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What is the Ameraucana Chicken About?

The Ameraucana chicken, which is also spelled out as the Americana
chicken in some cases, is one of the more interesting chickens to grow. It has one of the more attractive designs of any chicken to take a look at.

The Ameraucana chicken was originated out of Chile. It is not clear as to how early the chickens were found but they are believed to be from the early part of the twentieth century. They were first explained to the civilized world in that period of time. The Mapuche Indians of Chile had been raising them for a while. The Ameraucana chicken was eventually harvested and brought into many other parts of the world, particularly the United Kingdom.

The American Poultry Association officially recognizes this breed of chicken in the Miscellaneous class. This is primarily due to its color considerations.

The comb on the chicken is a pea comb. This features a series of ridges that go from the beak to the top of the chicken's head. The middle ridge is higher up than the rest.

The tail will be positioned at a unique angle. It is about forty-five degrees over a horizontal pattern.

The wattles are not very visible. The chickens do have wattles in most cases but they will not be easy to notice.

The earlobes on the Ameraucana chicken are red. They have a pale appearance on the females in this breed.

The color of the chicken can vary. It can be brown, black or blue in most cases. The males tend to have more of an orange tint to them. A silver appearance may be found on a few of these chickens as well. The designs will vary by each chicken.

The feet are white on the bottom. The shanks are also blue and gray in color. The eyes have a red-brown tone to them.

The size of the Ameraucana chicken is relatively small when compared to other chickens. A rooster can be six to seven pounds in weight. A hen will be around five to six pounds.

This breed is a dual purpose breed that is used for eggs and meat alike. It is best suited for egg production though. It can handle about 250 eggs in the course of a single year.

The eggs are especially unique. The chicken will produce eggs that are often blue or green in color.

The meat that is produced off of the chicken will be very scrumptious. It is often compared in quail meat in terms of its flavor.

Finally, the chicken can be calm and quiet and works well in confined spaces. There are some cases where a chicken might become hostile to people who try to handle it. It may also become tough on other chickens. Some males may even try to rape other hens. It is often best to keep this chicken in confinement. It will at least be calm in this environment.

You can find fertile Ameraucana eggs at ChickenHousesPlus.com. We offer chicken eggs, bantam eggs, duck and guinea eggs and even incubators for all kinds of eggs. We offer everything you need in one stop.v
 
 

Chickens That Lay Colored Eggs

ChickenHousesPlus.com supplies schools, Universities and Homeschoolers with fertile chicken eggs, fertile duck eggs and incubators.  We are a one stop shop for all of your chicken needs.  [Read More]
 
 

Rhode Island Red Chickens

Rhode Island Reds are one of the most popular breeds of chicken, and for good reason! These hardy, easy keepers do well in almost any climate, are great layers of brown eggs, and come in both standard size and a much smaller bantam size. Developed in the states of Rhode Island and Massachusetts in the 1840's, early flocks contained chickens of various colors and comb types, but the most common color today is a lovely deep red that has become the most identifiable characteristic of this iconic breed. Curious and athletic, and able to handle poor diets and even poorer weather, they're a great choice for small flocks. Although usually gentle, quiet, and sociable both towards humans and other chickens, Rhode Island Red chickens can be feisty and independent, and their seemingly endless curiosity can get them into trouble. They can be kept in close quarters, but often become restless and pushy in really tight confinement. These traits, however, also make them great foragers a quality which makes them popular among backyard flocks.

 

Hens begin laying early, and though they will not always lay in the extreme heat or cold, they can lay more than 200 large medium sized brown eggs a year.  It isn't too unusual for them to lay large eggs in their first year, and they may go on to lay double yolked eggs in subsequent years. Because of their egg laying abilities, Rhode Island Red chickens are often used in some of the most common commercial hybrids such as red sex links, ISA browns, and golden sex links. As you may guess from some of the names, the color of day old chicks from some of these hybrid crossings depends on their gender, making it easy to sort females from males as soon as they are hatched.

 

Roosters are large and handsome, and are big enough as cockerels that Rhode Island Reds are considered a "dual purpose breed", meaning that while the hens make great layers, extra males and older hens traditionally provided large and meaty carcasses for the Sunday dinner table! Don't be too quick to send young roos to the freezer, though. They can make for very watchful protectors of the flock, will warn of intruders, and can even make great pets.

The hens rarely go broody, making them ideal for flocks where the maximum number of eggs is wanted. But beware: because of their popularity, and because they are so widely available, some flock lines are considered much better layers than others. If you are considering keeping Rhode Island Red chickens, do your research and make sure you get your birds from a reputable source. Also be aware that there are both "production" lines and "show" lines. In show quality lines, chickens are bred to have close to perfect color and conformation, but may not lay quite so many eggs in a given year as their less pretty relatives.

For adaptability, willingness to forage for some of their own food, personality, and egg laying ability, it's really hard to beat Rhode Island Reds. Whether standard size, bantam, show quality or production variety, these chickens will continue to be among the most popular breeds worldwide.

 
 

Day One: Raising Chickens

Have you decided to raise your own chickens? If so, you may be at a complete loss of where to start. Let’s take it from day one, assuming that you’ve already decided to raise your own flock.

Day One: Where to start?

“We can see a thousand miracles around us every day. What is more supernatural than an egg yolk turning into a chicken?” – S. Parkes Cadman

Start first by ensuring you have the proper facility to raise your flock. Sticking a chicken into a cage is NOT proper facility. A crate or cage can be used for temporary purposes but should never be used as a permanent home. Clean the facility, and ensure there is a safe “home”/chicken coop for your grown chickens to retire to.

If you have decided to raise chickens from eggs, make sure you find a reliable source. Investing in an incubator is an idea if you plan on raising chickens in the long run. Otherwise, some places allow you to rent on.

“The key to everything is patience. You get the chicken by hatching the egg, not by smashing it.” – unknown

Lastly, take your time. Rushing things or skimping on details will result in stale eggs, or chickens that won’t last long.

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Hatching Chickens As A Hobby

Are you thinking about raising chickens in the backyard as a hobby? More and more people are interested in doing this. If you are wondering how to begin, there are a number of things you should know in order to get off to a good start to make sure it’s a successful experience for both you and the chickens.  [Read More]
 
 

Raising Chicken for Food

If you’ve decided to raise your own chickens for food, here are a few tips to follow.

Avoid steroids and other chemicals for your flock. Although these materials may make your chickens larger, it is unhealthy for you. Any unnecessary chemicals can also cause damage to your birds as well.

If you are gathering eggs, be sure to handle with care. Any eggs that are fertilized do not wash as this could damage the baby chick. Check local and state standards for any eggs that you plan to sell. There are many rules and regulations regarding the proper handling and care for food being sold on the market.

Additionally, any meat you plan on selling, be sure to check the regulations as well. If you are planning on selling organically, these rules and regulations are a lot stricter than others. Follow any and all rules from the very beginning, and you’re sure to have a quick turnover and sale.

For purchasing eggs, or chickens, check out www.chickenhousesplus.com.

 
 

Storing Your Fertile Chicken Eggs

Here are a few tips for storing Fertile Chicken Eggs.

Any cracked or overly dirty eggs should be removed and not stored as these impurities reduce the chance of a healthy chicken hatching. These eggs also increase the chance of spreading infection to other eggs that may be in the incubator. Do not try to wash any dirty eggs as this can do more damage than good.

Any fertilized egg should be gathered immediately, and placed in proper storage. Ideally fertilized eggs should make their way into an incubator as soon as possible to reduce the risk of spoiling eggs. Be sure to start your incubator 24 hours before placing fertilized eggs inside to ensure the proper temperatures.

Once a chicken egg is fertile it is very important to keep the egg at the right temperature. If the temperature is too cold then the chick may die.  Some recommend keeping fertilized chicken eggs in a cool dry place, other suggest keeping the fertilized chicken eggs wrapped in a towel to maintain warmth. It is very important to not change the temperatures too fast or drastically as this will reduce the chances of the eggs properly hatching.

 
 

City Living for a Chicken

 

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Fertile Chicken Eggs Black Copper Maran

Black Copper Maran Fertile Chicken Eggs are not only gorgeous but they are considered an exceptional eating egg and highly prized by chefs the world over.  Maran Chickens are a gentle breed generally quiet and docile.  They are also considered to be a “dual” bird in that they supply both eggs and meat.

 Black Copper Maran Fertile Chicken Eggs are a beautiful dark chocolate brown and medium size.  Place your order now for fertile chicken eggs from ChickenHousesPlus.com and you can enjoy these eggs in a few short months and start your own Black Cooper Maran chicken flock.

 
 

Amish Built Chicken Coops Now Available From ChickenHousesPlus.com

Amish Chicken Coops

Amish crafted chicken coops start as low as $375 and may be shipped directly to your home.  Adorable chicken house designs include the “Little Red Hen House”, 4 x 4 Chicken Coop that may be customized to match your house or barn and is perfect for any backyard, a Barn inspired chicken coop for larger flocks and so much more.  Pricing includes delivery to your house.

  [Read More]
 
 

When are Chickens Ready to Retire?

Raising hens for the purpose of having fertilized chicken eggs or fresh eggs daily is a good way of always having safe food. You have taken good care of your egg-laying hens since they began performing at six months old. Now, at five years old, your hen has stopped producing eggs. Five years is a long time to spend with an animal and you may have grown fond of her. If you have fond feelings for your hen or think that the chickens would be depressed if she disappeared, it is okay to keep her as a pet.
 
 

Facts about Fertilized Chicken Eggs

Humans have been eating eggs from birds since prehistoric times. Plenty of birds and animals lay eggs, and people consume them as well, but chicken eggs are without a doubt the most common and most popular. Statistics have shown that six billion eggs are consumed annually-and that’s just in the United States!

Since eggs are such a well-loved kind of food, it is no wonder people express some concern about the kind of egg they are eating. One of these concerns is whether the eggs they got from the supermarket are fertilized chicken eggs or not. But wait, aren’t all eggs supposed to be fertilized in the first place? This article aims to clarify just that.

 
Chick Brooder

It is a known fact that hens lay eggs. However, what is not very well known is that hens can lay eggs with or without the presence of a rooster. For the eggs to be fertilized, the hen and rooster must mate first, and this process must occur prior to the formation of the egg. Thus, if the hen has mated and she lays an egg, then that egg is fertilized. If the hen has not mated and she lays an egg, then that egg is unfertilized. Note, however, that the embryo of a fertilized egg does not undergo any change or development once it is placed inside the fridge. It has also been said that a hen lays fertilized eggs for a week if it has mated even once.

You can tell fertilized chicken eggs apart from unfertilized ones by candling eggs. This is a process traditionally used by farmers. In this process, hold the egg up to the candlelight so you can point out the blood spots and embryo. You will notice some eggs may appear opaque. These opaque eggs are the fertilized ones. Nowadays, you can find lights made specifically for candling eggs, but you may use the candlelight if you wish to do so.

If you crack the egg open, you can also see some differences between fertilized and unfertilized eggs. You can see the white circle present in the egg yolk is more defined in fertilized chicken eggs than in their unfertilized counterparts. You can also see small red lines running along the surface of the egg yolk. People commonly mistake the chalazae, a white stringy material found inside the egg, to be the embryo, but this is not so. The chalazae functions as a sort of barrier to prevent eggs from breaking. It is also found in all eggs.

One question floating among avid egg-eaters is if fertilized eggs are safe for consumption. The answer is yes. It is perfectly okay to eat fertilized eggs. Also, as mentioned in the previous paragraphs, once the fertilized egg is stored inside the fridge, the embryo no longer undergoes any change or development. Rest assured that you can eat your fertilized chicken eggs just fine like the unfertilized ones.

As for its nutritional value, the issue whether fertile chicken eggs are healthier than unfertilized eggs remains up to this day a highly debatable one. If you want to get the most of the egg’s nutrients, go for the freshest eggs available. The longer eggs are kept, the more their protein content gets lost. Like they say, fresh is often best.


Do you know How to Sex Chickens with Feathers? Well it's Easy

Sexing baby chickens is not a very glamorous job but a necessary one. Wait until your chickens have lost their fuzz. Scoop up a group of feathers at the neck with an index card and examine the ends of the feathers. Rounded ends represent female and pointed ends are male. You can also pick up your chicken by the nap of the neck and lift off the ground. If the feet hang down, it is probably a male but if the feet are tucked up close to the body, it is a female.

 
 

How To Raise Ducks and Ducklings

Ducks are a unique animal to raise as a pet, but raising such a special pet requires extra attention. Make sure you raise your ducks from ducklings, or better yet from eggs, to ensure they will respond well to human contact. By raising your ducklings from a young age you’ll be forming a special bond to your new young pet. What many do not realize is that raising a duck is not the same as raising chickens. Here are a few good guidelines to follow for raising your healthy, happy ducklings.

First, make sure you have enough space to raise several ducklings. Keep in mind these cute little critters will grow double in size, and sometimes even larger. Ducks are a very social creature and should not be raised alone, therefore its best to keep several. Ducks are not always suitable for being raised in a backyard setting as they need plenty of space to grow, shelter, and water to swim in. If you have a pool you need to make sure that your pool is not chlorinated as this is harmful to ducks.

Make sure you can provide a great safe place for your ducks as they have several natural predators. Locking your pet ducks into a safe shelter for the night is the best way to ensure their safety as several of ducks predators prey in the night.

In addition to shelter, water, and safety you need to be sure you can devote enough time in the beginning to raise your ducklings as they do require lots of attention to start. Whether you are raising them from egg, or from young ducklings, a positive human influence is key in raising ducks that are happy to be around humans and not afraid of their company.

When raising from eggs or ducklings make sure that, if you do not have the mother, you have plenty of proper heat and incubator for eggs. Once hatched, young duckling will still require plenty of heat to keep them warm at night, and also for the comfort. Monitor your young ducklings to ensure that their heat source is not making them too hot, or providing enough heat during the colder months.

Do any and all research before adopting your ducklings. It is best to be well informed before leaping into the raising. You want to be sure you do plenty of research on the proper feeding and what quality of food your ducklings will need, as well as what type of feed your older ducks will need once they reach full age. Additionally, do research for the best type of housing, the best water source, and any little piece you can think of before brining your duckling’s home. The most important part of successfully raising healthy and happy ducklings is to be informed by making sure you know all the proper techniques to raising your young ducklings. But in the end, your ducklings will make fantastic pets

Did you know Chicken Eggs with Thick Strong Shells Hatch Better


Did you know Chicken Eggs with thick strong shells hatch better

Fertile chicken eggs with thick and strong shells are known to have a better chance of hatching than the chicken eggs with weak thin shells. How do you know if you have a thick shell? Well you can measure the thickness by floating eggs in a salt solution of various concentrations. Specific gravity of an egg is highly correlated wtih the thickness of the shell.

If you have an egg which looks like it has a lot of pores or clear mottled spots on the eggs those egg are weak. The porosity of the shell determines the rate of moisture loss during incubation or storage. Examine your eggs before putting them into the incubator, if you find thin, rought, abnormal shape or cracked shells do not incubate those eggs.

Odd looking shape eggs should not be set in the incubator. If you want your flock to be of quality breed, always set eggs that are not too small or too large.

Weakness of the shell is just part of poor hatch. Here are a few more tips to look for

Fertility of Egg
Eggs to old when set - set only fresh eggs 7-10 days old
Do not incubate dirty eggs
Eggs not turned often enough - Did you know a hen turns her eggs an average of 96 times in 24 hours
Temperture too high or too low

No humidity or not enough
Improper ventilation
Not following the incubator instructions
Hope this information will help you with your hatching of healthy birds.

 
 
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