Wall Flower Studio Garden

  (Algonquin Highlands, Ontario)
Organically Grown ~ From The Garden
[ Member listing ]

Chelone - Turtlehead - Hot Lips!

This beautiful "Pink Turtlehead", (Chelone lyonii - Hot Lips) blooms from late July right through to October. It's a North American native perennial flower that hosts the Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly.
Chelone comes from the Greek word that means tortoise because each blossom resembles, (without too much imagination required), a turtle's head.
It's a good perennial for late summer colour. It doesn't like excessive heat, but will tolerate full Sun if it has it's requirement of moist soil. Actually, the soggier the soil, the better it will perform in your garden!
The flowers are cross-pollinated primarily by bumblebees, but I've seen the Ruby-Throated Hummingbird visiting my flowers for their nectar. But, here is the best part of all... The bitter foliage is usually avoided by Deer and other herbivores. Hooray!!
I've yet to see a white variety growing, but from what I've read, they too are happiest in damp locations such as ditches beside the road. This lovely pink/purple version grows in my shade garden and is considered a rare and possibly endangered species. I have collected a limited amount of seeds from them, so if you're intersted, email/query me here:
- sloanartgallery(at)gmail(dot)com
Culture/Info:
  • Foliage: Herbaceous smooth-textured.
  • Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings.
  • This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds.
  • Propagation Methods: By dividing the rootball or from seed; direct sow outdoors in fall or early spring.
  • Stratify seeds if sowing indoors.
  • Seed Collecting: Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds.
  • Non-patented native perennial
  • Height: 24-36 in. (60-90 cm)
 
 

Hemerocallis - The Delectable Daylily - A Perennial Favorite!

 Double daylily at Wall Flower Studio

Day lilies are most likely the easiest perennial you could ever grow.

They flourish in almost all soils, (sandy to clay), but giving them soil that is rich in organic matter, or compost, is always a plus for most any plant.

In my garden, I have daylilies growing in full sun, however, I've happily discovered that they will also tolerate a good amount of shade.

If they were to be a little particular about anything, it would be their preference to neutral soils. Any garden with too much of an acid or alkaline base will not do for growing daylily plants!

They are really hardy, which suits this gardener well, especially in our Canadian climate, (zone 4b here), and as far as I can tell, they are free from pests and diseases, except for slugs, which do some damage to the leaves during an overly wet Summer, which this has been.

The picture above is from my own garden. A huge double daylily. I want more of these! Truly scrumptious looking!

(I'm thinking the orange colour of the daylily is complimented nicely with the purple Astilbe in the background)

The only thing I don't like about daylilies is that each flower don't last longer, hence the name. Happily, though, there's always new varieties to purchase every year to add with your garden's collection.

Happy Gardening!
Hemerocallis links
~Canadian Hemerocallis society
~BBC - Gardening - Daylily
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