Wall Flower Studio Garden

  (Algonquin Highlands, Ontario)
Organically Grown ~ From The Garden
[ Member listing ]

Creating Eco-friendly, Recycled Newspaper Seed Starting Pots @ Wall Flower Studio

Well, I finally broke down and purchased a pot maker.

 I'm really glad that I did!

It's "sow" easy to use, and, the pots are the perfect seed starting size every time!

 The fact that I'm using recycling newspaper, which will quickly break down, and won't harm the environment played the biggest part in my decision to try this.

. Sure, peat pots are easy to use, but I'd found that peat seems to suck up moisture really quick, which means the soil they contain, and the seedlings in them, dry out much quicker than the newspaper cups do, which means more watering.

 Not to mention the cost of them! I start hundreds of seed pots each year. This can really add up. . Plus, since I'm trying my best to be ecologically aware and I try to do what I can for the environment, I'd like to share some information about why using peat pots to start seeds isn't such a great idea. .

The effects on the dwindling wetlands and peat bogs has me concerned. I don't want to take from nature what is not renewable, if given the choice. .

After much reading, I've discovered that Peat bogs are actually a finite, non-renewable resource. Since the 1960's, there has been a threat to these valuable bogs.

The bogs that produce the peat suitable for horticulture used to be cut out slowly by hand, but now the horticultrual industry extracts it so efficiently & thoroughly with huge machines.

The process of extraction is sausage extrusion and surface milling..

Just knowing this has openend my eyes and now my choice clear.. Newspaper!

 Happy Gardening!

 
 

Dill - Anethum graveolens - 2010 Herb of the Year!

Celebrate this year’s Herb of the Year ~ Dill!
Dill is a member of the parsley family. It's similar to Fennel, and is an annual plant that grows to a height of approx. 4 feet tall. It's a strong smelling plant with yellow flowers that develop those lovely fruiting umbels.
Dill grows well in a sunny spot with well drained organic soil. Any soil suitable for growing vegetables will be just perfect.
Dill's common use is for flavoring pickles and for it's preserving properties with fruit and vegetables. The leaves make a great garnish, chopped onto meats and veg dishes.

The variety of dill that I offer is called `Bouquet''.
The seeds are planted ¼ - ½ inch deep and thinned to about one plant every 12 inches. The seedlings can be transplanted if one is careful, so they can be started indoors in Spring before the last frost. Bouquet matures in about 60 days.

When harvesting seeds from Dill, hang the cut stems upside down in bundles with paper bags tied over the flower heads. Make sure to leave some dill flowers on to get a constant supply of the seeds!
Recommended Temperature Zone: USDA: 5-10. Frost Tolerance: Hardy to -20°F (-29°C)

Happy Gardening : )

Evening Primrose - Oenothera - Lovely and Drought Tolerant!

North America since the early 16th century.
It was originally grown as an edible plant, however the bright yellow flowers
make for a beautiful ornamental display in the garden.

Now, evening primrose is widely known for its medicinal properties.
The plant is usually grown as a biennial, which forms a rosette of leaves the first year
and sends up 3’ – 4’ stems of flowers the second year,
however, I’ve had them bloom in the first.
These wonderful plants are extremely hardy, drought tolerant,
grow in any soil, and totally thrive on neglect! That's my kind of gardening!

Evening primrose seeds can be planted outdoors in fall, but they can also be
started indoors, under lights, in pots in early Spring.
The seeds are really small, so don’t plant them very deep or let them dry out.

Keeping the soil moist but not sodden and with the help of warm lights,
or a sunny, warm location, the seedlings should develop splendidly!

Plant them in a sunny location in your garden and they will do the rest!
 
 

Have a Green Eco-Friendly Event!

A Green Idea!
These days, thankfully, many people are opting to plan green events.
We are all seeking ways to celebrate and give gifts that are not going to be added to landfil. Making environmentally friendly decisions throughout the planning process can be easy!
  
Here is my green idea: And not only as wedding favours, but gift tags, name/place cards, business cards, or even bookmarks! Plantable Paper!
This can help ease the burden and lessen your carbon footprint on our planet.
Whether you are committed to a completely green wedding/party/shower, or wish to do what you can in safeguarding our planet, these "green" plantable paper shapes will get you on your way.
Many colours available.
Pink, Green, Petalled, Purple, Blue and Yellow.
Butterflies shown. (Approx. 5" wide )
Native, and open-pollinated, organically grown seeds, embedded in 100% recycled post consumer, handmade paper.
They can be used as business cards, gift tags, or name tags for dinner parties!
So many wonderful uses. ~ Please feel free to inquire.
Seed List
-Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
-Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja spp.)
-Blazing Star (Liatris pycnostachya)
-Prairie Coneflower (Ratibida columnifera)
-Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)
-Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata)
-Red Columbine (Aquilegia formosa)
-Blanket Flower (Gaillardia aristata)
-Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)
-Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa)
-Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)
-Shooting Star (Dodecatheon hendersonii)
-Chocolate Lily (Fritillaria lanceolata)
-Shrubby Penstemon (Penstemon fruticosus)
-Common Camas (Camassia quamash)
-Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium)
-Turk’s-cap Lily (Lilium michiganense)
-Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus)
-Larkspur (Delphinium nuttallianum)
-New England Aster (Aster novae-angliae)
-Fawn Lily (Erythronium oregonum)
-Wild Bergamot (Monarda fistulosa)
-Ox-eye daisy (Heliopsis helianthoides)
Thank you & Happy Gardening!
 
 

Winter Is For The Birds! :: Home Made Suet Balls

[Suet+balls+blog+1.jpg]

Feeding Feathered Friends in Winter - Fun - Easy - Economical!

Ingredients:
-1 pound lard or fat
- 3/4 cup peanut butter
-1/2 cup flour
- 1/2 cup cornmeal
- 1 cup sugar
- approximately half a loaf of bread crumbs
- 1-1/2 cups of mixed seeds, nuts and chopped dried fruits

Directions:
-Melt the lard and peanut butter over low heat. Mix flour, cornmeal, and sugar and stir in.
-Add enough bread crumbs to absorb all liquid.
-Add fruit, seeds, and nuts as desired.
-Pour into a 9 x 5? bread pan (lined with plastic wrap), or pour into suet cake molds.
(molds can be saved from store-bought suet.)
-Allow to cool completely.
-Keep refrigerated or in a cool place like a basement.

One batch makes about four cakes.
Have fun!

 
 

Saving Seeds

Some reasons to save seeds 

 1) Saving seeds appeals to my      motto of "waste not want not".

  I hate to see anything good go unused, and the economical reasons alone, especially in today's financial climate, makes a ton of sense.
Seed savers knows that by gathering up seeds and storing them carefully away for next year's garden is preservation for next year's crop, and less money to fork out.

2.) Personal selection.

I like the thought of developing my own vigorous strains over several seasons of selective seed saving. Saving seeds from the plants with the qualities you most prize, you will soonhave varieties that are ideally adapted to your garden and growing conditions.

3) Maintain bio-diversity.
 
Fewer and fewer old varieties of food crops are available, so seed saving keeps the vegetable world's food choices diversified.
Today many of the world's food plants are disappearing, including vegetables, grains and fruit varieties. Approx. 70 % of the world's major food plants have already been lost. This is because modern agriculture practices require high yield, uniform plants, so the genetic base of the world's food plants has been greatly reduced. This has left the world dependent on a few, closely related varieties of each crop.

4) Historical value.

Many plant varieties we save or trade are living links to the past.
Seed saving is a way to link with our ancestors. As gardener's this is a responsibility and opportunity to pass these wonderful heirlooms to future generations.

5) Sustainability.
 
We don't need big corporate seed companies taking care of us and choosing the foods and flowers that we can grow. Many of these companies sell varieties that are tasteless, but travel well. That's not a good enough reason for me. Self reliance is very satisfying. It is our right to save seeds and make sure that there is enough variety on the planet which makes for bio-diversity. It's the cycle of life.

Seed Banks and Saving Sites to Survey
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.seeds.ca/
Seeds Of Diversity ~ (My personal favourite and I'm a member). Canada's Heritage Seed Program - A non-profit group of gardeners who save seeds from rare and unusual garden plants for the purpose of preserving varieties
Purchase the manual - "How to Save Seeds" from their website!

www.planetnatural.com/site/xdpy/kb/herloom-seeds.html
Both beginning and experienced gardeners can easily learn how to save all of their own heirloom seeds
.

 
 
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