Wall Flower Studio Garden

  (Algonquin Highlands, Ontario)
Organically Grown ~ From The Garden
[ Member listing ]

Help Protect Our Pollinators - The Bees Need Us. We Need Them, too!

~ A GLOBAL BEE EMERGENCY ~ Happening NOW ~

 

.............................

 

Quietly, around the world,

 

Billions of Honey Bees and other pollinators are dying.

 

.

 

This is more than alarming.

 

.

 

This is a fact.

 

It threatens our crops and food supply on a global basis, and in my opinion is more of a threat to our livelihood than anything else.

 

.

 

A global ban of one group of pesticides could save bees from extinction.

 

Yes, that's right.

 

It can make all the difference.

 

.

 

Four European countries have begun banning these poisons, which are called:

 

 

neonicotinoid pesticides.

 

.

 

There is evidence that due to the banning, some bee populations are recovering.

 

That's good news!

 

.

 

Here's the bad news...

 

Unfortunately, big chemical companies,

 

like Bayer,

 

(the culprit for this one, and just as insidious a corporation as)

 

Monsanto & Dow AgroSciences,

 

all of whom LOBBY really hard to keep all their killer poison pesticides on the market.

 

.....

 

A global outcry is now on for a ban in the U.S. the E.U. where debate is raging,

 

and hopefully here in Canada, too.

 

.

 

I'm hoping this will provoke an outcry from people like me, gardeners and people of all walks of life who want a total ban on these hazzardous poisons.

 

.

 

This could create a ripple effect around the world. : )

 

 

Let's build a giant global buzz calling for these dangerous chemicals to beoutlawed in the U.S., Canada, and EU until and unless they are proved to be safe, and I do not believe they are.

 

.

 

Please consider signing a petition to save bees and other pollinators, and our crops:

 

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/save_the_bees/

 

The Bees need us. And, we need them just as much, if not more.

 

........................

 

So, you ask...

 

What can we do in our own little way, in our own back yard, to help the Bees?

 

Here are some great tips & links!

 

 

1) Plant a pollinator-friendly garden

 

http://pollinationcanada.ca/?n=pc_lib_pfg*

 

 

2) Don't ever use pesticides or chemical fertilizers. They do more harm than good, and are not needed.

 

(Except to line the pockets of big Ag and Chem's greedy pockets.)

 

http://google.ca/search?q=organic+gardening*

 

 

3) Naturalize the garden. Or a part of it.

 

Plant native flowers in your yard.

 

They are suited to your area and landscape.

 

Native plants are partners with pollinators.

 

http://google.ca/search?q=wildflowers*

 

 

4) Become a backyard beekeeper.

 

I'm going to!! : )

 

http://google.ca/search?q=backyard+beekeeping*

 

 

5) Support conservation, wetland conservation, and biodiversity.

 

Once it's gone, that's all folks.

 

http://planetfriendly.net/dontpave.html#links*

 

 

6) Definitely avoid industrial food and GMOs at all cost.

 

Who need's Monsanto's poisons? Not me! Not you, either.

 

So, shop locally and organically whenever possible.

 

http://planetfriendly.net/organic.html#food*

 

 

7) Be a pollinator observer. I am!! And, it's fun for kids, too!

 

It's like a science experiment in your own back yard!

 

http://pollinationcanada.ca/?n=pc_be_an_observer*

 

 

8 ) Learn more about Bees & Pollinators and why everyone needs to get involved:

 

http://planetfriendly.net/wiki/?title=Save_the_Bees*

 

 

9) Live sustainably. It's all connected. We're all connected.

 

We can't just hop skip and jump to another planet if we destroy this one.

 

We have to take care of it now.

 

Even in small ways. It adds up.

 

------------------------------------------

 

An interesting fact from Pollination Canada

 

"Pollinating insects are "essential for over a billion dollars of apples, pears, cucumbers, melons, berries, and many other kinds of Canadian farm produce".

 

*

 

That's a lot to ask of these creatures.

 

The least we can do in return is to NOT poison them!

 

*

 

-------------------------------------------------------

 

More links about how to help our pollinators:

 

http://www.pollinationcanada.ca/

 

 

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign

 

http://pollinator.org/nappc/

 

 

Pollinator Partnership

 

http://pollinator.org/

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

And Don't forget to post your bee-friendly jobs, internships and volunteeropportunities with GoodWork: http://GoodWorkCanada.ca/

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.--

 

Again, my thanks to People and Planet Canada

 

Gateway to Environment and Sustainability Since 1998

 

Subscribe: http://www.planetfriendly.net/

 

.

 

Thanks for visiting! Happy Organic Gardening!

 

-----------------

Visit:  Wall Flower Studio

Thank you!

Dandelions - Embrace Them - They're Not the Enemy!

Call me crazy, but I like Dandelions.

 That's right. And, I couldn't help but think of them lately. Here's why: .

As I watch the news pertaining to events surrounding the ongoing tragedy happening to our Japanese friends, like many, I watch in horror.

The newscasters keep offering horrible news. Radiation levels in some parts of Japan has affected their food and water supply, milk and vegetables, and it's now spiked to dangerous and deadly levels.

While watching the news on comes a commercial break... I was about to get up and make a coffee, however... one commercial came on that caught my attention.

 It was a commercial for Roundup®. You know that stuff. It's a poisonous chemical herbicide, created by that giant chemical conglomerate, Monsanto. .

You've heard of Monsanto. They were the co-creators of Agent Orange.

 Wasn't that nice of them? . A real tribute to mankind. 

So, back to the Roundup. You know the stuff. It's the chemical you have to actually pay for, so that it can be sprayed in the garden, perhaps on food being grown, Food that you might feed to kids, friends and family members.

So, picture this... A cowering little Dandelion. A big bottle of Roundup®, aimed & ready to open fire on that Dandelion. . Talk about playing up to an old Wild West Mentality! I actually laughed at the absurdity of it all. Absurdity mixed with a heaping helping of disgust. .

This chemical company is telling me that a useful little yellow flower is my enemy!! .

What does Monsanto have against dandelions? What did a dandelion ever do to deserve such a powerful enemy? Why do they want to instil such hatred into my head for this little flower? . Dandelions have never done anything to me. Have they ever done anything to anyone? Not that I know of... .

So, I'll tell you why... It all comes down to corporate profit. . If Monsanto can't promote the dandelion as an enemy to you and me, no more profits for them or their shareholders.

. Well, I don't give a damn about Monsanto or their shareholders.

 There is cause and affect for everything we do. Perhaps people don’t realize that the chemicals sprayed in the garden has to go somewhere. It doesn't just miraculously go away..

It leaches down into the soil. . The earth we live on. . Right into our water supply. .

Hmm, I have a well on my property. I don't want to drink this poison, or have my children drink it either. .

That, my friends, would be asinine. It makes no sense. . Who in their right minds would want to choose to poison their own water hole?

. A 2008 scientific study has shown that Roundup formulations and metabolic products cause the death of human embryonic, placental, and umbilical cells in vitro, even at low concentrations. .

 So, my point is that there’s no need for Monsanto's poisons if Dandelions aren't really our enemy. Hmmm. That sounds pretty good!

 I mean, come on.... Is one plant, growing between the cracks in our patio's so hideous, and such a blight to our sensibilities as human beings, that we're ready to spray deadly and harmful poisons on our own property that in the end will only poison us, and which may subject us and our children to ill effects down the road? It makes no sense...  

. Consider this, a main active ingredient of Roundup is the surfactant POEA (polyethoxylated tallow amine), known for its toxicity in wildlife. It increases herbicide penetration in plant and animal cells.

 . Consider also the fact that several weed species, known as superweeds, have developed resistance to Monsanto's herbicides, largely because of repeated exposure.

. Superweeds?? This sounds like sci-fi thriller. But it's actually happening now. And, it's part of the reason our food costs are higher. . Monsanto now has to create more powerful herbicide chemicals to combat those superweeds they've created.

. Sounds like the lady who swallowed the fly... More absurdity. . Is a dandelion really worth all of this?

. If a weed really bothers a person, I ask them to please consider boiling kettle full of water and pouring that boiling water on the crack that contains that little dandelion.

. That'll do the trick. Really. It's that simple.

. Consider our children, our future, our planet.

. Consider the fact that using chemicals to spray a few weeds is overkill on so many levels.

. Consider the fact that our Japanese friends now have poisons on their food supply, through no choice of their own, and it will likely be there for a hundred years. It will make them sick if they eat it.

 Why would we, as intelligent as we think we are, fork out money and pay for a toxic product to willingly do this to ourselves??

Things to make with Dandelions:

Dandelion Wine

Dandelion Jelly .

Dandelion chains ( Remember doing this as a child?)

Dandelion leaves in salad. They're tasty and nutritious, too!

Dandelion Tea .

Thanks for visiting! Happy Organic Gardening!

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our Blog - Wall Flower Studio

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Basil - So versatile!

Basil  - Ocimum basilicum (a.k.a. Sweet Basil, Common Basil, Italian Basil) Probably the most popular herb in North America today. It's GREAT FOR COOKING!

A bit about growing Basil:
Height in inches: 24" - Spread: 12-15"
Germination: 7-10 days - Sowing depth: 1/8"
Planting Season: Sow outside in Spring 1-2 weeks after the last frost
Requirements: Likes full sun for best success. Plant in well-drained soil with plenty of organic matter. 
Out of the more than 150 varieties of Basil available, my personal favorites, Lemon Basil, Ocimum basilicum citrodorium, and the ever popular Italian Large Leaf Basil, aka: Genovese basil, are perfect for pesto and pasta sauces. I use it fresh and it tastes great with almost all dishes.
The Italian Large Leaf Basil has large dark green, shiny leaves that grow up to 3 inches long on a tall, upright plant. Thankfully, Basil has very few pests, and you can also use Basil as a companion plant to repel mites, and tomato worms. Tomatoes loves Basil!    

Basil loves to be pinched out the tips, which will encourage fuller plants, delaying flowers, and it going to seed. I suggest letting one plant go to seed so that you can grow them again in the garden next year, but of course Basil can be grown indoors on a sunny windowsill, so the seeds can be planted anytime!

Happy Gardening!

 
 

Hollyhocks - A True Farm or Cottage garden flower!

Hollyhock, (Alcea rosea), was once the most popular flower in gardens across North America, and is most certainly back in vogue today! It's stately beauty adds a real dimension of height at the back of a flower border. The hollyhock is well known in the English cottage garden, and reknown in any farm garden, standing above all else!

Many people don't realize just how easy this lovely and old fashioned flower is to grow from seed. I've actually had them grow between patio pavers, where there's relatively no soil, and seemingly no space! This speaks volumes of their drought tolerance and ability to grow in almost any type of medium.

The Hollyhock seeds I offer, (Click Here to view) are from ones originally grown at my family farm by my great-grandmother. One of my particular              favorites due to the personal history and link to my past. They are a lovely pink heirloom variety, (and because a water bottling facility backed on to our family farm, there were never any chemicals, herbicides or pesticides used at all). Growing organically is a valued and continued tradition of my past, and it's what I believe in and practice in my own garden.

Hollyhock seeds can be directly sown into your flower garden. I recommend that you start them indoors six to eight weeks before the last frost, as they may bloom the first year if that is done. Once in the garden, they need plenty of room. Spacing should be 18-24". Give them plenty of room to allow air circulation and minimize rust and other disease.

Some people will tell gardeners to cut back the stalks after they've finished blooming, but I let them go to seed, and collect the seeds for next year! "Sow" easy to do. You'll only have to buy them once!

Enjoy, and as always, " Happy Gardening " !

 

 
 

Coreopsis lanceolata - Another Useful Native!

Coreopsis lanceolata - Tickseed (Organic & Native)

Available here my Local Harvest Store. - 25 seeds/pkg. 

An exceptionally easy to grow flower that tolerates a wide range of soil conditions! Tickseed is drought tolerant, but can also withstand prolonged periods of moisture.

You can save the seeds from Coreopsis or let the birds have them. It's a real treat for them!
Coreopsis grows well in either a partially shaded or sunny location. The bright yellow flowers bloom on 2 to 3 feet tall stems.

This wonderful native flower blooms from June right through to September, once the plants are established, during the second year. The foliage of this flower makes an attractive ground cover the remainder of the year. It's a perennial.

None of the seeds I sell are genetically engineered. (I am against gmo's and have taken the safe seed pledge.)

Thanks for viewing, and Happy Gardening!

 
 

Beefsteak Tomato - The Oh So Meaty Fruit!

Beefsteak Tomato

 (Lycopersicon esculentum) 

 
The beefsteak tomato is an old-time heirloom favourite that has been popular for many years, due to its excellent productivity and wonderful taste.

 Because these tomatoes are amongst the most expensive tomatoes on the market,

it makes a lot of sense to grow your own!

When you you do decide to grow these lucious tomatoes, make sure to support the plants when they grow to 12 inches in height, with a tomato cage or stakes. You can even make a simple tepee frame for each plant. You're going to need it for these heavy tomatoes! Beefsteak tomatoes are one of the largest varieties of cultivated tomatoes, some weighing 2 lbs or more! Imagine that!

Don't forget to save your seeds for next year, too! Another cost saver for all gardeners! Happy Gardening!

The tomato seeds from Wall Flower Studio produce lush, thick, indeterminate, regular-leaf, tomato plants that yield from oh so vigorous vines. The 4 to 5-inch, slightly ribbed, bright-red tomatoes have a spectacularly delicious, sweet flavour.

This tomato's solid, juicy flesh, is excellent  for slicing into sandwhices, and the meaty flesh make it an ideal tomato for eating fresh, using in salads, and it's even great for canning! That's what I call a multi-purpose fruit. 

Wall Flower Studio's Beefsteak tomato seeds are heirlooms, organically grown, and all are packaged for 2010. Click here ---> Wall Flower Studio's Beefsteaks seeds.
 
 

Evening Primrose - Oenothera

 Oenothera biennis, or Evening Primrose, has been cultivated in
North America since the early 16th century.
It was originally grown as an edible plant, however the bright yellow flowers
make for a beautiful ornamental display in the garden.

Now, evening primrose is widely known for its medicinal properties.
The plant is usually grown as a biennial, which forms a rosette of leaves the first year and sends up 3’ – 4’ stems of flowers the second year,
however, I’ve had them bloom in the first.
 
These wonderful plants are extremely hardy, drought tolerant,
grow in any soil, and totally thrive on neglect! That's my kind of gardening!

Evening primrose seeds can be planted outdoors in fall, but they can also be
started indoors, under lights, in pots in early Spring.
The seeds are really small, so don’t plant them very deep or let them dry out.

Keeping the soil moist but not sodden and with the help of warm lights,
or a sunny, warm location, the seedlings should develop splendidly!

Plant them in a sunny location in your garden and they will do the rest!
(I have mine in the rock garden where the soil is atrocious, but they are thriving!)
Am listing Evening primrose here as I type, so please check back soon at my Local Harvest shop for available seed packet
Thank you & Happy gardening!
 
 

Sweet William - Dianthus barbatus

Pictured above is my Kitty-cat, Mrs. Woman. She LOVES Sweet William and guards it well. However, I've managed to save many, many seeds and I think I can sneak them out of the house without her knowing!

Sweet William - Dianthus barbatus.

Organic, heirloom and open-pollinated. Mixed colours, as you can see in the picture. Very Fragrant! 8" - 14" tall. Is hardy in Zones 3-9, and is considered a self seeding perennial that is treated as a biennial. A wonderful addition to any garden since all pollinators love them! 

Available for sale here. Click --> Wall Flower Studio Garden' Listing.

A Bit About Dianthus:

Dianthus are an old fashioned flower dating back 2000 years ago. They include pinks, carnations and Sweet William, among others. You'll find annuals, biennials and perennials in varied heights and characteristics. Some dianthus are hardy all the way to Zone 3! These wonderful little plants are survivors with a few quirky little traits. The carnations we buy from florists are a large hybrid variety grown specially for commercial use. All dianthus are charming and add an old fashioned touch to the garden.

Culture Notes:
Sweet William should not be mulched or over watered. They need plenty of air circulation, and do not like soil or mulch touching the stems and foliage. This too is another plant that needs deadheading to really give you it's full bloom. They also need 4-5 hours of sun per day and a fertile, well drained soil. When preparing the soil for dianthus add a little lime to sweeten the soil. Dianthus can be grown in container as well. Add a little grit, such as sand, to a standard potting mix for containers. "Sow" easy to grow! 

Happy Gardening!

 
 

Seedy Saturday - 2010 - On a Sunday!

Wall Flower Studio is pleased to announce we will once again be participating at Seedy Saturday (on a Sunday for 2010!), in Toronto.

People will be able to purchase organically grown products directly from me.
WIth more than 100 varieties of vegetables, herbs and heirloom flowers, plus my
plantable paper, seed balls and organically grown lavender,
I'm really looking so forward to meeting other like minded gardeners, and flower/veggie/plant enthusiasts!
Please click the links at the bottom for more information regarding the date, time and location.
At Seedy Saturday (on a Sunday, this year), you'll find organic and heirloom veggies & flower and herb seeds, as well as witnessing the amazing demo's and talks regarding gardening & growing food, which will help educate people about the need to save our own seeds and grow our own food.
This year the feature is on native gardening. Something we should all be doing, especially with regards to our declining pollinators.
Our planet has to have diversity to offer all the kinds of life that it supporst, and we need to promote ways that will be sustainable for years to come. This, and more, is all happening at Seedy Saturday (don't forget it's actually on a Sunday!!)

I just want to offer kudo's to all the people involved in this event. The ones who make it happen! Being an organic gardener and seed seller, as well an ecologically thinking person, I'm really looking forward to being a part of this year's Seedy Saturday (on a Sunday!).
It's all happening on Sunday, February 21st, 2010 - 12:30 to 6:00 pm
All this is thanks to: ~ Toronto Community Garden Network, ~The Stop, and
Hope to see you there!
 
 

Lavender - So Lovely - So Useful

Wall Flower Studio's Lavender Sachets contain100% organically                grown lavender flowers. The lovely sachets are packed in a 3" x 4" organza drawstring bag. Great for your linen/woolen's closet, lingerie and sweater drawers, on bed pillows, anywhere you want the lingering fragrance of calming, relaxing lavender.

Wall Flower Studio's Cotton/muslin bags can be tossed in the bath for you, and then added to the dryer where they'll lightly scent your clothes. And, the best part is that they can be re-used many times!                                  Lavender has been used for centuries because of its soothing, relaxing properties. It has many practical uses today that are just as effective as those described in history and folklore and is the most versatile of essential oils.  Its many benefits include:                                                                                For the mind...
Nurturing and calming & Soothing
Antidepressant
Settles irritability, gentle sedating, restores mind and body to so healing can take place
For skin care.....
Soothing irritations
Healing
For the body.....
Activates the immune system
Good for first aid and as an insect repellent

Lavender's magical influences are: Health, Love, Celibacy, Peace, and a conscious mind.It is great to use when you are depressed or angry.
Lavender sachets are also GREAT to use as a Wedding Favors.or tossing the flowers instead of rice. Wall Flower Studio's Lavender is:
- 100% Chemical-Free- Very fragrant & apretty color!-
I am positive you will love this Lavender!
Happy Gardening : )
 

Linaria purpurea - Purple Toadflax - A lovely & Drought tolerant perennial!

Linaria purpurea .. Seed packet .. Pink to Purple Flowers .. Drought tolerant .. Blooms all season ..
Purple Toadflax - Linaria purpurea
~ hardiness zones 3 - 9 USDA ~
This plant is an underrated treasure. It should be grown in every garden.
It's totally drought tolerant, easy to grow, and the blooms look like miniature light purple snapdragons.
Lovely upright perennial that self-seeds easily, but not at all hard to remove if it ends up growing where you may not want it.
Bees and butterflies and other pollinators just LOVE them!
Bonus: Deer don't touch them!
This hardy plant blooms for months on end, (June until Frost). That alone makes it a winner for my garden!
Grows in any soil type but prefers it to be somewhat well-drained
Loves full sun, however, mine is growing splendidly in part shade.
Grows to a height of 36" with a spread of about 24".
*(Now Available at --->  Wall Flower Studio's LH listing)
Wall Flower Studio's garden is proudly pesticide and herbicide free.
 
Thanks for viewing and Happy Gardening!
 
 

Rudbeckia - Black Eyed Susan - Lovely Native Flowers

I love Black-Eyed Susans, (otherwise known as Rudbeckia). This is not just because of their natural beauty, but also because the deer don't eat them in my garden! I've heard that rabbits do like Rudbeckia, but fortunately, I have 2 cats, and that seems to keep those pesky rabbits away. : )

There are about 25 species in the Rudbeckia genus, all native to the plains and prairies of the Midwest. Growing native plants is especially important to provide food for our pollinators, and because native plants grow very happily in their own habitat.

Rudbeckia species are obviously referred to as Black-Eyed Susans because of their dark-brown central disk flowers which are surrounded by bright yellow daisy-like flowers.
Many species freely self-seed if not dead-headed, which will result in many small plants growing en masse throughout the garden. A beautiful look in any garden or meadow!

Black Eyed Susans will reach 2 feet; it's a perennial that blooms from late June right into Autumn and is hardy in Canada to zone 4, and in the U.S.A., it's hardy to zone 3.

Thank you, and Happy Gardening!

 
 

Dill - Anethum graveolens - 2010 Herb of the Year!

Celebrate this year’s Herb of the Year ~ Dill!
Dill is a member of the parsley family. It's similar to Fennel, and is an annual plant that grows to a height of approx. 4 feet tall. It's a strong smelling plant with yellow flowers that develop those lovely fruiting umbels.
Dill grows well in a sunny spot with well drained organic soil. Any soil suitable for growing vegetables will be just perfect.
Dill's common use is for flavoring pickles and for it's preserving properties with fruit and vegetables. The leaves make a great garnish, chopped onto meats and veg dishes.

The variety of dill that I offer is called `Bouquet''.
The seeds are planted ¼ - ½ inch deep and thinned to about one plant every 12 inches. The seedlings can be transplanted if one is careful, so they can be started indoors in Spring before the last frost. Bouquet matures in about 60 days.

When harvesting seeds from Dill, hang the cut stems upside down in bundles with paper bags tied over the flower heads. Make sure to leave some dill flowers on to get a constant supply of the seeds!
Recommended Temperature Zone: USDA: 5-10. Frost Tolerance: Hardy to -20°F (-29°C)

Happy Gardening : )
 
 

Edible Flowers - A Beautiful Salad in your own Garden!

~Flowers are high in vitamins and minerals and all are rich in nectar & pollen.

~Rose hips have a high in vitamin C content, as well as nasturtium & marigolds.

~Dandelion flowers contain vitamins A and C. Add them to your salads!!

Edible flowers should be picked in the morning after the dew has gone. You should pick fully open flowers, and of course, should sample several different varieties of flowers before harvesting.
Never eat flowers that have been in contact with any chemicals and poisons such as pesticides or herbicides. Organic is the way to go!

Much like growing grapes for making wine, flowers of the same variety but grown in different locations will have slightly different tastes, due to varying soil types & environmental conditions.

Flowers might also taste a little different at the end of the growing season too, and can vary from year to year.
The best part you ask!!! Flowers are mostly free of calories!

***....NEVER eat ANYTHING from the garden if you don’t know what it is first!!

List of Some Edible Flowers

  •    Bachelor button
  • Beebalm
  • Borage
  • Calendula
  • Chamomile
  • Chive flowers
  • Dandelion
  • Daylily
  • Dianthus
  • Hibiscus
  • Impatiens
    Lavender
  • Lilac
  • Marigold
  • Mint
  • Nasturtium
  • Pansy
  • Roses -Rose hips
  • Sage
  • Squash blossom
  • Violet
  • Happy Gardening!

Have a Green Eco-Friendly Event!

A Green Idea!
These days, thankfully, many people are opting to plan green events.
We are all seeking ways to celebrate and give gifts that are not going to be added to landfil. Making environmentally friendly decisions throughout the planning process can be easy!
  
Here is my green idea: And not only as wedding favours, but gift tags, name/place cards, business cards, or even bookmarks! Plantable Paper!
This can help ease the burden and lessen your carbon footprint on our planet.
Whether you are committed to a completely green wedding/party/shower, or wish to do what you can in safeguarding our planet, these "green" plantable paper shapes will get you on your way.
Many colours available.
Pink, Green, Petalled, Purple, Blue and Yellow.
Butterflies shown. (Approx. 5" wide )
Native, and open-pollinated, organically grown seeds, embedded in 100% recycled post consumer, handmade paper.
They can be used as business cards, gift tags, or name tags for dinner parties!
So many wonderful uses. ~ Please feel free to inquire.
Seed List
-Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
-Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja spp.)
-Blazing Star (Liatris pycnostachya)
-Prairie Coneflower (Ratibida columnifera)
-Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)
-Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata)
-Red Columbine (Aquilegia formosa)
-Blanket Flower (Gaillardia aristata)
-Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)
-Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa)
-Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)
-Shooting Star (Dodecatheon hendersonii)
-Chocolate Lily (Fritillaria lanceolata)
-Shrubby Penstemon (Penstemon fruticosus)
-Common Camas (Camassia quamash)
-Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium)
-Turk’s-cap Lily (Lilium michiganense)
-Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus)
-Larkspur (Delphinium nuttallianum)
-New England Aster (Aster novae-angliae)
-Fawn Lily (Erythronium oregonum)
-Wild Bergamot (Monarda fistulosa)
-Ox-eye daisy (Heliopsis helianthoides)
Thank you & Happy Gardening!
 
 
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