Fertile Chicken Eggs | Chicken Egg Incubators

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How to Raise Chickens – Tips on Raising Chickens

Raising a coop full of chickens can be a fun and educating experience. Chickens can be hatched or bought from local farmers. They can also be ordered through a number of different hatcheries. If you are learning how to raise chickens then it is best to buy already hatched chicks. It is also recommend to only try raising female chickens, hens, the first time you raise chickens. Roosters can be aggressive, territorial and very loud.

Housing - Find the right Chicken Coop

Before bringing the young chicks home a brooder should be set up for them to spend four to five weeks in. A brooder can be made of almost any type of cage or tub. The brooder should be large enough for the chicks to be able to spread out comfortably. Wood shaving should be used to line the floor of the brooder. The bedding should be changed daily to avoid smell and illness.

Once the chicks are old enough to go outside they will need a chicken coop. The coop should be large enough to shelter the chickens from wind and rain. The chickens will also need enough room for them to scratch at the ground and search for bugs. Most hens will begin to lay eggs around six months. Having a chicken coop will make it a lot easier to find those eggs before they spoil.

Food and Water

The chicks will eat food called crumbles at this time. This type of chick food can be bought in either medicated or non-medicated form. Feeding medicated food will help avoid an illness killing off most of the chickens later on. When you feed non-medicated food then you will have to be especially careful about keeping the brooder and the chicken coop clean. Once the chicks reach a few weeks then you can fed them worms or bugs found in the yard or garden. Avoid feeding them green bugs. This could cause loose droppings and may get the chick sick. Full grown chickens can be feed a well balanced chicken feed. They will also scratch in the dirt looking for worms and bugs.

 

Chicks drink a lot of water, and will need to have clean water available to them at all times. Automated water containers are very helpful. These will help keep the water clean, and can be easily removed to be cleaned.

Temperature

You will also need a heating lamp to help maintain the temperature. The behavior of the chicks can help determine the settings used on the heating lamp. If the chicks huddle close together constantly then they are chilly, and the lamp should be moved closer. If they act sluggish, and avoid contact with each other then they may be too warm. As the chicks' feathers grow then the lamp can be raised higher and higher.

The chickens can be placed outside once their adult feathers have come in. Temperatures should not fall below 50 degrees Fahrenheit at night. Otherwise the young chickens may freeze.

Outside Time

When learning how to raise chickens it is important to have fun, and that means for the chicks also. Chickens are very curious creatures, and love to wonder around. Play time outside is a great way to get the chickens use to living outside later on also. Be very careful to keep an eye on the chicks while they are outside. They can get stuck easily, and are very venerable to larger prey animals, like dogs and cats.

 
 

Do you know How to Sex Chickens with Feathers? Well it's Easy

Sexing baby chickens is not a very glamorous job but a necessary one. Wait until your chickens have lost their fuzz. Scoop up a group of feathers at the neck with an index card and examine the ends of the feathers. Rounded ends represent female and pointed ends are male. You can also pick up your chicken by the nap of the neck and lift off the ground. If the feet hang down, it is probably a male but if the feet are tucked up close to the body, it is a female.

 
 

How To Raise Ducks and Ducklings

Ducks are a unique animal to raise as a pet, but raising such a special pet requires extra attention. Make sure you raise your ducks from ducklings, or better yet from eggs, to ensure they will respond well to human contact. By raising your ducklings from a young age you’ll be forming a special bond to your new young pet. What many do not realize is that raising a duck is not the same as raising chickens. Here are a few good guidelines to follow for raising your healthy, happy ducklings.

First, make sure you have enough space to raise several ducklings. Keep in mind these cute little critters will grow double in size, and sometimes even larger. Ducks are a very social creature and should not be raised alone, therefore its best to keep several. Ducks are not always suitable for being raised in a backyard setting as they need plenty of space to grow, shelter, and water to swim in. If you have a pool you need to make sure that your pool is not chlorinated as this is harmful to ducks.

Make sure you can provide a great safe place for your ducks as they have several natural predators. Locking your pet ducks into a safe shelter for the night is the best way to ensure their safety as several of ducks predators prey in the night.

In addition to shelter, water, and safety you need to be sure you can devote enough time in the beginning to raise your ducklings as they do require lots of attention to start. Whether you are raising them from egg, or from young ducklings, a positive human influence is key in raising ducks that are happy to be around humans and not afraid of their company.

When raising from eggs or ducklings make sure that, if you do not have the mother, you have plenty of proper heat and incubator for eggs. Once hatched, young duckling will still require plenty of heat to keep them warm at night, and also for the comfort. Monitor your young ducklings to ensure that their heat source is not making them too hot, or providing enough heat during the colder months.

Do any and all research before adopting your ducklings. It is best to be well informed before leaping into the raising. You want to be sure you do plenty of research on the proper feeding and what quality of food your ducklings will need, as well as what type of feed your older ducks will need once they reach full age. Additionally, do research for the best type of housing, the best water source, and any little piece you can think of before brining your duckling’s home. The most important part of successfully raising healthy and happy ducklings is to be informed by making sure you know all the proper techniques to raising your young ducklings. But in the end, your ducklings will make fantastic pets

 
 

How long does it take a chicken egg to hatch?

How long does it take a chicken egg to hatch?

If you're new to keeping chickens, or if you're thinking about starting a flock, then you'll no doubt want to find out everything you can about these amazing creatures. Not only will a flock of chickens supply you with gorgeously fresh eggs, but you will also have the opportunity to taste what real chicken tastes like, depending of course on your reasons for keeping chickens in the first place. A common misconception between people is that you need a rooster in order to get eggs, but of course this is simply not true. You only need a rooster if you want fertilized chicken eggs. 

Can you tell if an egg is fertile? 

Yes, but only if you break it open. People who are in the habit of hatching fertilized chicken eggs will usually pick one or two eggs at random and then break them open carefully so that they can inspect the yolks. With an infertile egg, you'll notice a small white/grey dot somewhere on the yolk, but with a fertile egg, there will be a darkish circle around the dot, which to a great extent resembles a bull's eye. By checking a few eggs, you can get a reasonably good idea as to whether or not most of your chicken eggs are fertile.  

Candling fertile chicken eggs during incubation

Once fertilized chicken eggs have been under a brooding hen or in an incubator for a period of about three or four days, you can candle the eggs to see if they've started developing. To do this, you can use the cardboard role that you find in the center of toilet tissue. Simply place the egg on one end and then shine a powerful light in through the other end. Of course this needs to be done in a dark room or in a closet in order for you to see anything. If the eggs are in fact developing, you should at this point begin to see veining, and if you candle the eggs later on in their development you'll even be able to see the baby chicken forming inside the egg. If by day seven you don't see any signs of development, you should consider throwing the eggs out, particularly if you're using an incubator. Eggs that don't develop can explode if you leave them in the incubator, and not only do they make a terrible mess, but the smell is unbearable as well.   

Most people who keep chickens want a rooster so that they can get fertilized chicken eggs to hatch, and you can be rest assured that once you've had your first batch of eggs hatch, you'll to be thoroughly hooked. So, how long does it take for fertilized chicken eggs to hatch? The answer to that is 21 days exactly, although you need to bear in mind that this can vary, depending on a number of circumstances. Generally speaking however, fertile chicken eggs which are hatched out by a hen will take 21 days before you see little faces staring at you from underneath their mamma's wings.

If on the other hand you use an incubator in order to hatch fertilized chicken eggs, they can sometimes hatch a day or two early, or they can also hatch out a few days late. Things like humidity and temperature play a significant role. For example, if the temperature is even a little bit higher than what it should be, you will sometimes have eggs starting to hatch on day nineteen or on day twenty. If for some reason the temperature has dropped below the correct temperature on a few occasions, you could find some of your eggs only hatching on day 22, 23, or even on day 24 or 25. 

 Whereas fertilized chicken eggs usually take exactly 21 days to hatch, most duck eggs take 28 days, apart from Muscovy ducks. As a general rule of thumb, the eggs of Muscovy ducks take 35 days, but once again, it can vary slightly depending on conditions.

 Hatching out fertilized chicken eggs can be extremely rewarding, and the biggest problem flock owners tend to have is that they end up with far more chickens than they had originally planned to have. 

 

 
 
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