Zina's Produce

  (Williamsburg, Virginia)
A Country Affair Farm
[ Member listing ]

How did you get those little wings out of that cake?

The other day I told my daughter " If ever I leave this world ,please do not think  you have to hold on to ALL of my cook books". This is a load I would not put on anyone. Our library has a great selection of books to buy. 1.00 for hardback and .50 for paper. I am always walking out with one or two..... Recipes that follow stories are my fav. It is not enough that I eat it I have to read about it too! Where it came from, what events are set around it, is it old..... So I always include a story about what it is I am sharing with people, something they can share when they prepare it. In a way I'm selling it, making sure you know you have to try this recipe.  I can sell anything! My friend said "I can sell ketchup to a lady in white gloves". The recipes I write about are worthy to be made, or I wouldn't waste my time. I have plenty of recipes not worth making much less writing about. This is not one of them. People love a story with a recipe. So here goes!  My friend told me that while traveling with her family in Savannah GA. They saw a huge wedding cake being brought out from a van. When asked "What kind of  cake is that"? The chef replied, a traditional Savannah wedding cake. "Hummingbird Cake". That evening while dinning, there it was. They all shared, as it was a huge. They were instantly in love. This was sometime back, before internet was assessable. The recipe was very hard to find. Finally a friend, who had collected recipes for years, had it!  What we do know is that the recipe gained widespread popularity after it appeared in the February 1978 issue of Southern Living Magazine. We also know that the recipe was submitted by a Mrs L H Wiggins of Greensboro North Carolina and consists of two layers of cake full of chopped pecans, crushed pineapple, and mashed bananas that are filled and frosted with a delicious cream cheese icing. I love Southern Living recipes, so the fact that it is the most requested recipe EVER! I had to have it. It is moist, nutty, fruity, and even better the next day. No one seems to know it origins; ingredients suggest it is from Jamaica. There are two schools of thought about this cake and why it is named after a hummingbird. One is that it is so sweet hummingbirds are attracted to it, and the other is you hum when you eat it.  You tell me. I hope you enjoy it as much as my family has.


                            Hummingbird Cake

 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt                                                                   

2 teaspoons baking soda
3 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon                
1 1/4 cups vegetable oil
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 can (8oz) crushed pineapple, well drained
1 cup chopped pecans                                                              

 2 cups ripe banana
Cream Cheese Frosting:
16 ounces cream cheese softened
1 cup butter, room temperature
2 pounds confectioners sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/2 to 1 cup chopped pecans
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Preheat oven to 350°.
Sift flour, sugar, salt, baking soda and cinnamon together into mixing bowl several times.
Add eggs and oil to the dry ingredients. Stir with a wooden spoon until ingredients are moistened
Stir in vanilla, pineapple and 1 cup pecans.
Stir in the bananas
Spoon the batter into 3 well-greased and floured 9-inch round cake pans
Bake for 25 to 30 minutes,or until a wooden pick or cake tester inserted in center comes out clean.
Cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn onto cooling rack.
Cool completely before frosting.
Cream Cheese Frosting:
Combine cream cheese and butter; cream until smooth. Add powdered sugar, beating with an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Stir in vanilla.
Frost the tops layers, stack and then frost sides. Sprinkle top evenly with the 1/2 to 1 cup chopped pecans

 
 

County Fair, funnel cakes, kettle corn,pickles, blue ribbons...

Our County Fair is fast approaching! My son and I love to enter things in the fair, always hoping for a blue ribbon! He sells Justin's Ranger Cookies at our market and he always tells a joke when you buy a cookie. “Why did the cookie go to the doctor” ? "Because he felt crummy”. He has won a blue ribbon for his cookies, but the customers love his jokes! He is quite the entrepreneur. He is going to sell fish bait (worms) for the campers who come to our produce market. He already sells them  fire wood . He is as excited as I am about the Fair, we talk about it all the time. What jams and pickles should mom bring. What should we bake? But there are times when we can't wait to eat funnel cakes , kettle corn, corn dogs,fried Oreos ,let me stop! I have included a few  recipes for you to make at home. You don’t have to have a big fancy kettle to make kettle corn . It’s fun and easy. Moms Dill pickles are always a treat, the best I have ever had. And a simple funnel cake recipe. Enjoy! See you at the Fair!

               Easy Kettle Corn Recipe

Ingredients:
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup popcorn kernels
1/3 cup sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt

*Special Equipment – A large pot with lid

Directions:
Heat oil in a large pot over medium-high heat.  Add popcorn and sugar giving it a quick stir and then cover with lid.  Once popcorn starts popping, pick it up and give it a quick shake every few seconds until popping slows down, between 3-4 minutes.  Remove immediately from heat and pour into a large bowl.  Sprinkle with salt and serve immediately.  Do not make the mistake of removing the pot from heat without transferring to a bowl. Due to the high heat of the pot, if you don’t transfer the popcorn it will caramelize and perhaps burn

 

                   Keuchels (German Funnel Cake)

Keuchels (KEE-kulls) are wonderful things! They are puffy, round pieces of fried dough which are thick and chewy around the edges and thin and crunchy in the middle. A proper keuchel should be about the size of a luncheon plate and be a lovely, golden brown color. This is an old German recipe, similar to a funnel cake!

Mix well:

 1 qt. milk

1 c. sugar

1 stick margarine or butter

Dissolve a yeast cake in ½ c. warm water.

Knead together 8 c. flour and 6 eggs. Add the yeast and the milk mixture. Knead well. Cover and let raise.

Pinch off pieces by the handful and shape into round, flat shapes that are thicker toward the edge and flat toward the middle. Drop into a fryer of hot oil and fry until golden and floating. Drain well and sprinkle with powdered sugar. Eating them warm with jam or fresh fruit on top is a real treat.

Mom’s Best Dill Pickles
They are the very best pickles she has ever tasted or made.
Boil together:
3 quarts water
1 quart vinegar
½ cup salt
1/4 cup sugar
1/8 tsp alum
Pack 20 to 24 small cucumbers into glass jars. Add 2 cloves of garlic and a head of dill to each jar. Pour the hot brine to fill the jars. Seal and process.

 

Tomato Marmalade

 

This is excellent with any meat. If you mix equal parts of this and hearty mustard it makes a great glaze for roasts.

 

Peel 3 oranges and 2 lemons. Cut the peelings into very fine slivers. Combine with 2 cups water and simmer for 15 minutes. Drain.

 

Remove all pulp from the fruit and add it to the peelings. Blanch and peel 5 ½ pounds of tomatoes and slice.

 

Combine all ingredients in a kettle and mix lightly. Add a spice bag containing 5 cinnamon sticks and 1 tbsp. cloves. Add 6 cups sugar and 1 tsp. salt. Bring to a boil over medium heat and cook until thick and clear. Ladle into sterile jars and seal. Process 15 minutes.

 

Green Tomato Relish
This recipe is a great way to use up green tomatoes when the season is coming to an end.
Clean and cut into manageable pieces 5 pounds of green tomatoes. Pack them into sterile jars and to each jar add 1 clove of garlic, a few slices of onion, 1 whole clove and 3-4 dill heads. Place in a large pan:
1 quart of vinegar
1 quart of water
1/3 cup salt
sugar as desired
Simmer for five minutes then pour into the jars over the tomatoes. Seal and process for 20 minutes. These are really delicious!!!

 

 
 

Eggs Eggs Glorious Eggs!!!

 

Eggs, Eggs glorious Eggs!! If you haven’t had a fresh, local farm egg. You need to do so soon. They are coming in by the dozens (no pun intended), this time of year. The taste alone is worth buying a doz.  from your local farm.  Here are a few amazing facts I like to share with my customers.

*For every one egg you eat from a pastured (farm) hen, you would also have to eat three factory eggs to get the same amount of vitamin E and five for as much vitamin D. All the while, each additional conventional (factory) egg you eat will be giving you one third more cholesterol.

To get the amount of beta-carotene present in one pastured egg, for instance, you would have to eat seven from a factory farm*, according to the 2007 Mother Earth News egg testing project.

They are an ideal form of protein.

They provide a higher combined level of the nine essential amino acids than anything else we eat!

All of this is very important for our health, but the most outstanding quality is the luscious taste. The versatility is endless… meringues, custards, omelettes, mayo….

The culinary feats are endless. All the while encased in its own natural container. 

We were so blessed this year to have our chickens laying all Winter. Finally.. We realised we need to replace the flock each year. (One year they moulted for nearly 5 months)I don’t know about you, but feeding chickens in the cold, for five months with NO EGGS is not my thing. All ready for laying in the Fall, we have our new baby chicks!

I also learned somewhat late if you want a Momma Hen. Buy a Bantam! They will hatch anything. We have such a hen at our farm now. She supplies us and our visitors, with many hours of enjoyment. She is the best mom, teaching them to roost, dig for bugs, dust bathe.. All the while planning her next clutch of babies. To do it all over again. Hence the Name Momma Hen! I waited three years for my Rhode Island Reds to sit. One of our famers shared this titbit of info. Since then it’s been Eggs, Eggs, Glorious Eggs! What to do with all of those eggs! Here is a recipe for all of your eggs, whether you’re own, or a local farm.

              Pickled Eggs

  • 1 (15 ounce) can beets  
  • 1 onion, thinly sliced 
  • 12 hard cooked eggs, shelled and left whole
  • 1/4 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 cup vinegar

1.      Drain liquid from the beets into saucepan. Place beets, onions, and eggs into a large bowl or pitcher.

2.     Pour sugar and vinegar into the saucepan with the beet liquid and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, and let the mixture simmer 15 minutes. 

3.     Pour the beet juice mixture over the beets, eggs, and onions. Seal the bowl or pitcher and refrigerate. Refrigerate for at least one to 3 days; the longer they are allowed to sit the better they will taste.

 

 
 
RSS feed for Zina Right-click, copy link and paste into your newsfeed reader

Calendar


Search


Navigation


Topics


Feeds


BlogRoll