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All about Barred Rocks Chickens.

The Barred rocks breed of chicken is casually referred to as "rocks" in breeder circles. They're a cold hardy breed that is ideal for small individual farms. They're also a favorite of small backyard flock owners since they double up as great pets too. Their name comes from the odd greyish rock pattern of their feathers. It's eerily similar to rocks with a barred white pattern. This chicken breed is sometimes also referred to as Plymouth Rock. However, it's better to not confuse these two as the name "Plymouth rock" refers to its extended family and not the barred rock variety by itself. Now let's get to know a little more about this unique breed of chicken.

Barred rocks are very hardy birds and can usually adapt to any situation. They also tend to survive cold weather much better. This makes them the bird of choice for small individual farm owners. This quality is important because poultry in flocks keep warm by sticking together but a few chickens in a coop can't survive without being resistant to cold weather. This breed of chicken has an interesting history too. It was first introduced as a breed in England in 1869 following a long process of cross breeding that involved Dominiques, Cochin, Black Javas and probably a couple of other exotic chicken breeds like the Malay and Dorkings.

The Plymouth Rock breed came from the original Barred rocks breed. All varieties of Plymouth rock were produced by crossing the Barred rock breed with other chicken breeds. The Barred Rock is the first and oldest member of the Plymouth Rock family. This chicken breed carries a combination of some of the best farm chicken qualities like docility, hardiness and broodiness. The barred rock chicken is also excellent at producing meat and eggs and is renowned for being a very docile bird that doesn't create much of a ruckus like other chicken breeds do.

By nature, Barred Rocks live quite long. Though they are prized for their egg laying abilities, they also make excellent meat. The hens usually weigh about 3kg while the cock weighs about 3.4kg to 4.3kg. This is a dual purpose bird and is usually either a good layer or a great source of meat. The trademark feature of the barred rock is its bright red face and red earlobes. A single comb of average size marks their crown and their beaks are tipped bright yellow. This breed is usually known for its excellent temparament and docility. They are friendly birds that get along really well with people.

ChickenHousesplus.com carry a wide range of fertile chicken eggs, fertile duck eggs and chicken coops. 

Since Barred rocks are prized for both their meat and eggs, the latter is given more importance. A hen will usually be allowed to live out much of its egg laying days before it is taken for its meat. However, barred rock hens that don't lay many eggs are often consumed as meat very early. The eggs laid by this breed are brownish pink in color and the number of eggs a barred rock hen lays is directly dependent on the strain it comes from. ChickenHousesPlus.com has a large variety of fertile chicken eggs of different breeds, duck eggs, guinea eggs, bantam eggs and chicken egg incubators. We are a one stop shop for all of your backyard chicken needs


What is the Ameraucana Chicken About?

The Ameraucana chicken, which is also spelled out as the Americana
chicken in some cases, is one of the more interesting chickens to grow. It has one of the more attractive designs of any chicken to take a look at.

The Ameraucana chicken was originated out of Chile. It is not clear as to how early the chickens were found but they are believed to be from the early part of the twentieth century. They were first explained to the civilized world in that period of time. The Mapuche Indians of Chile had been raising them for a while. The Ameraucana chicken was eventually harvested and brought into many other parts of the world, particularly the United Kingdom.

The American Poultry Association officially recognizes this breed of chicken in the Miscellaneous class. This is primarily due to its color considerations.

The comb on the chicken is a pea comb. This features a series of ridges that go from the beak to the top of the chicken's head. The middle ridge is higher up than the rest.

The tail will be positioned at a unique angle. It is about forty-five degrees over a horizontal pattern.

The wattles are not very visible. The chickens do have wattles in most cases but they will not be easy to notice.

The earlobes on the Ameraucana chicken are red. They have a pale appearance on the females in this breed.

The color of the chicken can vary. It can be brown, black or blue in most cases. The males tend to have more of an orange tint to them. A silver appearance may be found on a few of these chickens as well. The designs will vary by each chicken.

The feet are white on the bottom. The shanks are also blue and gray in color. The eyes have a red-brown tone to them.

The size of the Ameraucana chicken is relatively small when compared to other chickens. A rooster can be six to seven pounds in weight. A hen will be around five to six pounds.

This breed is a dual purpose breed that is used for eggs and meat alike. It is best suited for egg production though. It can handle about 250 eggs in the course of a single year.

The eggs are especially unique. The chicken will produce eggs that are often blue or green in color.

The meat that is produced off of the chicken will be very scrumptious. It is often compared in quail meat in terms of its flavor.

Finally, the chicken can be calm and quiet and works well in confined spaces. There are some cases where a chicken might become hostile to people who try to handle it. It may also become tough on other chickens. Some males may even try to rape other hens. It is often best to keep this chicken in confinement. It will at least be calm in this environment.

You can find fertile Ameraucana eggs at ChickenHousesPlus.com. We offer chicken eggs, bantam eggs, duck and guinea eggs and even incubators for all kinds of eggs. We offer everything you need in one stop.v
 
 

Storing Your Fertile Chicken Eggs

Here are a few tips for storing Fertile Chicken Eggs.

Any cracked or overly dirty eggs should be removed and not stored as these impurities reduce the chance of a healthy chicken hatching. These eggs also increase the chance of spreading infection to other eggs that may be in the incubator. Do not try to wash any dirty eggs as this can do more damage than good.

Any fertilized egg should be gathered immediately, and placed in proper storage. Ideally fertilized eggs should make their way into an incubator as soon as possible to reduce the risk of spoiling eggs. Be sure to start your incubator 24 hours before placing fertilized eggs inside to ensure the proper temperatures.

Once a chicken egg is fertile it is very important to keep the egg at the right temperature. If the temperature is too cold then the chick may die.  Some recommend keeping fertilized chicken eggs in a cool dry place, other suggest keeping the fertilized chicken eggs wrapped in a towel to maintain warmth. It is very important to not change the temperatures too fast or drastically as this will reduce the chances of the eggs properly hatching.

 
 

Did you know Chicken Eggs with Thick Strong Shells Hatch Better


Did you know Chicken Eggs with thick strong shells hatch better

Fertile chicken eggs with thick and strong shells are known to have a better chance of hatching than the chicken eggs with weak thin shells. How do you know if you have a thick shell? Well you can measure the thickness by floating eggs in a salt solution of various concentrations. Specific gravity of an egg is highly correlated wtih the thickness of the shell.

If you have an egg which looks like it has a lot of pores or clear mottled spots on the eggs those egg are weak. The porosity of the shell determines the rate of moisture loss during incubation or storage. Examine your eggs before putting them into the incubator, if you find thin, rought, abnormal shape or cracked shells do not incubate those eggs.

Odd looking shape eggs should not be set in the incubator. If you want your flock to be of quality breed, always set eggs that are not too small or too large.

Weakness of the shell is just part of poor hatch. Here are a few more tips to look for

Fertility of Egg
Eggs to old when set - set only fresh eggs 7-10 days old
Do not incubate dirty eggs
Eggs not turned often enough - Did you know a hen turns her eggs an average of 96 times in 24 hours
Temperture too high or too low

No humidity or not enough
Improper ventilation
Not following the incubator instructions
Hope this information will help you with your hatching of healthy birds.

 
 

What You Need to Hatch Chickens

Raising backyard chickens has become a popular hobby and many people are interested in trying their hand at hatching chickens. Here is some information on what you need to know about the process. One of the first things to do is get in touch with your county extension agent. The county extension is an excellent source of information on hatching chickens. They can offer guidance on equipment, fertilized chicken eggs, and methods, and answer the many questions that are likely to come up.

You will need to get a reliable chicken egg incubator. The incubator is an enclosure with a water pan that maintains the right conditions of temperature, ventilation and humidity. Proper placement and operation of the incubator is one of the keys to success with hatching.

Obtaining quality eggs is another important part of the process. You won’t be able to hatch supermarket eggs because they are not fertile. In order to hatch you need to get fertile eggs from a hatchery or a local poultry farm. There are poultry equipment suppliers who will send fertile eggs free with the purchase of an incubator.

Hatching eggs should be incubated as soon as possible. The ideal time frame would be within a week. Talk to your supplier to see if you can arrange to have the eggs delivered so that you can incubate right away, that is, within a day or two. If you do have to store them, keep them in cases with the large end up in a climate controlled environment, ideally between 50 60 degrees F. and 75 percent humidity.

Modern incubators have electronically controlled temperature settings, but it’s still a good idea to place the incubator where it won’t be subject to temperature fluctuations due to direct sunlight or window drafts. The power cord should be placed so that it won’t be accidentally pulled from the wall.

Make sure your incubator is in good working order. Read the manual thoroughly so that you understand all the controls, displays and features.

The temperature range should be between 99 and 102 degrees. Though you don’t want the temperature to drop too low, overheating the eggs is more harmful than under heating. Expect to see a drop in temperature when you first put the eggs in. Hatchability will be greatly reduced if the temperature remains outside the range of 97 to 103 degrees for an extended time such as several days. If your incubator has a factory pre-set to a recommended temperature, you will not need to worry about making adjustments.

Maintaining the correct moisture level in the incubator is also important. Humidity should be 50 to 55 percent. For the last three days of incubation, it should be raised to 65 percent. Eggs should be turned several times a day. Many incubators have an automatic feature to take care of this for you.

The guideline for how long the incubation period for chicken eggs is 21 days. The last three days are a critical time. The humidity level needs to be increased. Turning should stop. Most of the chicks will probably hatch within a one-day period. Have a plan for what you will do with the chicks at first, whether you are going to leave them in the incubator or remove them to another enclosure.

 

 
 

Raising Chickens in a City Environment

Before attempting to raise chickens in a city please check your city ordinances first to find out important laws that you may not know! Some cities may not allow chickens. Also, although your city may allow chickens, some neighborhoods may have strict rules concerning properties, so make sure to check everything out first before proceeding.

When raising chickens in a city make sure you can provide plenty of area for chickens to roam free when necessary. You’ll want to be sure that you have the proper materials to keep the area clean, and healthy. Lastly, make sure your chickens get plenty of fresh water, and food.

The first step to raising chickens when living in the city is to find the ideal place to house them.  Many online stores offer chicken houses that are affordable as well as a convenient size. Be sure to choose a place that is not only convenient, but is also safe and in a covered area. You’ll want to be sure to secure your chicken coop as best as possible to avoid natural predators.

Now, choose the perfect coop. This can be something as fun as a family project, to something as simple as just purchasing the coop. You’ll want to decide the size of the coop first to make sure your chickens will be comfortable. The more chickens you plan to have, the larger the coop, but also keep in mind the size of the area you have available for your chickens. If you plan to allow your chickens to free range, be sure to devote enough space for them to do so. Also, when free ranging make sure you have some form of fenced in area to make sure your chickens do not wander, and are safe.

Once you have your coop, now is the time to decide whether or not you want to buy adult chickens, or baby chicks. As chicks these can be an ideal for a family with children as it offers your child a fun project of learning and responsibility. Many site also offer fertilized eggs that you can hatch and raise from birth. If you’d prefer not to raise baby chicks, there are also many ways to adopt an adult chicken for your own. Make sure when choosing your chicken you decide just what type you’d like as there are multiple types of chickens available from large to small. Be sure to get the proper information on feeding and care taking. If you plan on feeding your chickens special feed be sure to do your research first. Do your research before making your final purchase; you’ll want to be as informed as possible.

As your chickens grow they’ll not only offer you eggs, they’ll also offer you companionship. Many do not know that chickens have their own unique personalities and, even in a city setting, with proper care taking these creatures can flourish to great pets, and a great learning experience for young children to care for their own hen.

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FREE FERTILE EGGS with Incubator Purchase - Great Science Fair Project

For a limited time we are offering FREE fertile chicken eggs with the purchase of our mini chicken, quail or duck incubator.  This incubator is inexpensive and perfect for the home or classroom.  We also carry the candling lite, 4H poultry helper guide, brooder box with waterer, feeder and heating lamp.  Visit our site at www.chickenhousesplus.com.

 We carry Hova Bator and Brinsea Chicken Egg or Reptile Incubators

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Want Fresh Eggs But Don't Have the Hens? Well you are in Luck!

For Sale Brown Egg Layers - Day Old Rhode Island Red Hens - Buy now and have eggs by the Spring.  Pick up at our Archer Florida Location - Questions call 352-450-6234
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