Morgan Botanicals

  (Loveland, Colorado)
Herbal Information and Recipes
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Plain Plantain. Or Is It?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.I love seeing little herb gardens of plantain growing in the cracks of people's driveways. These "weeds" are far too often plucked out (just like dandelions) but I have my hopes. Do you ever notice how Mother Nature plops down herbs in the most convenient spots. This mighty strong and stubborn herb isn't that tough by accident you know. Plantain, whether plucked, stomped, pulled or crushed, never seems to die; in fact, it's so resilient, it'll grow where nothing else will. To me- that's a trooper!

Plantain is defiantly one herb that I put at the top of my list as a great remedy for coughs, lung congestion, hoarseness and anything else where excessive mucus is a problem. This particular herb is a good substitute for slippery elm which is disappearing due to irresponsible wild crafting practices, commercial logging, and Dutch elm disease. You can make a simple tea or a syrup (I like to add fresh ginger to my plantain syrup as well) and use whenever a hacking cough starts. Buy fresh dried plantain here.

Plantago is also commonly used internally for diarrhea, cystitis, asthma, hay fever, hemorrhage, catarrh, and sinusitis. As well as externally for eye inflammations, shingles, and ulcers. I often use it to sooth the stings from nettles too.

As a wound healer, plantain is superior. In addition to coagulating blood, the tea or salve has been known to close up even the most stubborn sores. You can even wash skin eruptions and rashes in plain plantain tea as a natural aid. Fresh plantain has been shown to draw out insect poison before it can cause major discomfort.

If you lucky enough to find this "bothersome weed" in your yard (and I'm sure you might) you can also use the fresh leaves in salads; steam and eat the leaves like spinach - their really quite yummy. What ever you chose to do with your plantain, don't be surprised to know that it is one of the wisest weeds on the block! You can find plantain here in my Local Harvest Store

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

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Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Rosemary For Revitalization

Jessica Morgan, M.H.This woody shrub blooms in spectacular hues, from true blue to rosy blue, and one white-flowering variety. It blooms in spring and sometimes fall with a wonderful aroma that fills the air with a fragrance like sweet pine. Rosemary has a long history of medicinal use, in culinary cuisine, symbolic blessings, and aromatherapy in gardens around the world.

This amazing plant is often used a a tonic, but it also relaxes the nervous system, which helps ease anxiety, depression, and tension headaches. It's antispasmodic properties help to fight lingering bronchial infections and help improve breathing.

Rosemary tea is also an excellent herbal tea to drink for those recovering from an illness or surgery, and especially for seniors. This particular herb gently restores immunity and health. Because of its antioxidants, it prevents cell damage from free radicals. It has no side effects and can be taken regularly. This shrub is antiviral and antimicrobial which helps fight infections, as well as anti-inflammatory which eases inflammation.

Use rosemary tea to brighten your skin and overall glow. Its antiseptic value will improve the skin's ability to resist infection and helps clear up blemishes.

And of course we can forget about slenderness. Rosemary improves the digestion of fats, and keeps wastes from accumulating, including cellulite deposits. This herb is a great choice for weight loss because it enhances the flow of digestive juices.

The whole plant above the root is beneficial fresh or dried. You can find freshly dried Rosemary Leaf in my Local Harvest Store.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Simple Old Lemon Peel Tea

Jessica Morgan, M.H.The simple lemon has gone beyond your ordinary glass of lemonade. Did you know lemon peel contains calcium, phosphorus, potassium, ascorbic acid and vitamin A, as well as volatile oil. It is diuretic, carminative, immuno-enhancing, and stomachic. This citrus serves as a tonic to the digestive system, immune system, and skin, while increasing circulation to extremities. Lemon peel is used to treat and prevent vitamin deficiencies, colds, flu, an scurvy as well as digestive or gastrointestinal problems by stimulating the appetite and encouraging the release of gastric juices to digest food.

The citrus bioflavonoid constituents of this herb help stabilize blood vessels, especially the capillaries, making it an ideal remedy for healing varicose veins, bloodshot eyes, phlebitis and hemorrhoids (especially when the lemon peel is used to make a tea).

According to researchers at the University of Arizona, lemon peel, a good source of calcium, potassium, and Vitamin A, is believed to reduce and prevent certain types of skin cancer. Drinking lemon peel tea by itself or in green tea was found to have more than a 70% reduced risk for skin cell carcinoma. Drinking one cup of hot lemon peel tea 30 minutes before meals several times a day will not only lower skin cancer risk; but also aid in digestion and help prevent stomach irritations.

So don't forget your daily cup of lemon peel tea- you won't regret it! Very convenient, just put one piece of dried lemon peel to a cup of boiling water. Add sugar or honey if you like. Great as iced tea too. Look for dried lemon peel here in my Local Harvest store.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Follow me on Twitter - MorganBotanical

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Cornsilk and Its Medicinal Effect

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Corn silk (Zea mays) is a great herbal remedy for acute inflammation and irritation of the genito-urinary system, such as cystitis, urethritis and prostatitis. It is especially useful in treating inflammation caused by bacterial infection and its volatile oils neutralize fungi and yeast. It is particularly useful for calming bladder irritation and infection in children. Because this herb is a soothing and relaxing diuretic, corn silk clears toxins, catarrh, deposits and irritants out of the kidneys and bladder, plus it has a gentle antiseptic and healing action. The tea is also believed to diminish prostate inflammation and the accompanying pain when urinating.

By reducing fluid retention in the body, corn silk may help reduce blood pressure, and by aiding elimination of toxins and wastes it may relieve gout and arthritis, as well as act as a gentle detoxifying remedy for the system. 

Corn silk makes a good remedy for frequency of urination and bed wetting due to irritation or weakness of the urinary system, and has been used for urinary stones and gravel. Since corn silk is used as a kidney remedy and in the regulation of fluids, the herb is helpful in treating water retention associated with edema.

Corn silk tea  can be made by pouring 1 cup of boiling water over 2 teaspoons of dried corn silk. The mixture is covered and steeped for 10–15 minutes. The tea should be consumed three times daily.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Wild Chamomile Or Pineapple Weed- Call It What You Like

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

I spent last week roaming through the orchard and excitedly plucking this always awaited special herb, pineapple weed. This little weed like plant is closely related to the Chamomiles, Mayweeds, and other weedy daisies. All share the same kind of foliage, but pineapple weed doesn't have the white ray florets in its flower heads that chamomile is known for. 

Matricaria matricarioides or wild chamomile is a favorite of my children as they love to gather it on walks, bruise it then rub it on their skin providing an effective insect repellent.

I love pointing out this jewel of a plant to people. It's similar to chamomile, but sweeter and milder. Pineapple weed is often used for stomachaches and flatulence because of its ability to expel gas from the digestive tract, and is often used as a treatment for diarrhea. This soothing nervine helps to calm the nerves as well as combat insomnia. It is well known as an antispasmodic, carminative, galactogogue, sedative, and skin vermifuge.

I recommend making a weak tea for children with colds, colic, and for teething. Children love the taste and smell which is always a plus when working with kids. When applied externally as a wash, it acts to hinder itching and soothe skin and scalp sores.

Look for fresh dried- home grown pineapple weed in my local harvest store.  And as always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Easy Herbal Healing For Heartburn

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

Heartburn is often associated with indigestion, bloating, and dyspepsia. Most people can take stomach-soothing herbs as teas, and will find that they are as effective and safer then over the counter remedies as well as conventional medicine. When treating indigestion or heartburn, herbs can not only help alleviate the uncomfortable feelings but correct it as well. Look to certain herbs that help to decrease the amount of acid being produced in the stomach, such as chamomile.You also may consider herbs that absorb excess stomach acid such as flax, fenugreek (seeds) and slippery elm.

There are three categories of herbs that are often used to treat heartburn and indigestion: bitters which are digestive stimulants, carminatives which are gas-relieving herbs, and demulcents which are soothing herbs.

When looking for a tea blend such as Heartburn Ease Tea,  look for herbs that improve the digestive process such as mint, chamomile, anise, caraway, coriander, and fennel. These can help the uncomfortable symptoms of heartburn and other stomach problems. Our tea blend is not only tasty but safe for pregnancy as well. Take care!

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

What Can Be Said Wrong About Alfalfa?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.What can be said wrong about Alfalfa? Silly question huh? But really, what can be said?

Alfalfa has been used as a medicinal plant for over 1,500 years. It truly is known as "The Father of all Foods". What other plant could demand such a title? Not many. Alfalfa is high in protein, calcium, Vitamins in the B group, C, D, E and K plus tons of other trace minerals and chlorophyll. Because the root system of alfalfa has the power to grow to magnanimous depths, it is able to store such wonderful properties from the soil that most other plants can't.

There are wild relatives that are found around the world, such as Medicago polymorpha and others, but it is M. sativa that is most known, especially for medicinal use. 

Alfalfa has rich green alternate leaves and  is one of the richest sources of dietary fiber and chlorophyll. Many people use Alfalfa for nutritional needs, since it's been known to stimulate the appetite. Very ill patients often need it because it is easily assimilated and full of nutrients. The ashes of the leaves are 99% pure calcium. Alfalfa detoxifies the body and alkalizes it, and aids in digestion.

With numerous estrogenic qualities, women over the years have used Alfalfa to relieve pain and symptoms associated with their period. This plant can help balance hormones and aids in removing excess water from the body due to its diuretic properties.

Alfalfa is used topically to help heal infections after surgery, or caused from bed sores. It can help in constipation, hemorrhoids and gastritis as well as help the body fights off infection.

Known to reduce cholesterol and aid in preventing heart disease and stroke, Alfalfa has been studied recently for its ability to help diabetic patients who do not respond well to insulin.

I like using alfalfa in capsule form, in tea, and of course in liquid chlorophyll form. 

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Oat straw: Simple Yet Effective

Jessica Morgan, M.H. Avena sativa is one of my favorite herbs for just about anybody. Anyone who is stressed, overworked, or anxious, should include oats as part of a daily health regimen. It is a safe tonic herb for the nervous system. Avena is exceptionally rich in silica, calcium, and chromium and are one of the highest sources of magnesium.

 I highly recommend oat straw tea during pregnancy for calming nervous tension and stress. It is also safe for yeast infections that occur during pregnancy and it is great for varicose veins as the infusion is useful in strengthening the capillaries. If your looking for a great pregnancy tea try Nutritional Herbal Pregnancy Tea.

For children, oat straw is a perfect choice for nighttime unwinding, as well as high in calcium to support growth spurts. Use for children who are nervous, hyperactive, or stressed. Our valuable blend, Teddy Bear Tea is all natural, healthy, and yummy. This tea will become your favorite nighttime ritual.

Take advantage of this simple herb and you'll see how gentle and effective it is. Combine with lemon balm and passionflower for a good nervine, and with valerian as a sleep aid, or with digestive bitters for any liver or digestive upset.

As always, please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Sneezing, Itching, Watering Eyes....... Use Your Nettle

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

For those who have learned to respect its sting and recognize its amazing herbal attributes, stinging nettle truly is one of our most delicious, nutritious and medicinal foods. Even though this plant can offer a crash course in plant identification, as well as contact dermatitis, painful tiny blisters, and possible burning like sensations, (OUCH!) get to know it, nettle has so much to offer.

Besides being very high in iron, calcium, potassium, manganese, and vitamins A, C, and D; it is nutritive, astringent, diuretic, tonic, and antihistamine. Nettle is particularly effective in treating allergic rhinitis, relieving nearly all the symptoms of itchy, watery eyes, sneezing and runny nose. This herb can be taken in the form of tincture, capsule or as I prefer in tea; two or three times daily throughout hay fever season. Some herbalist recommend nettle for dogs that suffer seasonal allergies as well.

The stinging comes from the presence of the histamine in the bristle. This is what delivers a stinging burn when the hairs on the leaves and stems are touched. But, the histamines and histamine-like compounds in nettle seem to be what interferes with the release of histamines produced by the body, thus relieving much of the symptoms that inevitably results from airborne allergens each spring. Combating seasonal allergies really can be as simple as a cup of nettle tea away. Morgan Botanicals offers nettle by the ounce and nettle seed as well as personal blends. If you would like an allergy tea blended please feel free to contact me.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

The Herbal Bath To Soothe and Heal

Jessica Morgan, M.H.The skin is the largest organ in the body. Our skin is absorbent and alive, and everyday it absorbs chemicals from our laundry detergent, bleach, or whatever we put next to our skin. Treat your skin to nourishment by soaking in a medicinal herbal bath. Herbal baths are beneficial to your skin, ease stress, and help soothe aches and pains.

Morgan Botanicals uses fresh organic dried herbs and essential oils that smell wonderful! No artificial ingredients or synthetic fragrances. As you soak with whole herbs and botanicals such as Eucalyptus, Lavender, Spearmint, or Chamomile, you will feel your stress evaporate. Nourish your mind and your body with our line of botanical tea baths. They are hand-blended in small batches to ensure superior quality and optimum shelf life 

We have many herbal bath soak blends specially designed to soothe or relax. All our bath soaks come with a reusable muslin bag. Try our Ready to Relax blend or Simply Sensual.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.;

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 

 
 

Red Clover: Herb, Plant, Food

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Trifolium pratense, or red clover is one of the most useful remedies for children and adults alike, not to mention the tasty treats you can make. If your lucky enough to find this clover growing you’ll want to pick them in the morning just after the dew has dried off. Be sure to select only the fresh, newly opened flowers, and avoid any that look withered or brown. Carefully remove the stems and spread them out on trays. Try not to crowd the blossoms and allow to dry in an airy place, away from direct sunlight. When thoroughly dry, they will be crisp to the touch. Store them away from the light, in tightly closed jars.

This herb is a source of many valuable nutrients including calcium, chromium, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, thiamine, and vitamin C. Red clover is also considered to be one of the richest sources of isoflavones.

These beautiful edible flowers are slightly sweet. You can pull the petals from the flower head and add them to many dishes throughout the summer. A few tiny florets are a delightful addition to a summer iced tea: try serving your summer guests a cup of iced alfalfa mint tea with a slice of lemon and five to ten tiny clover florets floating on top- delicious! Or press the fresh florets into the icing on a summer birthday cake. The raw greens of this plant are very nutritious and can be enjoyed fresh or dried to get the nutrients.

Some of my favorite recipes can be whipped up in a flash.

Red Clover Tea
Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 2 Tbsp fresh or dried red clover herb. Let steep about 5 minutes, strain, and serve with honey.

Red Clover Lemonade

  • 4 cups fresh Red Clover blossoms
  • 1 gallon water
  • 2 cups Red Clover honey
  • 1-1/2 cups fresh squeezed lemon juice

Gently simmer Clover blossoms in a covered pot for 10 minutes. Add honey, stirring until it dissolves. Cover and let steep and cool for several hours or overnight. Then add lemon juice and chill in the fridge.

Red Clover Syrup

  • 1-quart fresh Red Clover blossoms
  • 2 cups Red Clover honey
  • 1 1/2 cups water

Crush blossoms gently, then combine all ingredients. Over low heat, bring to the boil, turn down and simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool. Strain and bottle. This syrup is soothing for coughs and sore throats and makes a pleasant flavoring for tea or pancakes. I hope everyone enjoys these recipes as much as I do. Look for fresh red clover herb and red clover seeds in my Local Harvest Store : Morgan Botanicals.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com.;

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals.

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a health care professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

I Love Herbal Tea, Do You?

Jessica Morgan, M.H."Better to be deprived of food for three days than of tea for one!"

I love tea, whether its just to warm me up, to clear out my lungs, or to sit and swish around in- in the tub of course!. Today I just feel like sharing some of my favorite recipes. Hope you enjoy.

TUMMY TEA: This tea is not only delicious but very effective for stomach ache and indigestion, plus it's safe for children and adults alike, to drink daily.


  • 1 part rose hips
  • 1 part spearmint
  • 1 part dried orange peal
  • 1/2 part star anise
  • 1/8 part licorice root

Combine all herbs in a pot, and cover with boiling water. Stir well, cover, and steep 15 to 20 minutes.

PRETTY BLEND: I love this tea! It is visually gorgeous too! This yummy tea is aromatic and will bring happiness. Drink it hot or iced.

Combine all herbs in a pot, and cover with boiling water. Stir well, cover, and steep 15 to 20 minutes.

FEVER FLUSHER: If you've got a cold or a fever then this is the brew for you. The yarrow in this tea will cause heat flushing, which is good for breaking a fever.

Put echinacea in 1 quart of water and bring to a boil. Simmer, covered, for 20 minutes. Add the rest of the herbs, stir well, cover and steep 15 to 20 minutes. Strain and add honey and lemon, if desired. Drink a lot of it!

I hope everyone enjoys these tea blends as much as I do. Look for these fresh loose leaf herbs and other natural herbal products in my Local Harvest Store : Morgan Botanicals. As always, email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Slimming With Tea

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Many herbs can safely be used for weight loss and provide a natural way to help you lose those excess pounds. Herbal teas will ease digestive disorders, provide increased perspiration, add bulk and cleanse your body; and increase energy, bringing new vitality to your system. Herbs have no calories or fat. But always keep in mind that weight loss involves changing your whole lifestyle.

One must always begin with eating fresh whole foods and sufficient water consumption. I personally enjoy four to six glasses a day, one of which I swirl in a tablespoon of flaxseed.  For those who can’t get down plain water, try adding a squeeze of lemon, lime, or orange juice, or crush up some mint. Eating and living with herbs will bring you a lifestyle that may be more conducive to weight loss. The following list of herbs has been know to aid in weight loss, especially when combined with healthy eating and exercise.

    * Alfalfa - this herb is not only nutritious but also filled with essential amino acids for strength, a cleanser and mild laxative which will help keep your intestinal track in top condition. Mixes great with peppermint.

    * Cayenne - sprinkle cayenne on your food. It contains an ingredient called capsaicin that stimulates saliva, stimulates digestion and increases your metabolism and fat burning safely.

    * Dandelion - A natural diuretic and cleanser with potassium and vitamins. Works gently and naturally to balance your body’s fluids.

    * Calendula - Make this calming floral tea to ease digestive disorders and de-stress your stomach lining and bowels.

    * Oatstraw - A full body tonic with tons of vitamins and minerals. Adds bulk if taken in capsule form.

    * Raspberry - Iced fruit and berry teas will fulfill the need for sweet drinks and sodas- you’ll get fit faster!

    * Sage - Helps increase digestive enzymes and stimulates your liver.

    * Green Tea - This tea is a natural stimulant with the added benefit of vitamin C and flavoniods (compounds that are antioxidants).

    * Ginseng - helps to boost energy and metabolism.

    * Yerba mate - A vitality tea with lots of B vitamins to combat stress. This metabolic stimulant will help your body utilize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

Hope you enjoy your herbal slimming teas! Look for these herbs in my local harvest store: Morgan Botanicals. Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.


Jessica Morgan, M.H

 
 

Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Holistic Answer

Jessica Morgan, M.H. I am frequently asked for custom herbal preparations to help with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Most clients that I have worked with were on conventional medication and were unhappy with their results. Herbs can replace prescription drugs such as Humera, but please consult with your RA doctor before stopping Humera or any prescription drugs, and let them know that you are considering alternative methods. Herbs have been used with outstanding results for RA sufferers, they do however, work much slower, gentler, and efficiently. Consider discussing with your doctor the best way of weaning your body off the current medication and then supplement with herbs and dietary suggestions. This way your body can readjust.

Herbs; internal and external, green tea, great food choices, and yoga are all very good additions to an RA regimen. Fish oils are also good supplements to try for rheumatoid arthritis since they reduce inflammation. Cod liver oil is a good choice.

Some dietary guidelines I like to suggest- avoid sour foods (yogurt, vinegar, oranges, grapefruit, and pickles) as these over-stimulate the liver, causing it to contract tendons and increase pain. Also, avoid acidic foods (citrus, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, potatoes, red meat, excess grains, alcohol, caffeine), which aggravate arthritis.  Maybe research acid/alkaline food balancing.

Some herbal preparations specific to RA and other joint related complaints that I make include teas, balm, baths, liniments, and poultices. These blends can be customized to your specific needs. I would suggest combating RA with internal and external applications simultaneously. Together, your body will be healthier and happier. Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals

Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.


Jessica Morgan, M.H.

 
 

Motherwort Anyone?

Jessica Morgan, M.H.Leonurus cardiaca, or Motherwart, is an interesting herb; not just because its quirky name, but because it has a long history of medicinal uses. This herb is so important that the Japanese have a Motherwart Festival on the ninth day of the nithh month, also known as the “Month of Motherwart Flowers”

The plant and its use as a medicinal herb originated in Central Europe and Asia, although it has long been in use in the North America as well. It is very useful for a variety of ills, and is very nourishing, much like stinging nettle or dandelion. The herb contains the alkaloid leonurine, which is a mild vasodilator and has a relaxing effect on smooth muscles. For this reason, it has long been used as a cardiac tonic, nervine, and an emmenagogue.  

For menopause, use motherwort regularly to: Lessen the severity, frequency, and duration of hot flashes, relieve faintness with flashes, ease stressed nerves, relieve anxiety, and to relieve insomnia and sleep disturbances. An infusion prepared from motherwort may be used as a tonic to treat menopausal symptoms, anxiety, weakness of the heart as well as menstrual pain.

In addition to be a useful remedy for the reproductive system disorders among women, motherwort also possesses properties that invigorate as well as strengthen the cardiac system.

Motherwort calms a rapidly beating heart with readily usable minerals, trace elements, and an alkaloid exceptionally tonifying to the heart (and uterus). It has been known to strengthen the heart, reduce palpitations and tachycardia, while it tonifies the functioning of the thyroid, blood vessels, liver, heart, and uterus.

Please email any questions to herbalist@morganbotanicals.com

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Jessica Morgan, M. H., Morgan Botanicals

Consult your physician before using this herb if you take prescription medication for your heart. Not recommended while pregnant.

 Disclaimer - The information provided in this article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information in this article for self-diagnosis or to replace any prescriptive medication. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem, suffer from allergies, are pregnant or nursing.

Jessica Morgan, M. H.

 
 
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