Wall Flower Studio Garden

  (Algonquin Highlands, Ontario)
Organically Grown ~ From The Garden
[ Member listing ]

Help Protect Our Pollinators - The Bees Need Us. We Need Them, too!

~ A GLOBAL BEE EMERGENCY ~ Happening NOW ~

 

.............................

 

Quietly, around the world,

 

Billions of Honey Bees and other pollinators are dying.

 

.

 

This is more than alarming.

 

.

 

This is a fact.

 

It threatens our crops and food supply on a global basis, and in my opinion is more of a threat to our livelihood than anything else.

 

.

 

A global ban of one group of pesticides could save bees from extinction.

 

Yes, that's right.

 

It can make all the difference.

 

.

 

Four European countries have begun banning these poisons, which are called:

 

 

neonicotinoid pesticides.

 

.

 

There is evidence that due to the banning, some bee populations are recovering.

 

That's good news!

 

.

 

Here's the bad news...

 

Unfortunately, big chemical companies,

 

like Bayer,

 

(the culprit for this one, and just as insidious a corporation as)

 

Monsanto & Dow AgroSciences,

 

all of whom LOBBY really hard to keep all their killer poison pesticides on the market.

 

.....

 

A global outcry is now on for a ban in the U.S. the E.U. where debate is raging,

 

and hopefully here in Canada, too.

 

.

 

I'm hoping this will provoke an outcry from people like me, gardeners and people of all walks of life who want a total ban on these hazzardous poisons.

 

.

 

This could create a ripple effect around the world. : )

 

 

Let's build a giant global buzz calling for these dangerous chemicals to beoutlawed in the U.S., Canada, and EU until and unless they are proved to be safe, and I do not believe they are.

 

.

 

Please consider signing a petition to save bees and other pollinators, and our crops:

 

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/save_the_bees/

 

The Bees need us. And, we need them just as much, if not more.

 

........................

 

So, you ask...

 

What can we do in our own little way, in our own back yard, to help the Bees?

 

Here are some great tips & links!

 

 

1) Plant a pollinator-friendly garden

 

http://pollinationcanada.ca/?n=pc_lib_pfg*

 

 

2) Don't ever use pesticides or chemical fertilizers. They do more harm than good, and are not needed.

 

(Except to line the pockets of big Ag and Chem's greedy pockets.)

 

http://google.ca/search?q=organic+gardening*

 

 

3) Naturalize the garden. Or a part of it.

 

Plant native flowers in your yard.

 

They are suited to your area and landscape.

 

Native plants are partners with pollinators.

 

http://google.ca/search?q=wildflowers*

 

 

4) Become a backyard beekeeper.

 

I'm going to!! : )

 

http://google.ca/search?q=backyard+beekeeping*

 

 

5) Support conservation, wetland conservation, and biodiversity.

 

Once it's gone, that's all folks.

 

http://planetfriendly.net/dontpave.html#links*

 

 

6) Definitely avoid industrial food and GMOs at all cost.

 

Who need's Monsanto's poisons? Not me! Not you, either.

 

So, shop locally and organically whenever possible.

 

http://planetfriendly.net/organic.html#food*

 

 

7) Be a pollinator observer. I am!! And, it's fun for kids, too!

 

It's like a science experiment in your own back yard!

 

http://pollinationcanada.ca/?n=pc_be_an_observer*

 

 

8 ) Learn more about Bees & Pollinators and why everyone needs to get involved:

 

http://planetfriendly.net/wiki/?title=Save_the_Bees*

 

 

9) Live sustainably. It's all connected. We're all connected.

 

We can't just hop skip and jump to another planet if we destroy this one.

 

We have to take care of it now.

 

Even in small ways. It adds up.

 

------------------------------------------

 

An interesting fact from Pollination Canada

 

"Pollinating insects are "essential for over a billion dollars of apples, pears, cucumbers, melons, berries, and many other kinds of Canadian farm produce".

 

*

 

That's a lot to ask of these creatures.

 

The least we can do in return is to NOT poison them!

 

*

 

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More links about how to help our pollinators:

 

http://www.pollinationcanada.ca/

 

 

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign

 

http://pollinator.org/nappc/

 

 

Pollinator Partnership

 

http://pollinator.org/

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

And Don't forget to post your bee-friendly jobs, internships and volunteeropportunities with GoodWork: http://GoodWorkCanada.ca/

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.--

 

Again, my thanks to People and Planet Canada

 

Gateway to Environment and Sustainability Since 1998

 

Subscribe: http://www.planetfriendly.net/

 

.

 

Thanks for visiting! Happy Organic Gardening!

 

-----------------

Visit:  Wall Flower Studio

Thank you!

Dandelions - Embrace Them - They're Not the Enemy!

Call me crazy, but I like Dandelions.

 That's right. And, I couldn't help but think of them lately. Here's why: .

As I watch the news pertaining to events surrounding the ongoing tragedy happening to our Japanese friends, like many, I watch in horror.

The newscasters keep offering horrible news. Radiation levels in some parts of Japan has affected their food and water supply, milk and vegetables, and it's now spiked to dangerous and deadly levels.

While watching the news on comes a commercial break... I was about to get up and make a coffee, however... one commercial came on that caught my attention.

 It was a commercial for Roundup®. You know that stuff. It's a poisonous chemical herbicide, created by that giant chemical conglomerate, Monsanto. .

You've heard of Monsanto. They were the co-creators of Agent Orange.

 Wasn't that nice of them? . A real tribute to mankind. 

So, back to the Roundup. You know the stuff. It's the chemical you have to actually pay for, so that it can be sprayed in the garden, perhaps on food being grown, Food that you might feed to kids, friends and family members.

So, picture this... A cowering little Dandelion. A big bottle of Roundup®, aimed & ready to open fire on that Dandelion. . Talk about playing up to an old Wild West Mentality! I actually laughed at the absurdity of it all. Absurdity mixed with a heaping helping of disgust. .

This chemical company is telling me that a useful little yellow flower is my enemy!! .

What does Monsanto have against dandelions? What did a dandelion ever do to deserve such a powerful enemy? Why do they want to instil such hatred into my head for this little flower? . Dandelions have never done anything to me. Have they ever done anything to anyone? Not that I know of... .

So, I'll tell you why... It all comes down to corporate profit. . If Monsanto can't promote the dandelion as an enemy to you and me, no more profits for them or their shareholders.

. Well, I don't give a damn about Monsanto or their shareholders.

 There is cause and affect for everything we do. Perhaps people don’t realize that the chemicals sprayed in the garden has to go somewhere. It doesn't just miraculously go away..

It leaches down into the soil. . The earth we live on. . Right into our water supply. .

Hmm, I have a well on my property. I don't want to drink this poison, or have my children drink it either. .

That, my friends, would be asinine. It makes no sense. . Who in their right minds would want to choose to poison their own water hole?

. A 2008 scientific study has shown that Roundup formulations and metabolic products cause the death of human embryonic, placental, and umbilical cells in vitro, even at low concentrations. .

 So, my point is that there’s no need for Monsanto's poisons if Dandelions aren't really our enemy. Hmmm. That sounds pretty good!

 I mean, come on.... Is one plant, growing between the cracks in our patio's so hideous, and such a blight to our sensibilities as human beings, that we're ready to spray deadly and harmful poisons on our own property that in the end will only poison us, and which may subject us and our children to ill effects down the road? It makes no sense...  

. Consider this, a main active ingredient of Roundup is the surfactant POEA (polyethoxylated tallow amine), known for its toxicity in wildlife. It increases herbicide penetration in plant and animal cells.

 . Consider also the fact that several weed species, known as superweeds, have developed resistance to Monsanto's herbicides, largely because of repeated exposure.

. Superweeds?? This sounds like sci-fi thriller. But it's actually happening now. And, it's part of the reason our food costs are higher. . Monsanto now has to create more powerful herbicide chemicals to combat those superweeds they've created.

. Sounds like the lady who swallowed the fly... More absurdity. . Is a dandelion really worth all of this?

. If a weed really bothers a person, I ask them to please consider boiling kettle full of water and pouring that boiling water on the crack that contains that little dandelion.

. That'll do the trick. Really. It's that simple.

. Consider our children, our future, our planet.

. Consider the fact that using chemicals to spray a few weeds is overkill on so many levels.

. Consider the fact that our Japanese friends now have poisons on their food supply, through no choice of their own, and it will likely be there for a hundred years. It will make them sick if they eat it.

 Why would we, as intelligent as we think we are, fork out money and pay for a toxic product to willingly do this to ourselves??

Things to make with Dandelions:

Dandelion Wine

Dandelion Jelly .

Dandelion chains ( Remember doing this as a child?)

Dandelion leaves in salad. They're tasty and nutritious, too!

Dandelion Tea .

Thanks for visiting! Happy Organic Gardening!

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Basil - So versatile!

Basil  - Ocimum basilicum (a.k.a. Sweet Basil, Common Basil, Italian Basil) Probably the most popular herb in North America today. It's GREAT FOR COOKING!

A bit about growing Basil:
Height in inches: 24" - Spread: 12-15"
Germination: 7-10 days - Sowing depth: 1/8"
Planting Season: Sow outside in Spring 1-2 weeks after the last frost
Requirements: Likes full sun for best success. Plant in well-drained soil with plenty of organic matter. 
Out of the more than 150 varieties of Basil available, my personal favorites, Lemon Basil, Ocimum basilicum citrodorium, and the ever popular Italian Large Leaf Basil, aka: Genovese basil, are perfect for pesto and pasta sauces. I use it fresh and it tastes great with almost all dishes.
The Italian Large Leaf Basil has large dark green, shiny leaves that grow up to 3 inches long on a tall, upright plant. Thankfully, Basil has very few pests, and you can also use Basil as a companion plant to repel mites, and tomato worms. Tomatoes loves Basil!    

Basil loves to be pinched out the tips, which will encourage fuller plants, delaying flowers, and it going to seed. I suggest letting one plant go to seed so that you can grow them again in the garden next year, but of course Basil can be grown indoors on a sunny windowsill, so the seeds can be planted anytime!

Happy Gardening!

 
 

Rudbeckia - Black Eyed Susan - Lovely Native Flowers

I love Black-Eyed Susans, (otherwise known as Rudbeckia). This is not just because of their natural beauty, but also because the deer don't eat them in my garden! I've heard that rabbits do like Rudbeckia, but fortunately, I have 2 cats, and that seems to keep those pesky rabbits away. : )

There are about 25 species in the Rudbeckia genus, all native to the plains and prairies of the Midwest. Growing native plants is especially important to provide food for our pollinators, and because native plants grow very happily in their own habitat.

Rudbeckia species are obviously referred to as Black-Eyed Susans because of their dark-brown central disk flowers which are surrounded by bright yellow daisy-like flowers.
Many species freely self-seed if not dead-headed, which will result in many small plants growing en masse throughout the garden. A beautiful look in any garden or meadow!

Black Eyed Susans will reach 2 feet; it's a perennial that blooms from late June right into Autumn and is hardy in Canada to zone 4, and in the U.S.A., it's hardy to zone 3.

Thank you, and Happy Gardening!

 
 

Arikara Sunflower - An Heirloom Rich With Heritage!

The Arikara Sunflower
Pictured above is photo that snapped at the Stanhope Heritage Museum today, where I take maintain the gardens.
I'm so pleased that they grew this well and grateful I didn't forget to go at least once, armed with my camera!
The Arikara is more than just an rare heirloom. It's a sunflower rich in history.
It was originally collected from the Arikara First Nations in North Dakota, and amazingly, it grows in a range of flower head sizes and types due to it's diverse genetic origins.

The flowers here are growing with different shades of yellow, some heads are large single blooms, and some have smaller multiple-heads.
The single head, pictured here spans 1 foot across! Just marvelous!

The stalks can grow to 12 feet; Mine shown here are 7+ feet tall, and the flowers produce very tasty seeds. I can tell you that the bees were all over them!!
Everything I grow in the gardens, both at my studio and the Stanhope Museum is
done using organic methods only.
The Arikara seeds I originally purchased were certified organic.
Have since collected the seeds from these magnificent plants and offer them here on Local Harvest. Please check my farm listing. Thank you!
Happy Gardening : )
Links about the history of Arikara:
 
 
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