Wall Flower Studio Garden

  (Algonquin Highlands, Ontario)
Organically Grown ~ From The Garden
[ Member listing ]

Help Protect Our Pollinators - The Bees Need Us. We Need Them, too!

~ A GLOBAL BEE EMERGENCY ~ Happening NOW ~

 

.............................

 

Quietly, around the world,

 

Billions of Honey Bees and other pollinators are dying.

 

.

 

This is more than alarming.

 

.

 

This is a fact.

 

It threatens our crops and food supply on a global basis, and in my opinion is more of a threat to our livelihood than anything else.

 

.

 

A global ban of one group of pesticides could save bees from extinction.

 

Yes, that's right.

 

It can make all the difference.

 

.

 

Four European countries have begun banning these poisons, which are called:

 

 

neonicotinoid pesticides.

 

.

 

There is evidence that due to the banning, some bee populations are recovering.

 

That's good news!

 

.

 

Here's the bad news...

 

Unfortunately, big chemical companies,

 

like Bayer,

 

(the culprit for this one, and just as insidious a corporation as)

 

Monsanto & Dow AgroSciences,

 

all of whom LOBBY really hard to keep all their killer poison pesticides on the market.

 

.....

 

A global outcry is now on for a ban in the U.S. the E.U. where debate is raging,

 

and hopefully here in Canada, too.

 

.

 

I'm hoping this will provoke an outcry from people like me, gardeners and people of all walks of life who want a total ban on these hazzardous poisons.

 

.

 

This could create a ripple effect around the world. : )

 

 

Let's build a giant global buzz calling for these dangerous chemicals to beoutlawed in the U.S., Canada, and EU until and unless they are proved to be safe, and I do not believe they are.

 

.

 

Please consider signing a petition to save bees and other pollinators, and our crops:

 

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/save_the_bees/

 

The Bees need us. And, we need them just as much, if not more.

 

........................

 

So, you ask...

 

What can we do in our own little way, in our own back yard, to help the Bees?

 

Here are some great tips & links!

 

 

1) Plant a pollinator-friendly garden

 

http://pollinationcanada.ca/?n=pc_lib_pfg*

 

 

2) Don't ever use pesticides or chemical fertilizers. They do more harm than good, and are not needed.

 

(Except to line the pockets of big Ag and Chem's greedy pockets.)

 

http://google.ca/search?q=organic+gardening*

 

 

3) Naturalize the garden. Or a part of it.

 

Plant native flowers in your yard.

 

They are suited to your area and landscape.

 

Native plants are partners with pollinators.

 

http://google.ca/search?q=wildflowers*

 

 

4) Become a backyard beekeeper.

 

I'm going to!! : )

 

http://google.ca/search?q=backyard+beekeeping*

 

 

5) Support conservation, wetland conservation, and biodiversity.

 

Once it's gone, that's all folks.

 

http://planetfriendly.net/dontpave.html#links*

 

 

6) Definitely avoid industrial food and GMOs at all cost.

 

Who need's Monsanto's poisons? Not me! Not you, either.

 

So, shop locally and organically whenever possible.

 

http://planetfriendly.net/organic.html#food*

 

 

7) Be a pollinator observer. I am!! And, it's fun for kids, too!

 

It's like a science experiment in your own back yard!

 

http://pollinationcanada.ca/?n=pc_be_an_observer*

 

 

8 ) Learn more about Bees & Pollinators and why everyone needs to get involved:

 

http://planetfriendly.net/wiki/?title=Save_the_Bees*

 

 

9) Live sustainably. It's all connected. We're all connected.

 

We can't just hop skip and jump to another planet if we destroy this one.

 

We have to take care of it now.

 

Even in small ways. It adds up.

 

------------------------------------------

 

An interesting fact from Pollination Canada

 

"Pollinating insects are "essential for over a billion dollars of apples, pears, cucumbers, melons, berries, and many other kinds of Canadian farm produce".

 

*

 

That's a lot to ask of these creatures.

 

The least we can do in return is to NOT poison them!

 

*

 

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More links about how to help our pollinators:

 

http://www.pollinationcanada.ca/

 

 

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign

 

http://pollinator.org/nappc/

 

 

Pollinator Partnership

 

http://pollinator.org/

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

And Don't forget to post your bee-friendly jobs, internships and volunteeropportunities with GoodWork: http://GoodWorkCanada.ca/

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.--

 

Again, my thanks to People and Planet Canada

 

Gateway to Environment and Sustainability Since 1998

 

Subscribe: http://www.planetfriendly.net/

 

.

 

Thanks for visiting! Happy Organic Gardening!

 

-----------------

Visit:  Wall Flower Studio

Thank you!

 
 

Chelone - Turtlehead - Hot Lips!

This beautiful "Pink Turtlehead", (Chelone lyonii - Hot Lips) blooms from late July right through to October. It's a North American native perennial flower that hosts the Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly.
Chelone comes from the Greek word that means tortoise because each blossom resembles, (without too much imagination required), a turtle's head.
It's a good perennial for late summer colour. It doesn't like excessive heat, but will tolerate full Sun if it has it's requirement of moist soil. Actually, the soggier the soil, the better it will perform in your garden!
The flowers are cross-pollinated primarily by bumblebees, but I've seen the Ruby-Throated Hummingbird visiting my flowers for their nectar. But, here is the best part of all... The bitter foliage is usually avoided by Deer and other herbivores. Hooray!!
I've yet to see a white variety growing, but from what I've read, they too are happiest in damp locations such as ditches beside the road. This lovely pink/purple version grows in my shade garden and is considered a rare and possibly endangered species. I have collected a limited amount of seeds from them, so if you're intersted, email/query me here:
- sloanartgallery(at)gmail(dot)com
Culture/Info:
  • Foliage: Herbaceous smooth-textured.
  • Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings.
  • This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds.
  • Propagation Methods: By dividing the rootball or from seed; direct sow outdoors in fall or early spring.
  • Stratify seeds if sowing indoors.
  • Seed Collecting: Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds.
  • Non-patented native perennial
  • Height: 24-36 in. (60-90 cm)
 
 

Coreopsis lanceolata - Another Useful Native!

Coreopsis lanceolata - Tickseed (Organic & Native)

Available here my Local Harvest Store. - 25 seeds/pkg. 

An exceptionally easy to grow flower that tolerates a wide range of soil conditions! Tickseed is drought tolerant, but can also withstand prolonged periods of moisture.

You can save the seeds from Coreopsis or let the birds have them. It's a real treat for them!
Coreopsis grows well in either a partially shaded or sunny location. The bright yellow flowers bloom on 2 to 3 feet tall stems.

This wonderful native flower blooms from June right through to September, once the plants are established, during the second year. The foliage of this flower makes an attractive ground cover the remainder of the year. It's a perennial.

None of the seeds I sell are genetically engineered. (I am against gmo's and have taken the safe seed pledge.)

Thanks for viewing, and Happy Gardening!

 
 

Gaillardia ~ Blanket Flower - Native & Drought Tolerant!

 
Gaillardia aristata .. Blanket Flower seed packet .. Lovely Perennial Native .. Pollinators love them .. Give a Garden Gift this Holiday ..
A Showy North American Native!

Gaillardia aristata, commonly known as blanket flower, is a native perennial wild flower, which makes this delightful and colorful specimen perfect for sunny locations.

With it's showy flowers, it makes a nice addition to your butterfly garden as well as a great cut flower. All pollinators seem to love them, so if you're concious about attracting good insects to your garden, this is the one for you!
 
Gaillardia aristata prefers full sun but will tolerate some partial shade.
The daisy-like flowers bloom summer to fall in shades of red and yellow.

Blanket Flower is a native wildflower of our North American plains and prairies. It's often used as a cut flower in arrangements!

Another bonus, you ask? Neither deer nor rabbit have ever touched my Gaillardia! That fact alone sold me!

Available --> here at Wall Flower Studio's Local Harvest store!

Happy Gardening!

Karen - Wall Flower Studio ~ http://wallflowerstudioseeds.blogspot.com

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Seedy Saturday - 2010 - On a Sunday!

Wall Flower Studio is pleased to announce we will once again be participating at Seedy Saturday (on a Sunday for 2010!), in Toronto.

People will be able to purchase organically grown products directly from me.
WIth more than 100 varieties of vegetables, herbs and heirloom flowers, plus my
plantable paper, seed balls and organically grown lavender,
I'm really looking so forward to meeting other like minded gardeners, and flower/veggie/plant enthusiasts!
Please click the links at the bottom for more information regarding the date, time and location.
At Seedy Saturday (on a Sunday, this year), you'll find organic and heirloom veggies & flower and herb seeds, as well as witnessing the amazing demo's and talks regarding gardening & growing food, which will help educate people about the need to save our own seeds and grow our own food.
This year the feature is on native gardening. Something we should all be doing, especially with regards to our declining pollinators.
Our planet has to have diversity to offer all the kinds of life that it supporst, and we need to promote ways that will be sustainable for years to come. This, and more, is all happening at Seedy Saturday (don't forget it's actually on a Sunday!!)

I just want to offer kudo's to all the people involved in this event. The ones who make it happen! Being an organic gardener and seed seller, as well an ecologically thinking person, I'm really looking forward to being a part of this year's Seedy Saturday (on a Sunday!).
It's all happening on Sunday, February 21st, 2010 - 12:30 to 6:00 pm
All this is thanks to: ~ Toronto Community Garden Network, ~The Stop, and
Hope to see you there!
 
 

Rudbeckia - Black Eyed Susan - Lovely Native Flowers

I love Black-Eyed Susans, (otherwise known as Rudbeckia). This is not just because of their natural beauty, but also because the deer don't eat them in my garden! I've heard that rabbits do like Rudbeckia, but fortunately, I have 2 cats, and that seems to keep those pesky rabbits away. : )

There are about 25 species in the Rudbeckia genus, all native to the plains and prairies of the Midwest. Growing native plants is especially important to provide food for our pollinators, and because native plants grow very happily in their own habitat.

Rudbeckia species are obviously referred to as Black-Eyed Susans because of their dark-brown central disk flowers which are surrounded by bright yellow daisy-like flowers.
Many species freely self-seed if not dead-headed, which will result in many small plants growing en masse throughout the garden. A beautiful look in any garden or meadow!

Black Eyed Susans will reach 2 feet; it's a perennial that blooms from late June right into Autumn and is hardy in Canada to zone 4, and in the U.S.A., it's hardy to zone 3.

Thank you, and Happy Gardening!

 
 

Have a Green Eco-Friendly Event!

A Green Idea!
These days, thankfully, many people are opting to plan green events.
We are all seeking ways to celebrate and give gifts that are not going to be added to landfil. Making environmentally friendly decisions throughout the planning process can be easy!
  
Here is my green idea: And not only as wedding favours, but gift tags, name/place cards, business cards, or even bookmarks! Plantable Paper!
This can help ease the burden and lessen your carbon footprint on our planet.
Whether you are committed to a completely green wedding/party/shower, or wish to do what you can in safeguarding our planet, these "green" plantable paper shapes will get you on your way.
Many colours available.
Pink, Green, Petalled, Purple, Blue and Yellow.
Butterflies shown. (Approx. 5" wide )
Native, and open-pollinated, organically grown seeds, embedded in 100% recycled post consumer, handmade paper.
They can be used as business cards, gift tags, or name tags for dinner parties!
So many wonderful uses. ~ Please feel free to inquire.
Seed List
-Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
-Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja spp.)
-Blazing Star (Liatris pycnostachya)
-Prairie Coneflower (Ratibida columnifera)
-Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)
-Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata)
-Red Columbine (Aquilegia formosa)
-Blanket Flower (Gaillardia aristata)
-Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)
-Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa)
-Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)
-Shooting Star (Dodecatheon hendersonii)
-Chocolate Lily (Fritillaria lanceolata)
-Shrubby Penstemon (Penstemon fruticosus)
-Common Camas (Camassia quamash)
-Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium)
-Turk’s-cap Lily (Lilium michiganense)
-Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus)
-Larkspur (Delphinium nuttallianum)
-New England Aster (Aster novae-angliae)
-Fawn Lily (Erythronium oregonum)
-Wild Bergamot (Monarda fistulosa)
-Ox-eye daisy (Heliopsis helianthoides)
Thank you & Happy Gardening!
 
 

Garden And "Growing" Trends for 2010

Home & Community Edible Gardens:

Due to the previous downturn in the economy it's my belief that more and more people will see the benefits of growing their own food, or art at least growing some food to offset purchases from the grocery store. This also includes community gardening, which is a huge asset and benefit to any city, not just for the food that is grown, but for the social aspect of gardening as well.
And, with the growing concern of chemicals used by food manufacturers, there is resurgence or renaissance with edible gardens. Just look at the Whitehouse garden, and the impact that has had on many to follow in it's footsteps!
Gasoline prices continue to be a factor in higher food costs, so a greater reliance on domestic and local growers of food will become the norm. It's already happening, and the timing couldn't be better, really!
Gardening, for some time has been considered more of a hobby, but will become more important as people develop into a more cautious attitude about what food they eat and where it comes from.


Kitchen Herb Gardens:

Herb gardens can be created indoors on windowsills and of course, outdoors. Some may be small in size, ie. container herb gardens, but these flavourful and useful plots will continue to become popular as people learn how vast the choices are for herbs in which to grow and use in their food.
Heirlooms herbs and veggie's will also become more common as people start to realize that food products grown with gmo's are doing more harm than good for both our health and well being, and to the environment. Also, many are beginning to realize that so many of our older varieties of vegetables are being lost, due most in part to corporations only growing a few varieties of food, which means lack of diversity for the human race to feed upon. That's why the potato famine happened. We don't want that to ever occur again! Relying on only a few varieties of produce will surely lead to that.

Garden Rooms:

Rooms out of doors will continue to "grow" in popularity as people are spending more time entertaining friends and family at home. Partly due to the economy, but also because it is a popular trend enhancing our homes as a sanctuary for our own well being.
Enlarging gardens, replacing travel with new patios, barbecue areas, water features, as well as other landscaping options, has already becoming popular for a many.
Outdoor areas can be utilized to the enth degree as individuals continue to create their own version of paradise with the use of exciting new varieties of plant material, planters, and weatherproof decor and other architectural features.

Native, Organic & Heirloom Gardening:

One of the most positive gardening trends is the commitment of gardeners towards organic practices in their garden.
There is an increased awareness and interest to view the natural landscapes of woodlands, meadows, and wetlands for inspiration in their gardens.
There are many ecological and environmental reasons to use native plants in the garden. It makes for an increase in biodiversity, provides habitat for creatures such as butterflies, birds and other pollinators, and can become a refuge for the many native plants that are increasingly becoming rare in their natural habitats.
Using native plants helps to conserve water and eliminates the need for pesticides, fertilizers and other chemicals that we are realizing are unhealthy practices on our planet.
The benefits of native plant gardening include less work and a beautiful garden.
Native plants evolved here and adapted to the environment in which they grow. That means the weather patterns and the other flora and fauna that have evolved with them are equally comfortable together. These variations of adaptability to the regional environment are what make native plants so effortless to raise.

Happy Gardening!

 
 

Three Sisters Garden ~ Historical Companion Planting

This year at the Stanhope Discovery Museum, where I'm the garden's coordinator, we once again, planted a "Three Sisters Garden".

Until I moved from Toronto, here to Haliburton County, I'd yet to hear about what a Three Sisters Garden actually was. It's an immensly interesting, yet simple way to participate in companion planting in your own garden, so I'm happy to share what I've learned.

Many people think of companion planting as a relativley new idea, but it's definatley not! This is a First Nation concept which goes back millenia. It's truly heirloom gardening in it's finest form; A beneficial co-existance and a sustainable practice, passed down from generation to generation, just as the seeds were. It's success was passed on as well, to other tribes and regions in North America.

Here's how it works...

The Three Sisters is a combination of three plants:
-corn (maize)
-beans (pole)
-squash
Each supports the growth of the other in one way or another. Corn supports the beans physically, and squash grows around them both. The original "design" concept was to plant it on a mound of soil, and in a circular method.

The beans naturally wind themselves up the corn stalks, which provides the support. The beans in turn, feed the corn by providing nitrogen to the soil. The squash, with its vines and trailing habit, winds it's way around the base of the corn and beans, hence becoming a barrier against weeds, as well as shading the soil, which helps retain moisture. Ingenious, really. : )

If you'd like to try planting in this method, I'd suggest first preparing the soil. Plenty of compost & organic matter should be used to offer the seeds a healthy beginning.

The wonderful thing about a Three Sisters Garden is that it can also be grown in a container.
If you don't have enough garden space, it's a fun way to garden, and children will love it too! Make sure however, that the container will have direct sunlight for at six hours or more, and of course, that the container has good drainage.

Start by planting the corn in the middle. Let the corn grow a few inches before sowing the beans directly around it. Then, plant the squash seed along the edge. Squash will trail, and can be trained to grow right around your container.
Keep the seeds moist and water well throughout the growing season. You'll likely have to water every day when growing anything, especially edibles, in containers, which will dry out much quicker than if planted directly in the ground.

Try planting heirloom varieties, enjoy your harvest, save the seeds, and have fun!
: )

 
 
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