Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
Herbal Information and Recipes
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Morgan Botanicals is offering All Loose Herbs at 20% off!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

  Happy Holidays from Morgan Botanicals!

 

What are you crafting up for the Holidays.......Morgan Botanicals is offering All Loose Herbs at 20% off! Stuff stockings, give your own tea blends or get yourself something special, just for you.

 

Morgan Botanicals carries a variety of herbs and spices. What herbs we don’t grow or ethically wildharvest, we purchase from reputable organic growers. Whether you're looking for a small amount of herbs or just want to get to know one that you're unfamiliar with, you can find many of them here in convenient one ounce bags.

 We use FDA food safe bags, and our labels are from 100% recycled paper.

 

 

This offer is valid only on my website www.morganbotanicals.com

Loose Herbs 20% Off!

 


 

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

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Copyright 2011. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 


 

 
 

More Mullein Please!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Since antiquity, mankind has used the velvety mullein plant for many purposes. From Roman times, the stem- stripped of the leaves and flowers and dipped in tallow- was carried as a torch in religious processions. Why not make a giant torch eh? Well, they are smoky, stinky, and tend to drip hot flaming bits everywhere ...... Perfect for a cave? Maybe.

Mullein was known in Greek as Flego and Fluma, that is, "to set on fire." According to one writer, "it served as a wick to put into lamps to burn." The leaves were rolled and dried and used as wicks for oil lamps and candles, and made excellent tinder. John Parkinson, a seventeenth-century herbalist, "used the stalks dipped in suet whether to burn at funerals or otherwise, and so likewise the English name High Taper, used in the same manner as a taper or torch."

To me, mullein is an awkwardly beautiful, tall fuzzy plant with sweet smelling yellow flowers and typically blooms from March to November. The flowers are fragrant and taste sweet, and the leaves, even though a bit bitter, are still wonderfully useful. Apart from its medicinal use, I love mullein for its ornamental purpose in the garden; it attracts a wide variety of pollinators, including bees, flies, and butterflies. Mullein is widely available in the wild, and is easily identified by its spike of yellow flowers and huge, sometimes over a foot long, leaves. When you find them - the leaves, flowers, and roots of this plant are edible and easy to dry, and may be used to make your own herbal medicines.

Mullein has long been valued as a superior medicinal herb and the Greek physician-herbalist Dioscorides was one of the first to recommend its use in curing diseases of the lungs, and it remained thus employed for more than 1,800 years. The leaves, root, and the flowers are anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, demulcent, diuretic, emollient, expectorant, nervine, and vulnerary. What an amazingly useful plant...right? Well, Mullein leaf is a good respiratory remedy and traditionally used as a tea for treating a wide range of chest complaint including cough. When combined with water, the fiber in mullein produces a slippery substance called mucilage, which coats and soothes the throat and intestines. It combines well with other expectorants such as coltsfoot and thyme. Mullein helps reduce inflammation while stimulating fluid production and thus facilitating expectoration. It is considered a specific in bronchitis where there is a hard cough with soreness. Its anti-inflammatory and demulcent properties indicate its use in inflammation of the trachea and associated conditions.

 

The dried leaves are sometimes smoked to relieve the irritation of the respiratory mucus membranes an will ease the hacking cough of consumption. In our own country, several native American tribes used Mullein to cure chest diseases. Since the plant was not native to America, this usage was probably received by them (no doubt along with the lung ailments it was said to cure) from the early settlers. The Navajos called Mullein "big tobacco." They mixed it with regular tobacco and smoked the combination to relieve coughing spasms. It was also believed that this remedy would cure simple mental diseases, the use of evil language, and the thinking of evil thoughts.

But for me....I like it in tea. I like to steep a couple teaspoons of dried mullein in a cup of hot water for an infusion to treat cough, congestion, or diarrhea. You can drink three cups of hot mullein tea a day until symptoms disappear, or store the tea in the refrigerator.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2011. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Medicinal Apples From The Farm?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

It is apple season at the Morgan Family farm "Apple of the Earth Farm" and since the trees are spilling their medicine, now is the time to stock up.  Apples are such an amazing food medicine and actually have tremendous medicinal value. A fresh apple is not only an ideal snack, but it's easy to carry, flavorful, filling, and a good source of fiber. Of course we all know this, but, did you know that apples have medicinal value?

Everyone has heard the saying, "an apple a day keeps the doctor away."  Well it's true, apples are good preventative medicine. Whether internally, externally, fresh or cooked, apples not only maintain health, but help detoxify the body. In fact, they're so good for us that we should eat them everyday! Apples are rich in fiber, tons of vitamins and minerals, especially potassium, which is a big part of the electrolyte balancing process, and are relatively low in calories.

A raw apple is one of the easiest of foods for the stomach to deal with, the whole process of its digestion is completed within hours. The acids of the apple itself are helpful in digesting other foods as well. The sugar of a sweet apple, like most fruit sugars, is practically a predigested food, and is quickly passed through the bloodstream to provide energy and warmth for the whole body. Applesauce is even gentler on the stomach than a whole apple, and can be used for a variety of stomach problems. Apple tea is a great way to get a quick concentration into your body, and dried apples are not only yummy but are a substitute for fresh ones.  Even the bark has been used in decoction for fevers.

Apples are great for both constipation and diarrhea. The fiber in apples is gentler than wheat fiber, and in general, apples help normalize the digestive system. Another great use for apples is as part of a detox or cleansing regimen. Since they are rich in soluble fiber, it makes them a good choice while undergoing fruit and juice fasts. Apples, as food and tea,  are also used to help with blood pressure. Cooked apples make a good local application for sore throats,  fevers, and eye inflammation.

Apples have long been called nature's toothbrush as they are an excellent dentifrice. This perfect food not only cleanses the teeth with its juices, but it also pushes back the gums so that the borders are cleared of food deposits.

Everybody can get fresh medicinal apples - we just need to eat them more. Hooray for the coming apple season!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.comherbalist@morganbotanicals.comherbalist@morganbotanicals.comThis e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Boneset: Is It A Silly Name For A Fever Herb?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

People often ask me "Why such a silly name for a fever herb?" So, I'm clearing up this matter right away: the name boneset implies that this plant is used to treat broken bones, but actually has nothing to do with that, well.......not really. The names of plants often reveal useful information about them, but they can also be very misleading. With a name like boneset, you are likely to lead one astray since the plant was traditionally used in the treatment of fevers, not to mend broken bones. However, with a quick understanding of how the name came to be, it all makes a little more sense.

Boneset's name comes from its traditional use as a treatment for "breakbone fever," an old term for dengue fever. Dengue is a mosquito-borne, viral disease that causes muscle pains so intense that people imagined their bones were breaking, hence its traditional name.

As one of early America's foremost medicinal plants, boneset today has been pushed aside and simply regarded as a weed with a somewhat interesting past. The Indians introduced this native perennial to early Colonists as a sweat-inducer, a beneficial treatment for fevers. The Indians used boneset for all fever-producing illnesses: influenza, cholera, dengue, malaria, and typhoid. Appropriately, but somehow less used, boneset's original common names were feverwort and sweat plant. This forgotten wild flower is known to treat minor viral and bacterial illnesses as well by revving up the immune system's response to infection and initiate profuse sweating. When you run a fever, and employ herbs that cause the body to sweat, the sweat itself helps cool the body down naturally as well as open the pores and restore circulation. The Indians knew this all to well and I'd say we are lucky to have been introduced to this herb that was used for centuries by indigenous North Americans.

Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum) was listed as a treatment for fever in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia from 1820 through 1916, and in the National Formulary, the pharmacists' manual, from 1926 through 1950. It had no equal as a cough, cold and fever remedy during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. But over time it fell from favor, replaced by another fever fighter, Aspirin.

Traditionally, boneset is taken as a tea using the leaves and flowering tops. To prepare a tea, infuse 1 Tbsp. herb in a cup of boiled water and allow to steep, covered, for ten to fifteen minutes. Drink half cup every 2-3 hours. It's pretty bitter and well, kinda gross, but very effective and well worth the effort. Boneset also has the ability to loosen phlegm and promote productive removal which makes it a beneficial herb for colds.

A favorite tea that I use and like to call 'Fever Break Tea', is a personal blend of Elder Flower, Yarrow, Peppermint and Boneset. Then wrap up warm and allow the herbs to do their magic.

***Please keep in mind that boneset should be taken for acute conditions and for a limited amount of time, as long term use can cause degeneration of the liver and kidneys. However, it is still far safer than Acetaminophen and tastes equally as bad- so I personally will choose the boneset cure.

If you're looking for Boneset or other quality herbs, check here on my site morganbotanicals.com or in my Local Harvest store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Fan me on Facebook - Morgan Botanicals

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

 

 
 

Strawberry Is More Than Just A Berry

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

Along with new life, new leaves and new blooms, fresh herbs are in abundance in Spring. For me, this is the time to start collecting leafy herbs like strawberry leaf for storage. The garden strawberry is the most common plant of the genus Fragaria which is cultivated worldwide in the garden for its fruit. Although there are several varieties of wild strawberries, all of the species do have similar herbal properties, but mainly the leaves and rhizomes are used for this purposes. If left alone, this easy to grow perennial will successfully propagate itself and leave you with an abundance of perfectly usable parts.

The medicinal value of strawberry leaf is similar to that of its cousin, the red raspberry which are both rich in tannins, vitamin C and are known to posses diuretic and astringent qualities. Herbalists also regard the leaf as a tonic for the female reproductive system, using it in exactly the same way as raspberry. I like to recommend strawberry leaf tea to both pregnant and nursing mothers as well as young children due to the high contents of calcium, trace minerals and iron. The tea is almost as yummy as the berry, being fresh, mild and fruity.

Strawberry leaf tea has been used to treat a multitude of symptoms from eczema to stomach disorders. The tannins in the leaves are a gentle remedy for diarrhea, intestinal and urinary complaints. Use the leaves in the bath water for soaking away aches and pains. The tea is also used for healthy teeth, gums and bones. Strawberry leaf has been known to help heal wounds, scar tissue, and fractures; plus build resistance to infection, and aid in the prevention and treatment of the common cold.

I harvest the young leaves throughout the spring and summer, but particularly during blossoming for the finest flavor, and the roots in autumn which are dried for later use. It's important to collect only the best leaves since it's common for the plant to have leaf blight, mold or fungus. Also, keep in mind that strawberry leaf may cause allergic reactions in people hypersensitive to strawberries, so don't use if you have known allergy's to this plant.

For a simple tea, drop a handful of fresh or 2 tsp dried herb into a teapot and pour boiling water over to fill. Cover and steep for five minutes. Sweeten with honey if needed. 


If you're looking for loose leaf, you can buy Dried Strawberry Leaf here in my Local Harvest store.

As always, email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.


 
 

Juniper Berries: The Forgotten Food and Medicine

 

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Juniper Berries, scientifically called Juniperus communis, come from the Juniper shrub and are widely found throughout the Northern Hemisphere. The juniper is an evergreen tree native to Europe, Asia, and the northern parts of North America.

The herbal uses of the juniper berry dates back to early times. The first recorded mention of use is in an Egyptian papyrus from 1500 B.C.E. that tells of its use in treating tapeworms. Throughout history, Juniperus communis has been used by numerous different cultures to treat conditions such as warts, gout, skin growths, upset stomach,  and various urinary tract and kidney diseases.  It's been noted that Greek and Arabian physicians used juniper to treat many ailments as well as the Romans, who used it for all types of stomach disorders. Native Americans of the northeast used the berries as a food and medicinal herb used to relieve infection and ease the pain of arthritis. The Hopi boiled the berries and parts of the tree and consumed it to treat stomach disorders. Historically, juniper berries have been used to treat bladder and kidney infections and were used in tea as a way to disinfect surgeon's tools. The antiseptic properties of juniper berry helps aid in the removal of waste and acidic toxins from the body, and stimulate a fighting action against bacterial and yeast infections. Considered by some to be a useful diuretic, juniper has been used to remove excess water retention, which can help with water weight loss, as well as improving digestion and easing gas and stomach cramping without causing loss of electrolytes. Additionally, the berries are believed by some herbalists to be beneficial for reducing congestion and relieving asthma and colds.

The purple, blue, violet, or blackish-brown fruits are harvested in early autumn for culinary and medicinal use. To prevent loss of essential oil, juniper berries should not be ground, crushed, or rubbed until just before use. When added to food, juniper berries can help prevent gas and heartburn. Find dried Juniper Berries here.

**Continued overdose can cause renal irritation and blood in the urine, so only use in moderation. Since juniper berries can stimulate uterine contractions, avoid use during pregnancy. They should not be used by anyone who has inflammation of the kidneys.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Do These Pants Make My Rosehips Look Big?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Rosehips are a wonderful food and vitamin source.  Historically, Native Americans used rosehips in their stews and soups after using them for tea. I enjoy using them to make jams, jellies, marmalade's and wine, as well as a delicious tea. 

This nutrient rich herb boosts your health and helps shed pounds in so many ways. As a tea and wine, rosehips strengthen the body, reinforce digestive function, help flush the kidneys and urinary tract, plus stimulate the appetite and increase blood flow and circulation.

I find Rosehip tea to be deliciously tart, refreshing and yummy, plus I love that they contain vitamins A, B, C, E and K, pectin and organic acids. Pectin has the amazing ability to bind waste in our intestines; bonding with fats and cholesterol before they can be absorbed into the blood, aiding in removal of unwanted fats from the body. Rosehips can help lower cholesterol and gently regulate elimination. This gentle diuretic also helps the body eliminate accumulations of water in the tissues.  How can you go wrong?

So let us stop worrying about how our hips look in jeans, and just enjoy our rosehips!

For Yummy Tea: Simmer 4 tablespoons of rosehips for 30 minutes in 1 quart of water and strain. Drink 2 cups of the tea daily.

For Yummy Wine: Steep 3 1/2 ounces of dried rose hips in 1 quart of strong, dry red wine for 2 weeks. Filter the wine. Drink 2 small glasses per day.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2010. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

 
 

Basil: The Beneficial Medicinal

 

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Basil, beyond being one of my most valued culinary herbs, is also one of my most valued medicinal herbs. Basil is known to be a great source of vitamin K, calcium, and other nutrients, as well as being abundant in antioxidants.

There are many different varieties of basil used for their medicinal and culinary attributes, but two of my favorites are the simple garden basil (Ocimum basilicum), and Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum) also known as Tulsi. Ancient cultures have long used basil to treat various stomach and respiratory problems.

Basil Leaf (Ocimum basilicum) is known to impart sedative, diuretic and antiseptic properties.  The essential oil content of basil helps in the treatment of gastro-intestinal and renal affections, bronchitis and fever. It is also beneficial to the heart, as it helps reduce cholesterol. The herb is safe for children to take, and can help chicken pox to hurry through its course. It's leaves can be chewed to relieve mouth infections. Powdered dried leaves can be used to brush the teeth, which freshens the breath, cleans the teeth and stimulates the gums. A simple cup of tea can help with headaches. The use of basil leaf tea is also recommended in nervous system fatigue, insomnia and painful menstruation. Fresh basil leaf compresses are useful to aid the unpleasant effects of insect stings. 

Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum) contains hundreds of compounds known as phyto-chemicals that work together to create strong anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and immune-enhancing properties. Often used to treat cough, sore throat, rash, stings, night blindness, hives, ear infections and fever. Leaves contain a tonic for the nerves and can improve memory. It helps to remove phlegm from the bronchial tubes and strengthens the stomach. Leaves can be chewed to aid colds and flu. One with kidney stones would benefit from basil as it is known to help expel stones from the urinary tract.

Consuming the warm brew of basil herbal tea can promote a more balanced metabolism, build stamina, and increase mental clarity. It is recommended to drink a cup after every meal.

If you're looking for loose leaf, you can buy Dried Basil Leaf and Dried Holy Basil here in my Local Harvest store.

As always, email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

 
 

Yummy Yummy Sheep Sorrel

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Sheep Sorrel is one of my favorite "weeds". It's an ubiquitous weed in gardens, pastures, meadows, and lawns; and persists in areas of poor drainage and low soil fertility; in gravelly sterile fields; and is very difficult to eradicate. But, well worth planting in the garden!

Rumex acetosella has many common names, but the most common are sheep sorrel, red sorrel, and field sorrel. Flowers are typically yellow to red with male and females on different plants. Sheep sorrel is a small to medium sized plant; not taking up too much room in the garden.

There are several uses of sheep sorrel in the preparation of food including a garnish, a tart favoring agent and a curdling agent for cheese, in pesto, soups and omelett recipes. The leaves have a lemony, tangy/ tart flavor and are excellent in a salad.

Here's one of may favorite recipes for Sheep Sorrel Pesto

  • 2 cups coarsely chopped fresh sorrel leaves with ribs removed
  • 1/3 cup packed fresh parsley leaves
  • 2 garlic cloves roughly chopped
  • 1/3 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 1/2 teaspoon good salt
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
Simply puree all ingredients in a food processor or blender and transfer the pesto to a jar with a tight fitting lid and chill it, covered. The pesto keeps, covered and chilled, for 2 weeks.
Makes about 1 cup

A tea made from the stem and leaves can be made to act as a diuretic. It also has certain astringent properties and uses. Other historical uses include that of a vermifuge  as the plant allegedly contains compounds toxic to intestinal parasites and worms.

Looking for seeds? You can buy Sheep Sorrel Seeds here in my Local harvest Store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Horsetail -The Healing Stems

 

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I am particularly lucky to have Horsetail growing in abundance in my area. It's rarely cultivated since it is difficult to eradicate once established, but if you plant it in buckets to prevent it from spreading, you can successfully grow a small crop. Horsetail certainly makes a stunning presence in any garden, and is a useful addition to say the least. If you want to grow your own Equisetum arvense, it is best propagated in fall by division of mature plants. Horsetail has been declared a noxious weed in some areas, but I am always excited to see it prospering in the wild. 

Horsetail, or Shavegrass as it is often called, is a primitive spore bearing, grass-like perennial with hollow stems that seem to be impregnated with silica.  Today's horsetail is a shiny grass growing 4-18 inches in height, but in prehistoric times it grew as big as trees. According to myth, if you find horsetail growing in a field, it means there is underground water or a spring below.

Because the stems contain such a large amount of silica, (which is used by the body in the production and repair of connective tissues and accelerates the healing of broken bones) it is a great choice for tissue repair. Other than a fantastic wound healer it is a valuable astringent, diuretic, styptic and tonic.

I find it interesting to know that Horsetail is not only a rich source of Silica and Calcuim, but also Vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B5, C, E, Selenium, Magnesium, Potassium, Phosphorus, Iron, Manganese, Sodium, Chlorine, Zinc, Cobalt, Gold, Silver, Platinum, Rhodium- Alkaloids (including Nicotine), Saponins, Tannins, Flavonoids, and Phytosterols. There's alot going on in this herb!

One of my favorite herbal tea blends that  provides minerals for strong bone growth for the entire body is simple and tasty. All of these herbs are nutritious and are a good sources of absorabable calcium, magnesium, iron, and other important trace minerals. I recommend two to three cups a day as a gentle bone-building tonic. You can find all of these loose leaf herbs in my Local Harvest Store.

2 parts oatstraw

2 part nettle

1 part horsetail

1 part red clover

1 part rosehips

1 part violet leaves

Horsetail is not only a great medicinal herb for tissue repair, but also nosebleeds, lung weakness, kidney health, eyelid swelling, bleeding gums and prostate and urinary tract health.

It's also a good tea for postmenopausal women to keep their hair, skin, and nails in fit shape as the Silica and Calcium strengthen brittle nails; give life to dull, dry hair, and restore skin tissue.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Medicinal Apples From Our Farm?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I've been spending the last couple of weeks thinning the three acre apple orchard from the Morgan Family Farm. Apples are such an amazing food medicine and actually have tremendous medicinal value. A fresh apple is not only an ideal snack, but it's easy to carry, flavorful, filling, and a good source of fiber. Or course we all know this, but did you know that apples have medicinal value?

Everyone has heard the saying, "an apple a day keeps the doctor away."  Well it's true, apples are good preventative medicine. Whether internally, externally, fresh or cooked, apples not only maintain health, but help detoxify the body. In fact, they're so good for us that we should eat them everyday! Apples are rich in fiber, tons of vitamins and minerals, especially potassium, which is a big part of the electrolyte balancing process, and are relatively low in calories.

A raw apple is one of the easiest of foods for the stomach to deal with, the whole process of its digestion is completed within hours. The acids of the apple itself are helpful in digesting other foods as well. The sugar of a sweet apple, like most fruit sugars, is practically a predigested food, and is quickly passed through the bloodstream to provide energy and warmth for the whole body. Applesauce is even gentler on the stomach than a whole apple, and can be used for a variety of stomach problems. Apple tea is a great way to get a quick concentration into your body, and dried apples are not only yummy but are a substitute for fresh ones.  Even the bark has been used in decoction for fevers.

Apples are great for both constipation and diarrhea. The fiber in apples is gentler than wheat fiber, and in general, apples help normalize the digestive system. Another great use for apples is as part of a detox or cleansing regimen. Since they are rich in soluble fiber, it makes them a good choice while undergoing fruit and juice fasts. Apples, as food and tea,  are also used to help with blood pressure. Cooked apples make a good local application for sore throats,  fevers, and eye inflammation.

Apples have long been called nature's toothbrush as they are an excellent dentifrice. This perfect food not only cleanses the teeth with its juices, but it also pushes back the gums so that the borders are cleared of food deposits.

Everybody can get fresh medicinal apples - we just need to eat them more. Hooray for the coming apple season!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.


 
 

Sweet Lemon Balm......I'm In Love!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I have several lemon balm plants growing right outside my kitchen window, and I just love the wafting lemon scent that flows into the house. This easy to grow herb thrives in any sunny, well drained location. Both the foliage and the flowers are attractive in the garden and the small white flowers attract honeybees and other beneficial insects.  I love to add fresh leaves to salads, soups, herbal vinegars, and fish. A simple cup of lemon balm tea is delicious too. If using the fresh leaves for tea, the leaves lowest on the plant are the highest in essential oils. In pastures this plant increases the flow of cows' milk, and is excellent with marjoram after calving. You can grow your own lemon balm from seeds found here in my local harvest store.

Melissa officinalis is a mint with a distinctly lemony scent. Its botanical name Melissa is Greek for bee, as bees obtain large quantities of honey from the flowers. And  "balm" refers to balsam, the ancient world's most important sweet-smelling oils. For thousands of years herbalists used lemon balm to treat any kind of disorder of the central nervous system.

Lemon balm is an excellent carminative herb that relieves spasms of the digestive tract and is often used internally for indigestion, flatulent dyspepsia and chronic gastrointestinal disorders. I like to recommend combining lemon balm with hops or chamomile for digestive troubles.

Because of its antidepressant properties, lemon balm is a good choice for anxiety or depression, as the gentle sedative oils relieve tension and stress. For stress and tension it combines well with lavender and lime blossom. Balm also has a tonic effect on the heart and circulatory system, thus lowering blood pressure. If you looking for fresh dried herbs you can buy lemon balm leaf here in my local harvest store.

Herbalists often use lemon balm to treat viral infections of the skin, especially herpes, both genital herpes and cold sores. Although it wont eliminate the flare-ups, it helps relieve itching, and will help lesions heal. Lemon balm is useful, both medicinal and culinary and is a wonderful herb for just about anyone, including pregnant moms and children.

This beautifully fragrant herbs is one of my favorites and I guarantee it will be one of your favorites too!

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Running Around Looking For Horehound

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Marrubrium vulgaris is one of the first non-native herbs I learned when I was working as field biologist for Cal State Stanislas to protect native species. I knew the plant as a cough remedy and a candy, but didn't have much experience recognizing the plant back then. In college as a horticulture student we studied landscaping plants rather than "wild" plants; which is truly where my heart was. But none the less, I learned alot.

 Horehound is a perennial weed and member of the mint family. It's commonly found in disturbed, low-elevation areas throughout California. One plant can produce thousands of seeds, become very dense quickly, and is resistant to trampling. It is often times found flourishing on roadsides. In an ornamental landscape, this aromatic herb will attract bees to your garden.

Horehound is an amazing plant and useful to say the least. It is an excellent pectoral remedy for cough and colds, bronchitis, and sore throats as well as helping with unwanted phlegm in the chest. Horehound tea alone is effective for the common cold but I like to mix it with marshmallow and licorice root and make a syrup.

Beyond being an expectorant, it is a bitter tonic, diuretic, resolvent, diaphoretic, and laxative. A warm cup of tea will produce perspiration and urine flow; helps with asthma, jaundice, and hoarseness. A cold infusion is a great tonic for dyspepsia, and the powdered leaves are used as a vermifuge. Taken in large doses, it is laxative and will expel worms.

For harvesting and storing: The first year, cut the foliage sparingly. The second year, harvest leaves when flower buds appear, chop and dry them, then store in airtight containers. If you don't know this herb, you should- it's easy to fall in love with.

As always, email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Are You Nervous About Hops? Well Don't Be!

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Whether you're young or old, rich or poor, everyone experiences insomnia at one time or another. Why use over the counter sedatives when there is a safe alternative? So insomniacs, us herbalists have the answer - Hops. Hops or (Humulus lupulus) is commonly paired with chamomile, valerian, or lavender but easily holds its own as a natural relaxing sedative. The dried strobiles, can be made into teas, tinctures, capsules, and tablets. I prefer the tea as is takes effect much quicker.

 Hops is considered by herbalists to be one of the most calming and relaxing herbs known to mankind. Of course there is an array of relaxing herbs out there, but hops is proven to be one of the safest and most effective. I like to use hops internally for insomnia, nervous tension, anxiety and for those with irritable bowel syndrome. Hops is bitter, but tolerable; besides, your going to see results quickly.

Externally, hops works wonders on eczema, herpes and ulcers. A pillow stuffed with hops is said to be relaxing, and will calm nervous conditions as well. I like using it in the bath for total relaxation for myself and my kids. Try Ready To Relax to help relieve stress and tension.

 I have to admit thought, this vine is spectacular just growing. Just its presence relaxes me. I could not live with out all my hops vines. I wouldn't trade my other herbs for it - I just couldn't live without it! Everyone should should grow hops in their yard.

If your looking for fresh dried hops you can find it here in my Local Harvest Store.

 Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Beneficial Herbs for Menopause

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 "There is no more creative force in the world than the menopausal woman with zest"

-Margaret Mead

There are many wonderful herbs to help women comfortably transition into their menopausal years. Both Western and Chinese herbs are available which mimic the hormonal effects of both estrogen and progesterone within the body. These herbs "trick" the body into thinking it's getting the hormones. If you suffer from any of the associated symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, lowered libido, memory issues, vaginal dryness, palpitations, night sweats, weight gain, depression and irritability- there are great herbs out there.

Here is a list of some easily accessible herbs.

Black cohosh- beneficial for hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, vaginal dryness, prolapsed uterus and bladder, phytoestogen effects.

Motherwort- beneficial for palpitations, hot flashes, sloughing of the lining, phytoestogen effects.

False unicorn- beneficial for vaginal and uterine atrophy, and menstral irregularities.

Wild yam- beneficial for muscle and menstrual cramps, prevents bone loss, regulates PMS and depression.

Vitex-  benifical for water retention, depression, uterine fibroids, breast lumps, menstral flooding, and skin breakouts.

Dang gui- nourishes and build blood, hot flashes, irregular cycle, and vaginal dryness.

Nettles -helps with water retention, weight gain, strengthens bones (high in Calcium)

Oatstraw-  relieves tension, nervousness, insomnia, and builds bones (high in Calcium)

Black haw- beneficial for menstrual cramps and pain, flooding or excessive bleeding.

Kava kava- beneficial for tension, anxiety, and insomnia.

Ginseng- beneficial for tiredness, poor memory and concentration, anxiety, insomnia, and low libido.

Asparagus root- helps strengthens female hormones

Solomon's seal- builds reproduction secretions and aids vaginal dryness.

Epimedium- helps with hot flashes, night sweats, headaches, dizziness, and light headedness.

Along with taking herbs it is important maintain certain dietary guidelines to help alleviate menopause symptoms naturally. I like to suggest proper protein intake, whole grains and legumes, consuming lots of fresh locally grown vegetables and fruits as well as other phytoestrogenic and calcium rich food and herbs.

Are you looking for an all natural treatment for menopause? Look for my Women's Health Herbal Menopause Tea and Flash Calm Herbal Menopause Tea here in my Local Harvest Store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

 Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.





 
 
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