonymus europaeus: you-OH-nim-us you-roh-PEE-us

Glycyrrhiza lepidota: GLIS-sir-RYE-zah lep-ID-oh-tah

Iris psudacorus: EYE-ris soo-DAY-koh-rus

Ligustrum vulgare: li-GOO-strum vul-GAY-ree

Lycopodium clavatum: lye-koh-POH-dee-um klah-VAY-tum

Lysimachia nummularia: lye-si-MAY-kee-ah NEW-mew-LAY-ree-ah

Medicago sativa: MED-i-KAY-goh sah-TIE-vah

Ruta graveolens: ROO-tah- gray-VEE-oh-lens

Stachys palustris: STACK-is pah-LUSS-tris

Tussilago farfara: tuss-i-LAY-goh FAR-far-ah


One specific name, officinalis (sometimes officinale: off-fiss-i-NAY-lee), deserves a special comment because it is part of the scientific name of so many medicinal plants. It means "of the workshop." The allusion is to apothecaries' shops, and the name signifies that any officinalis plant was once prized by the apothecary, forerunner of today's licensed pharmacist or druggist. Thus balm is Melissa officinalis; the dandelion is Taraxacum officinale; eyebright is Euphrasia officinalis, to give three examples. As you can see, the scientific name is really rather far from being mystifying, but gives us a bit of useful information about the plant, inviting us to learn a bit more.


As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

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Copyright 2011. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

I Companion Plant.....Do You?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

As a vegetable and herb grower; plus wanting to actually enjoy everything I've grown, I have found companion planting to be one of the most important strategies to incorporate into the planning of all my gardens. I strive to have a beautiful nontraditional garden yard with brilliant displays of focal point corn and mullein reaching to the sky, all the while protecting and being protected form their own plant friends. My tomatoes with their display of juicy plump goodness and the nasturtium that's trailed its way through it....I'm serious. All of this in the front yard too! Really though, plants' themselves can offer protection from pests and diseases, can help build the soil, control weeds and even improve the growth and flavor of their neighbors. One could easily pull this off in any style of garden from a messy cottage (which I like) to an elaborate formal masterpiece.

By mixing your plantings you have a better chance for insect control than with the traditional row vegetable gardens that we're so used to seeing. In a monoculture environment plants become vulnerable as they have no assisting plants to protect them. This is why we see such high pesticide use in our farm fields. Take a look at how plants grow in the wild; they don't grow in perfect little rows all exposed, and neither should yours. By companion planting you can completely disregard the need for pesticides.

I'm a firm believer that wild plants, herbs, and even ornamental's play a vital role in the plant community. Some plants have the ability to bring valuable trace minerals from deep within the soil up to the surface. Look to the common dandelion for this, as these deep diggers send their roots into the ground and actually penetrate the hardpan and condition the soil. Some can work as valuable herbicides and fungicides by putting off smells that deter pests, others attract or lure pests keeping them off the plants we value, and some just contribute to successful growth.

I love to plant calendula and nasturtium everywhere since they are known to help with beetles, tomato worms, squash bugs, whiteflies, aphids, nematodes and other harmful insects. Onions and all Alliums are another favorite of mine that are scattered throughout the garden as they provide protection from moles, cabbage butterflies, tree bores, mildew, black spots, aphids and many other pests....not to mention that they're winter hardy and their flowers are spectacular.

Plant tansy with roses, raspberries, potatoes and squash because it is a deterrent to beetles, squash bugs, flies and ants.

Sage and rosemary are worth growing as companion plants; they discourage slugs, beetles, cabbage moths, bean beetles and carrot flies.

Parsley is a good "lure plant". It invigorates the growth of roses, tomatoes, and asparagus while repelling beetles, flies, and aphids.

Basil contains camphor, which confuses and repels hornworms and other munching insects. Also improves flavor of tomatoes, onions and peppers.

Feverfew contains pyrethrum, so plant several as "lure plants" near flowers and veggies because it will attract and kill feasting aphids.

Hyssop, thyme and wormwood are good companions with the Brassicas as they help repel the white cabbage butterfly.

Lovage is known to improve the overall health and flavor of many plants.

Stinging Nettle helps neighboring plants be more insect-resistant. Helps with lice, slugs, snails, strengthens growth of tomatoes and mint, protects fruit from mold, and important in the compost pile.

I wish I could go on forever but there are  many useful websites and books out there all about companion planting. Mix and match your borders with herbs, vegetables, and ornamentals, and you'll be surprised by how many fewer aphids are sucking the life out of your brussel spouts and mint....I'm serious.


As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

What's With All The "Worts"

 

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

So what's with all these weird names with the suffix "wort" like St. John's Wort, Mugwort, Birthwort, Lungwort and so on? Well, "wort" derives from the Old English wyrt, which simply meant plant. The word was used in the names of herbs that had medicinal uses, the first part of the word denoting the complaint against which it was specially useful. But, by the middle of the 17th-century -wort faded from everyday use.

Just wanted to share an interesting fact today...Enjoy!

 

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

 

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Chaparral: 11,000 Years of Skin Protection?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Chaparral is one of the most widespread plants found on the desert floor, and some of them are noted to be the oldest living plants in the world. Expansive areas of these shrubs are found growing throughout the desert in western San Bernardino County, and some near Ridgecrest Ca are estimated to be 11,000 years old. Botanists believe that many of surrounding plants are clones of these original plants. Chaparral is regarded as one of the most adaptable desert plants in the world; as it was one of the first to grow back in Yucca Flats after the 1962 nuclear bomb tests done there.

Also known as the "creosote bush," Larrea tridentata is a flowering evergreen shrub that's native to Southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico. One interesting characteristic of this plant is that it produces a sap that prevents competing species from growing near it. So this is why we usually see just this plant species in Chaparral populated ares. Also, its extremely bitter taste keeps it safe from animals that would otherwise graze upon it. The common name Chaparral derives from the Spanish chaparro, meaning "evergreen oak," and the name "creosote bush" comes from the smell that the plant exudes when it rains.

As a medicinal herb, Indians of the Southwestern desert regions used the sap as a sunscreen, as the sticky resin is known to screen against ultraviolet radiation. The dried herb, when brewed in tea has been used for numerous aliments and appears to help the body rid itself of parasites as well as chemical toxins. Internal use is not recommended unless under the care of a qualified health care professional. Chaparral contains saponins and medicinal qualities that are especially beneficial to the skin. Applied to the skin, chaparral can have a remarkable healing effect on dandruff, eczema, herpes, cold sores, psoriasis, and contact dermatitis.

I know most people don't consider the creosote/turpentine aroma of the Chaparral pleasant, but non the less, I like to recommend Chaparral for use in herbal shampoos, salves and skin washes as it really is a miracle worker on the skin. Looking for Chaparral Leaf? Find it here in my Local Harvest Store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Can You Say "Alice Advocates Alluring Alliums"?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Alice advocates alluring alliums, and so do I!

Well, it's that time year; time to start planting those Alliums, like onions, chives, garlic, shallots and leeks. Did you know Allium, the onion genus, has over 700 species, making it one of the largest plant genera in the world.

I love planting alliums for their flowers as well as their bulb vegetable. They are amazing specimen plants in the garden, and if you don't mind the smell, these umbel shaped blooms might become one of your favorite flowers too. Whether fresh-cut or dried, they are a favorite of flower arrangers as well. Alliums come in so many different colors from, pinks, yellows and whites, to blues and purples.

There are so many Alliums highly recommended for decorative purposes, so why not enjoy their unique blossoms and fragrance in the garden as well as grow them for food. These bulbs are among the easiest of all vegetables to grow and most of them store well, so it is not difficult to maintain a year-around supply.

 

But, some of my favorites Alliums grown for their flowers include:

Blue of the Heavens (Allium azureum) for its small summer blossoms in the purest cornflower blue.

Chives (Allium schoenoprasum) for their short, fluffy, pinkish-lavender blossoms and edible use.

Ornamental Onion ( Allium giganteum) which can reach 4 feet with very large violet balls highly prized in the bouquet.

Lily Leek (Allium moly) for the half-shady garden, its foot high spring yellowy-gold umble flowers can't be beat.

Blue Globe (Allium caerueum) for its production dense clusters of bright blue flowerheads up to 1 inch wide.

Daffodil Garlic (Allium neapolitanum) this heirloom has been grown since the 1800's for its fragrant smell and purest white globes.

So try growing some of these "Flowering Onions", because they are exotic, unique and great fun. 


As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Oh My.....Tomatillo

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Tomatillos are perhaps one of my favorite and most prized fruits. They're not only fun to grow (as they are incredibly beautiful plants) but they are rich in flavor and yummy to eat.

This native of Mexico, which is much like a tomato, dates back to at least 800 B.C. and has for a long time been cultivated there, but has never really caught on elsewhere. For a plant which is so rich in flavor, productive and easy to grow, this is surprising. In Mexican cuisine the tomatillo is important, replacing tomatoes which have come to be used in their place in other countries, particularly in salsa or other sauces for meat. I love how they impart a unique tanginess which tomatoes never quite attain.

The tomatillo is a member of the Solanaceae family (the nightshades: tomato, potato, eggplant, ect.) and should be taken into account for your crop rotation plan. Physalis ixocarpa and phladelphica are the most common varieties grown but there are several. Most nurseries sell Physalis ixocara as the principal Tomatillo species. But, you can find many varieties of seeds which may include large yellow or green fruits as well small purple ones.

If you have never grown tomatillos before just remember that they are sun loving, warm weather crops and love the heat. You'll want to choose a site that gets full sun and has well-drained soil that’s not too rich. A pH reading that’s close to neutral (7.0) is good for them. Simply water and feed while fruits are forming. I pick my tomatillos as soon as they are large enough to be useful and continue picking until frost.

So for those of us who are picking our tomatillos right now (and I say this in pure excitement!) thank goodness there are so many ways to use this abundance of fruit. I myself enjoy salsas, verdes, fried, or any where I want some tang.

Here is a simple and delicious recipe for Tomatillo Jam - Enjoy!

 Tomatillo Jam

  • 3 cups cleaned tomatillos
  • 1/2 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 7 1/2 cups organic sgar, measured into separate bowl
  • 1/2 teaspoon organic butter (optional)
  • 2 bags of powdered fruit pectin
  1. Follow basic instructions for Jam making. (cleaning jars and preparing canner)
  2. Finely chop or grind tomatillos. Measure exactly three cups into saucepot and add lemon juice.
  3. Stir in sugar, add butter if desired, (this reduces foaming) and bring mixture to full rolling boil on high heat, stirring constantly.
  4. Stir in pectin and return to full rolling boil and boil for one minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and skim off any excess foam.
  5. Ladle jam quickly into clean jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of tops. Wipe, seal and place into canner. Water must cover jam jars by at least and inch.
  6. Cover and bring to gentle boil. Process 10 minutes. Remove jars and allow to completely cool. After cooling, check for proper seal, if lid springs back refrigeration is necessary.
This is the perfect spread across Chili Scones or homemade Corn Tortillas.

 

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Very Interesting Veggies

Jessica Morgan, M.H. There is a sense of excitement that comes from growing something new in your garden each year. Why not explore your creative side and plant something unusual this year. I've put together some extraordinary vegetables with unusual flavors that will be worth the extra effort it takes to find these magnificent plants.

  • Asparagus Bean, also know as yard-long bean. A beautiful addition to any vegetable garden, and as good to eat as they are strange to behold. Easy to grow, produces abundantly, and has a pleasing taste all their own.
  • Borage is not the prettiest of plants when mature but useful to say the least. Leaves possess a mild, cucumber-like flavor guaranteed to perk up any salad.
  • Burdock doesn't need much water and is easy to grow. Slice the roots up for refreshing, sweetish, unusual aromatic flavor in stir-fry dishes or soups.
  • Chayote is low in calories and high in trace elements plus a good source of fiber. This vegetable pear is a tasty stand in for asparagus, or use it as you would potatoes or French fries.
  • Dandelion is enjoyable all year, and a closer look at its nutritional value should persuade you to do just that.
  • Horseradish root is useful both as food and medicine. Cook as you would parsnips or spice up a pot roast or baked ham. In the spring, the first leaf shoots of the plant can be picked for an unusual and pungent potherb.
  • Jicama tastes very much like water chestnuts, but with a slight hint of sweetness. These tubers can be used in a multitude of ways.
  • Luffa is a member of the cucumber family and is seldom seen growing in America, but spa-bathers and boat scrubbers are undoubtedly familiar with this sturdy "vegetable sponge." Grow some to scrub your veggie's!
  • Nettle if handled with care will make a valuable addition to you garden. Arm yourself with gloves and harvest away.
  • Orach has a mild flavor and contains much less acid than most other types of spinach. Add to quiches, roll up in crepes, toss into soups, or enjoy this delicious vegetable by itself.
  • Rocket is an excellent late crop with the flavor quite distinctive- sharp, spicy, pungent. Enjoy it at its best raw in salads.
  • Salsify has a multitude of uses. These roots can be baked, boiled, fried, or served in soups.
  • Scorzonera is delicious served hot with melted butter or a cream or mushroom sauce. But like Salsify can be baked or fried as well.
  • Sea Kale shoots have a delicate, nutty, slightly bitter flavor. They are yummy when eaten raw with cheese or in salads, or prepared like asparagus.
  • Skirret responds well to interplanting with salad crops such as radishes, onions, and leaf lettuce. Boil these roots up with salt and mash like potatoes.
  • Tomatillo's are the first cousin of the ground cherry. These sticky green berries are the perfect accompaniment to any Mexican dish.
The best part about planting unusual veggies is tracking down the seeds! Love you garden and it will love you!

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Red Clover: Herb, Plant, Food

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Trifolium pratense, or red clover is one of the most useful remedies for children and adults alike, not to mention the tasty treats you can make. If your lucky enough to find this clover growing you’ll want to pick them in the morning just after the dew has dried off. Be sure to select only the fresh, newly opened flowers, and avoid any that look withered or brown. Carefully remove the stems and spread them out on trays. Try not to crowd the blossoms and allow to dry in an airy place, away from direct sunlight. When thoroughly dry, they will be crisp to the touch. Store them away from the light, in tightly closed jars.

This herb is a source of many valuable nutrients including calcium, chromium, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, thiamine, and vitamin C. Red clover is also considered to be one of the richest sources of isoflavones.

These beautiful edible flowers are slightly sweet. You can pull the petals from the flower head and add them to many dishes throughout the summer. A few tiny florets are a delightful addition to a summer iced tea: try serving your summer guests a cup of iced alfalfa mint tea with a slice of lemon and five to ten tiny clover florets floating on top- delicious! Or press the fresh florets into the icing on a summer birthday cake. The raw greens of this plant are very nutritious and can be enjoyed fresh or dried to get the nutrients.

Some of my favorite recipes can be whipped up in a flash.

Red Clover Tea
Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 2 Tbsp fresh or dried red clover herb. Let steep about 5 minutes, strain, and serve with honey.

Red Clover Lemonade

  • 4 cups fresh Red Clover blossoms
  • 1 gallon water
  • 2 cups Red Clover honey
  • 1-1/2 cups fresh squeezed lemon juice

Gently simmer Clover blossoms in a covered pot for 10 minutes. Add honey, stirring until it dissolves. Cover and let steep and cool for several hours or overnight. Then add lemon juice and chill in the fridge.

Red Clover Syrup

  • 1-quart fresh Red Clover blossoms
  • 2 cups Red Clover honey
  • 1 1/2 cups water

Crush blossoms gently, then combine all ingredients. Over low heat, bring to the boil, turn down and simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool. Strain and bottle. This syrup is soothing for coughs and sore throats and makes a pleasant flavoring for tea or pancakes. I hope everyone enjoys these recipes as much as I do. Look for fresh red clover herb and red clover seeds in my Local Harvest Store : Morgan Botanicals.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.;

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Don't Toss It......It's Full Of Nitrogen!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Making and using compost is not only a life-changing experience, but it is the world's best soil conditioner. I use my spent tea leaves as compost for my house plants; cactus, succulents, and herbs, plus I toss them in the garden. Tea leaves are full of Nitrogen, which is always needed for the healthy growth in plants. Its been known that by putting them in the soil that it helps with color development in flowers too, especially in red varieties.

I throw all my spent leaves either in the compost bin or directly on the garden as mulch. Both are very beneficial.

Using tea compost on your garden means:

    * You’ll spend less time weeding and watering your garden

    * You’ll need to use less artificial fertilizer in your garden

    * Your soil will be healthier, so you’ll grow healthier plants

    * You’ll save time and money

    * You’ll be keeping green waste out of landfill

 

All Morgan Botanicals loose-leaf teas, baths and soaks are compostable, it’s even on the labels! Look for Morgan Botanicals herbal products here at Local Harvest. So next time you buy tea, whether loose leaf or in tea bags, don’t forget to toss it in the garden. Does any one use their brewed leaves for anything interesting? I would love to hear your comments.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

 
 
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