Miolea Organic Farm

  (Adamstown, Maryland)
Organic Farming from a City Boy's Perspective
[ Member listing ]

Things happen

I guess I jinxed myself.  I do tempt fate, as it were, but I think that is standard operating procedure for anyone who tries to make a living growing food.  We got into a new market that is willing to take our eggs. 

Just in time, coincidentally, for the layers to slow down production in keeping with the loss of day light hours.  We thought we could deliver about ten dozen a week.  They originally asked for one hundred and twenty, so I had to temper expectations on one hand, while at the same time, plan for expansion in the other. 

Then the layers dropped down to about five eggs a day, about the same time we started losing birds to a hawk.  Coadee was outside but we still lost them.  We started putting her on a lead by her house.  But that was not happening all the time and I got lazy about making her stay around the chickens.  The other problem was we lost Floppy.  She was the oldest layer and was the one that would warn the others when danger was in the air.

I got to the point, with Coadee, were I would put bailing twine under her collar and attach the other end to a pole outside of her house.  All she has to do is walk away and the rope would come out from under her collar.  The thought was she would stay until an intrusion.  Which she actually does, except, this practice was not a daily ritual.  So when a hawk landed on a barren tree outside of the chicken pen, Coadee was not around to distract and run it off and Floppy was not there to screach.

Today, I just happen to go outside, Coadee comes around the house and we head to the pen.  I wanted to close the door of the chicken house to keep heat in the house.  I climbed over the electric fence and saw a grey hawk on top of what I presumed to be a dead layer.  I immediately started throwing things at the bird.  None of which seem to phase it.  I throw a rod, chicken wire, wood blocks (2) and an orange peg.  The only thing that scared it off was a large block of wood used as a chock for the wheel on the chicken trailer. 

It flew into the trees near its catch.  I went to the house to retrieve my gun.  The dog for some reason was aware but was not barking or trying to distract the bird.  I do not think she knew really what was going on, or I was too distracted with the task at hand but she was not the dog I had seen before.

I returned with the rifle saw the bird in the tree and aimed at the bottom of the tree.  I fired, it flew to another tree, I fired it flew further away; I just kept that up until it was gone.  Hawks are a federally protected species as well as it being illegal in the state of Maryland to kill a hawk so I did the next best thing. 

I then turned my attention to the layer.  I picked her up, took her over to the compost pile and correctly composted her.  With each and every one we thank them and return them to the earth that nourished them so that they can in turn nourish the earth.  It makes me feel humane, in light of my failure to provide a safe humane existence for my charge. You learn when growing food that things happen.           

 Buy Local:  Make sure your farmer is real, there are imposters.

 
 

Prop 37

Well the industrial food complex won this latest round in the fight to have a safe food supply.  The IFC pumped enough money into the California proposition 37 to convince people that labeling GMO foods, as such, was not warranted.

It passed by a slim margin so there is still hope.  The fight will go on, those of us dedicated to safe, sustainable food supply are growing.  More people everyday are learning about the ills of GMO foods.  More research is coming out pointing to the flaws of GMO food.  Studies that report findings of GMO corn in the placenta of pregnant women and in there blood samples.

Unfortunately, for the uneducated American consumer some of them or their family members will end up being a statistic in the whole GMO debate.  There is just too much information out there that suggests we need to re-evaluate the use of GMO food.  Why are we the only industrialized nation in the world that allows GMO's in our food supply?

Could it be the lobbyist that the IFC spends millions on to peddle influence when it comes to food policy?  Or is it the government relying on studies conducted by the IFC that prove GMO's are safe?

Either way it should cause you some concern.  Corporations are not people; they have no heartbeat, no endocrine system, no feelings and no regard for human safety other then what their insurance policies dictate.  Okay, so I am cynical, but I know the bottom line and we as a nation have become so bottom line driven that the human equation is not even taken into account.  Actually, a car company made a car that when it was rear-ended the gas tank exploded.  That car company did a cost benefit analysis and found that it would be cheaper to pay for death and personal damages then to recall all the cars and put a ten-dollar part in the car (Elkhart County, Indiana v. Ford Motor Company).  That was back in the seventies before the real greed and bottom line decision making got worse.

I will ask again, if GMO is not bad for the human body, which predictor species show is not the case, then why doesn't the IFC open up the research findings?  Why have the EU, Mexico and other countries outright ban the use of GMO seeds, let alone food for human consumption?  This battle was lost, but it is just but one bump.  As long as there are concerned foodies fighting for a safe food supply, we will prevail.  Lobbyist or not we will prevail.

By Local:  By organic and you will know it is not GMO.

 

Tags:
 
 
RSS feed for Miolea Organic Farm blog. Right-click, copy link and paste into your newsfeed reader

Calendar


Search


Navigation


Topics


Feeds


BlogRoll