Wall Flower Studio Garden

  (Algonquin Highlands, Ontario)
Organically Grown ~ From The Garden
[ Member listing ]

Have a Green Eco-Friendly Event!

A Green Idea!
These days, thankfully, many people are opting to plan green events.
We are all seeking ways to celebrate and give gifts that are not going to be added to landfil. Making environmentally friendly decisions throughout the planning process can be easy!
  
Here is my green idea: And not only as wedding favours, but gift tags, name/place cards, business cards, or even bookmarks! Plantable Paper!
This can help ease the burden and lessen your carbon footprint on our planet.
Whether you are committed to a completely green wedding/party/shower, or wish to do what you can in safeguarding our planet, these "green" plantable paper shapes will get you on your way.
Many colours available.
Pink, Green, Petalled, Purple, Blue and Yellow.
Butterflies shown. (Approx. 5" wide )
Native, and open-pollinated, organically grown seeds, embedded in 100% recycled post consumer, handmade paper.
They can be used as business cards, gift tags, or name tags for dinner parties!
So many wonderful uses. ~ Please feel free to inquire.
Seed List
-Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
-Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja spp.)
-Blazing Star (Liatris pycnostachya)
-Prairie Coneflower (Ratibida columnifera)
-Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)
-Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata)
-Red Columbine (Aquilegia formosa)
-Blanket Flower (Gaillardia aristata)
-Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)
-Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa)
-Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)
-Shooting Star (Dodecatheon hendersonii)
-Chocolate Lily (Fritillaria lanceolata)
-Shrubby Penstemon (Penstemon fruticosus)
-Common Camas (Camassia quamash)
-Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium)
-Turk’s-cap Lily (Lilium michiganense)
-Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus)
-Larkspur (Delphinium nuttallianum)
-New England Aster (Aster novae-angliae)
-Fawn Lily (Erythronium oregonum)
-Wild Bergamot (Monarda fistulosa)
-Ox-eye daisy (Heliopsis helianthoides)
Thank you & Happy Gardening!
 
 

Vermicomposting - Composting With Worms!

Vermicomposting Is Composting With Worms

It's very easy to do, really. Earthworms turn your organic waste into beautiful compost. It's by far, the best way to compost kitchen waste.

Worm castings contain five times more nitrogen, seven times more phosphorus, and 11 times more potassium than ordinary soil, the main minerals needed for plant growth.

The casts are also rich in humic acids, which condition the soil, have a perfect pH balance, and contain plant growth factors similar to those found in seaweed. What could be better for your garden?
In Canada, where snow covers our composters and gardens, we all make excuses as to why we are putting vegetable scraps in the landfil instead of the garden, but vermicomposting can be done year round, right in your kitchen, and without any smell!

Here's how:

Purchase a plastic storage tote from the hardware store.
It is best to drill ¼-inch holes in the bottom, sides and top of the box, not just for drainage but for aeration. You don't want the worms smother!
The box should one square foot of surface area for each person in the household.
e.g: A 2' x 2' x 2' box can take the food waste of four people.
Bedding materials can include shredded newspaper, corrugated cardboard, peat moss, and partially decomposed leaves.
Worm boxes should be filled with bedding to provide the worms with a mixed diet as well as a damp and aerated place to live.
Tear newspaper or cardboard into strips before first. Bedding material should be moistened by in water for several minutes. Squeeze out excess water before adding it to your worm box.
Cover food waste with a few inches of bedding so flies won't becom a problem.
Red wigglers are the best for vermicomposting. They thrive on organic material such as yard waste and fruit and vegetable scraps.

Do feed them:
Coffee grounds or filters
Fruit and vegetable scraps
Small plant material
Tea leaves with bags

Do NOT feed them:
Bones
Milk and Dairy products
Fish
Greasy foods
Meat
Peanut butter
Pet/cat litter/feces
Vegetable oil/salad dressing

To Harvest castings, feed one end of the box for a week or more. Most worms will find their way to that side. Remove two-thirds of the worm castings from the opposite end and apply fresh bedding . Start burying food waste in the new bedding, and the worms will move back.

Here are some great links to get you started... Have fun!! : )
~A fun way for educators to Introduce Children to Vermicomposting



Or...Build your own bin. Click here:
 
 
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