Boulder Belt Eco-Farm

  (Eaton, Ohio)
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Boulder Belt Farm Share Inititiative vol 2 issue 20 (week 20)

 

 

Wow it is week 20! Where has the time gone? It seems like August has sped by (unlike July which hung on for years and years). This means to all of you doing a full season or 3 month share you got 6 more weeks. Those of you going month to month have 4 weeks left. we will be doing a winter share starting the first Wednesday in November. Let me know ASAP if you want in on this. We need to get some sort of head count so we know how much to plant in hoop houses this fall. Also, we have many people interested in the winter share but I want give you first refusal (as they say in the realty biz). Unlike the main season, we do pick up every other week and you get a lot more food in your share (most of which can be stored for months on end so no rush to eat/preserve everything).

It is August and that means we are going into our most bountiful time of the year. I have been spending a lot of time putting up tomatoes (so far a lot of juice and about 1/3 the sauce I plan on making and canning), melons and making jam. Soon I will freeze peppers, make and can salsa and ratatouille, make apple sauce which will either be frozen or canned and dry apples. Hopefully, there will be enough green beans to freeze as well (but this dry weather is causing bad things to happen to the beans and you get them all this week, so none for us to put up). Doing all this work means we will eat well all winter and this is what our ancestors did in order to survive winters well. Doing this putting food by thing also means one must change how they look at and think about food. We modern Americans hardly give food any thought at all anymore as we can what we want when we want it literally 24/7. Of course, the food is usually adulterated, covered in chemicals and grown who knows where, low in nutrients, low in flavor and can even be the cause of poisoning. This is the price we pay for the "privilege" to be mindless about what we eat.

To be mindful as you all are finding out, means a lot more work just obtaining food (you joined a CSA and make weekly trips out to the farm to get your seasonal food). Plus you have to think about food much more. You have to start thinking about seasonality and what that means to your food choices. And when you take the next step-putting up food for winter you have start learning how to think ahead 3 to 6 months in the future as to what you will be eating. As farmers we long ago found you have to think ahead a minimum of 5 years when farming Organically in order for the crop rotation and soil fertility plans to work. we also have planted crops such as grapes, peaches and paw paws that take years and years to get to the point of bearing fruit. We hope next year we will have enough grapes to supply the FSI (we should have this year but got well under 4 pounds out of 30+ plants, such is life. We have been waiting on these things for 5 years). The paw paws will be another 4 to 6 years before we get anything and the peaches get attacked by deer and have yet been able to grow more than 5' tall (bucks rub their racks on the poor trees and break them off). At least the apples we planted when we moved here are beginning to produce. But I digress, back to long term thinking about food. farming forces one to take a really long view. Putting food up for winter forces one to think about food 6 to 12 months out. I do this pretty much with no thought anymore. I just know that when certain crops come in it is time to pull out the canning and dehydrating equipment and get working. But I also deal with people who are just getting into this sort of thing and know they face great disappointment when they waited too long to buy their canning maters or cannot find any bushels of green beans because 10 years ago we farmers found the market for bulk foods had disappeared so we all quit growing for that market and went with the much more lucrative selling by the piece or pound market (we make 2 to 3 times more this way than selling in bulk). The lesson here is, if you want to put up lots of food either grow your own rather large canning garden or contact growers before the season starts and ask if they will/do grow bulk quantities of what ever it is you want to put up for winter (and see, here is the whole "you have to think months ahead" idea again.).

Now all that said, we do have in bulk quantity Amish paste tomatoes, sweet peppers (or will in about a week), apples and it looks like pears (but they won't be ready for another 3 to 4 weeks). If you are interested let me know. The bulk tomatoes will last maybe another 2 weeks, the rest at least 3 weeks (probably longer). Let me know if you are interested in buying any of these things and I can give you prices and amounts.

The shares will be ready after 4 pm and like last week there will be two bags for everyone. One in the fridge and the rest (tomatoes) on the shelving by the fridge. Thanks to everyone who has been returning their containers, rubber bands, bags, etc., to us, keep 'em coming. It may not be much but every little bit we keep out of the landfill counts.

Okay here is this week's recipe (which i realize the share does not have all the ingredients for, oh well)

Ratatouille
1 or 2 eggplant, cubed
several tomatoes, cubed
1 medium yellow or red onion cubed
1 bell pepper (green or ripe) cubed
2+ garlic cloves minced/pressed
1 medium zucchini cubed
8 oz container of mushrooms sliced
1 TBL dried basil
1 TSP dried oregano
1 TBL dried parsley
1/2 cup grated parmesan
olive oil
salt to taste

In a hot pan over medium heat add the olive oil, onions, shrooms, zukes, eggplant and peppers and cook stirring regularly. When the onions get translucent than add everything else except the cheese and cook covered (lower the heat a bit) for about 20 minutes. Now add the cheese, taste and adjust seasoning if needed and cook another 5 to 10 minutes. Serve over pasta. This will store in the fridge about a week and freezes well (without the cheese).

What's in the share

Pepper-several green to ripening sweet peppers.
Hot peppers- several jalapenos and cayennes. I have found the jalapenos to not be hot, is that your experience? Please let me know
Eggplant-several black bells and one white. I was hoping to include the other two types but after yesterday's harvest had less than 3 of each. Such is life on the farm.
Garlic-a couple of purple Glazer this week
Tomatoes-around the same amount of large tomatoes you got last week. around 1/3 of the cherry tomatoes you got last week.
Blue Lake Green beans-you will get close to 1.5 pounds this week. The heat and dry conditions have brought out the bugs so these beans are damaged but still very very usable (they just look ugly). This will be the last of the beans for a while. We do have more plantings coming up and hopefully the insect damage will be far less in September/October
Potatoes-you will get either red or white taters. Hopefully next week Eugene will decide to dig up some of the exotics like the fingerlings, German Butter Ball and Blue
Watermelon-a red water melon this week, i don't know what type as we grow 4 different ones. But it should be good
Cantaloupe-another cantaloupe this week, likely the last week for these melons
Raspberries-1 box of sweet berries, like the melons this is likely the last week for raspberries
Arugula-another bag of our arugula
Apples-The first of the fall apples. We believe they are an old apple called Dr. Matthew's (this is what the apple guy at the Oxford farmers Market said they could be). They are sweet/tart and crisp and unlike the vast majority of apples raised with no chemicals (which means they can be less than perfect). You get 8 of them

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