Miolea Organic Farm

  (Adamstown, Maryland)
Organic Farming from a City Boy's Perspective
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Connect the dots

Without knowing at the time, I first learned about the degradation of our food supply before I was a teenager.  Sad really, but I now know what I thought was a bad idea really was.  It was the late sixties, early seventies and we had a High’s ice cream store down the street.  I loved their Butter Brickle ice cream, I do not know what butter brickle is I just know it was decedent. 

One day I went to the store and got my favorite, only this time it tasted different.  It did not have the same taste.  Now, I ate it, but I dismissed what I tasted knowing the next time it would be okay.  However, the next time I got my favorite the taste was off again.  It then occurred to me that something had changed and for the worst, but still not really understanding that what I was witnessing was the demise of all things natural, tasty and actually healthy.  I did not know it at the time but the industrial food complex started to bring chemistry into our food supply because it increased their profits, not the consumer’s health.  When the flavor of your ice cream changes a ten-year-old palette is spot on even though a child’s palette is not that sophisticated.

I stopped buying butter brickle and went back to vanilla.  When their vanilla changed, I stopped buying ice cream.  Through the years, I would try different makers but never got that taste.  I still eat ice cream but we make it ourselves from the cream of an organic Guernsey cow’s milk.  No chemicals, preservatives, hormones, steroids or antibiotics, flavor enhancer’s stabilizers nothing but sweet cream.  While being fun to make it is healthier to eat. 

Say, what you want about the advancement of food science, one thing for sure is that the greedy have used it at the detriment of taste, health and the environment.  I am sure everyone can remember a special food or treat that one day changed taste.  I am not talking about new Coke versus old Coke, but that made from staples, milk, eggs, meat, breads, fruits and vegetables.  Tomatoes, we are the generation that saw the humble, tasty tomato turned into a tasteless cardboard orb.  There is no argument that anyone could make about the benefits of food science without feeling a modicum of shame when talking about the tomato.

The bastardization of our foods is why the "Slow Food", "Local Food", "Sustainable/Organic" food movements have been gaining in followers and spreading around the world.  Slow food started in Italy, organic started in the European community and local food came about in the United States.  Sustainable agriculture is a worldwide initiative, as it should be.  If we do not take care of our environment, our children’s children will be the ones to feel the brunt with future generations in even greater peril.  As you read this there are people out there trying to protect us from GMO’s.  Monsanto on the other hand spent millions to defeat Prop 37 in California.  This is all to close to the great tobacco debate for my comfort.  How many years did big tobacco provide scientific evidence that cigarettes were not bad? 

That is why what small farmers do is vital to the future of the environment and health of all humans.  Have you ever heard of a recall from a local farm or a local butcher?  While the New York Times and Wall Street Journal print stories about how sustainable farming will not work, they conveniently leave out the facts from decades of studies.  From the beginning of our nation to the 1950’s farmers were organic.  Chemicals were not introduced into the farm model until after WWII, when the government had to do something with their stockpile of ammonium nitrate from unused bombs. 

A scientist found it made a good fertilizer but also fed weeds.  You know the rest, as the “green revolution", took foothold.  As chemical use rose so did cancer rates, upper respiratory problems, food borne allergies and most importantly the decline of nutritional values in all of our fruits and vegetables.  USDA has been keeping track of nutrient values for produced fruits and vegetables since the 1950’s and since then the nutrient values have declined. 

That fact shocked me but I guess it did not surprise me.  I learned a long time ago that an organic plant would struggle to get nutrients from the ground and conventional plants do not.  That struggle makes the plant nutritious and tasty, the saying “that which does not kill you serves to make you stronger,” really fits.  America's diet, known as the Western diet, is from highly refined grains and sugars, high fat and little organic or nutrient benefit.  To learn more read Michael Pollan’s “In Defense of Food”.  It is informative and gives vetted reasons why obesity and other Western diseases are prevalent here but not in France, where their diet is high in fat and sugars.  Known as the French paradox in nutritional circles, their diet creates a conundrum for Western food scientist, who can not explain how such an unhealthy diet does not cause the rates of heart attacks, strokes, diabetes and obesity that afflict American eaters.

When you consider Americans use to eat as the French, before the 1950’s, questions about todays dietary diseases naturally occur, especially when you hear the French do not have the numbers of obese people, heart attacks, food allergies and all the other Western anomalies in comparison to our numbers.  Not only has food science played a roll in the degradation of our nutrient sources but of taste.  It has taken forty years but I am finally understanding and able to connect the dots.

Buy Local: Now that you know, what will you do?

 

 

 

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