At Home in Nature

  (Agate, Colorado)
TwoInTents Blog
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Invite a Hackberry to tea!

Hackberries are popular landscaping in Colorado, they are very hardy and pretty; they also attract numerous birds for their delicious berries.

It is a Cannabis, just like hops, hemp and marijuana. But unlike hops and marijuana, it is typically not used for recreational purposes.

The berries are used in jellies and wine making, as well as delicious fruits for your favorite cookie recipe. Use like raisins.

Its wood is used not only for superior tools (the wood bends far without breaking), but also for ceremonial fires for many native American tribes.

It’s leaves are used in traditional Korean tea. In Korea, a traditional tea is made from hackberry leaves, maple leaves, yellow catalpa leaves and daimyo oak called Gamro cha. Do try it!

As you collect your next meal, try giving a mind to tea: besides producing an enjoyable and often nutritious or medicinal drink, taking time for tea is a way of embracing the Japanese aesthetic of wabi so essential to the tea ceremony. Without all the fancy equipment of a tea ceremony (which you may not always have at tea time) you can practice wabi through an appreciation of quiet or sober refinement and subdued taste characterized by humility, restraint, simplicity, naturalism, profundity, imperfection, and asymmetry to emphasize the simplicity of unadorned objects and natural or architectural spaces, celebrating the mellow beauty that time and care impart to the material world. Wabi, a concept born of Zen Buddhism, shows us we can nourish body and soul at once.

Description
Region
Northeast
Habitat
Parks, fields, floodplains, fence rows, wastelands
Type
Deciduous Tree
Full Size
33-82 ft
Bark
Warty, light gray
Leaves
Twigs point every direction. Alternate, ovate, serrated, tips acuminate
Flowers
Greenish-yellow
Fruit
Drupe, usually orange-brown, small, round, grow singly on a long pedicel
Similar Plants
Edible
Fall
Berries
Raw (spit out seed). Sweet and dry
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