Miolea Organic Farm

  (Adamstown, Maryland)
Organic Farming from a City Boy's Perspective
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Who adopts whom when a animal shows up

I understand adoption from a human perspective.  The older human elects to take responsibility for a baby or young child -a child, an innocent, open sponge for education, be it emotional, intellectual, spiritual or just plain surroundings and environment - in essence, a long-term commitment to the betterment of this being.

I would never have said that an animal would adopt a human.  Everything living eventually becomes aware of their surroundings; from there, Darwin's theory takes over.  The strong and smart do survive and adaptability is the key to long-term establishment. 

While living in the city I can say at no time did a dog, cat or any other animal come up to the yard and just hang around or choose to live there.  So far, since we moved to the farm, two cats have adopted us and several dogs were "maybe's" (unfortunately, their owners responded to our call).  The first cat, BC, was found living in the barn on the President's Day Blizzard in 2003 and was unable to hunt for food.  We started feeding her and then named it BC,  for our  first "barn cat. " We are not the most sophisticated people when it comes to naming things.   

I had not come across this phenomenon of having animals walk up to you or your house as if they belong.  I never came across this little fact while reading farming books either.  Two years ago, we had a cat come out of the woods and walk up to my wife, sitting on our front porch, talking to her or ME-OWing as he approached.

My wife stopped what she was doing and waited for the cat to come to her.  talking in smooth tones, encouraging the cat with the sound of trust, she put her hand out and the boisterous cat darted toward her, then backed off, but returned to rub against her and meow.

After some time, he would walk over to the shade and lay down.  From that point on he would show up when we were outside working.  His actions were the same, you would hear him talking as he was walking to you.  Once there he would walk and rub against your legs, seemingly demanding to be pet.    Adoption number two took place that July.  Like BC, we took him in to our vet, and got him fixed , and he started to adjust to life in the house.  BC taught him who was tops in the feline hierarchy and he took to his new position with no issues. 

Almost immediately, we started noticing Woody sleeping in peculiar positions.  So one time I took a picture and sent it to my niece (who had fallen in love with our newest cat) and a hobby was born.  It was too easy to pass up, I do not have time for a hobby nor interest, but I have a camera phone and it is with me all the time.  I walk in: Woody is sleeping between the arm of the sofa and the table, so I take a shot.  Then upload the picture with the rest of them.  Follow the link below to see the different pictures.  We hope you enjoy.

 Buy Local:  Support your agriculture.

WOODY SLEEPING Press the play button when you get there.
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Comments:

Ahhh, yes, the farm cats. We've had strays show up, and whole litters of kittens dropped off in the middle of the night. For us, it has worked both ways...we've had to get rid of cats who were eating chicks and rabbits, and have some that stayed. I named the smallest kitten in one litter "Itty Bit"(short for itty bitty kitty). She went from being the farm's greatest mouser (but could enter coops without agitating hens with chicks as she was so trustworthy) to one of the few of our many critters who can come inside. She's a special one and I glad to have her here!

Posted by Emily on February 24, 2011 at 08:53 AM EST #

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