Medicine Woman

  (Waynesville, North Carolina)
dangerous herbs, medicinal herbs, culinary herbs
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More Herbs and Food Combinations part two

 

A while back, I did a blog on spices and what they go well with. This time I will just use the herb and what foods it will enhance. Look through my blogs and you will also see how to make up your own spice blends, such as PUMPKIN PIE SPICE BLEND, SPICED NUTS, SPICY APPLE PIE BLEND, and more. You will find in another blog what spices will enhance what foods.


For those of you that are artistic, this would make a beautiful gift for someone who likes to cook and bake, or is new at cooking and baking. I had a friend who copied something like this by hand in calligraphy, on a long sheet of paper, dyed the paper some pretty color and made colored scroll work all around the edges, and made a small frame all around and made it so that it could be hung on the wall. She also said a few words of friendship and put her name on the bottom and DATED it. It was a very personalized gift. See what you can do!!     (email me for  PDF file and I will gladly send it to you!)


ANISE use in: sweet cream cheese appetizers, soups, fruit salads, applesauce, teas, fruit drinks, carrots, celery, coleslaw, sole, crab, spicy meat mixtures, cakes, cookies, sweet rolls, rye breads



BASIL use in: dips, canapes, all kinds of soups and stews, green salads, especially good on tomatoes, omelets, scrambled eggs, green beans, broccoli, cucumbers, egg plant, peas, spinach, zucchini, shrimp, fish, creole dishes, beef, pork, veal, lamb, all kinds of poultry and stuffing, wine vinegar



BAY use in: bouquet garni, fish chowders, tomato juice and stocks, with poached fish; in hearty fish dishes; and with roast chicken, beef roasts, and beef stew.



BORAGE use in; mild dips, all kinds of soups and stews, green salads, coleslaw, iced drinks, spinach, beets, shellfish, all kinds of meat and poultry and stuffing, cream sauces



BURNET use in: appetizer dips, canapes, cream soups, green salads, potato salad, iced drinks, asparagus, mushrooms, shellfish, tarter sauce, wine vinegar



CARAWAY use in: appetizer spreads and dips, canapes, potato soup, cabbage soups, goulash, coleslaw, potato salad, cream cheese, cottage cheese, cabbage, potatoes, green beans, carrots, red beets, cauliflower, casseroles, German dishes,meatballs, applesauce, cookies, breads,especially rye, apple pie, cakes



CELERY SEED use in: soups, stews, salads, curry dishes, poultry stuffing, fish and meat dishes, eggs, breads, vegetables



CHERVIL use in: potato, spinach and cream soups, in egg and chicken salads, salad dressings and mayonnaise, with fish, shellfish and chicken; in fish sauces and cheese spreads, with lettuce, potatoes, red beets and tomatoes and in a fines herbes combination




CHIVES use in: all kinds of appetizers, all kinds of soups, stews, all kinds of salads, omelets, cheese dishes, deviled eggs, potatoes,carrots, corn, green beans, mushrooms, peas, red beets, summer squash, tomatoes, all kinds of other vegetables, shellfish, broiled fish, all kinds of meat and poultry, tartar sauce, butter sauces,cheese sauces, wine vinegar




CORIANDER use the seeds in curries and pickling spice mixtures; with lentils, lima beans, peas, potato dumplings, in biscuits, breads, lamb dishes; carrot cake and pies.


Use the leaves in: Mexican, Chinese, Indian and Moroccan dishes, in meat, rice and lentil dishes; with corn, zucchini , chicken, and in salads.



CUMIN use in; Mexican, oriental, and Indian and middle eastern dishes, in curries, stews, chili, spicy meat and vegetable dishes; with green beans,cabbage, in deviled eggs; breads and with cheese



DILL use the leaves in:all kinds of appetizers, potato soups,salads and salmon; potato salad, rice dishes and borscht; green salads, coleslaw, cottage cheese, green beans, carrots, cucumbers and potatoes. omelets, cauliflower, tomatoes, halibut, salmon, lamb, ham, cream chicken, tartar sauce, butter sauces, wine vinegar, rye bread


use the seeds in: salad dressings, fish soups, meat dishes, lamb stew,, and egg and potato dishes, cabbage and in breads.



FENNEL use the seeds and leaves with fish; in spicy meat mixtures; with eggs, cabbage, red beets, squash and apples; in stuffings and breads


use Florence fennel as a vegetable; serve raw like celery, braise, bake au gratin or turn into a cream soup.



GARLIC Use with everything except sweets. Use for soups, salads, fish, poultry, meat and egg dishes; in stews, sauces an mayonnaise, in breads and with any vegetables; to make oil and vinegar dressings.



GINGER use fresh ginger in oriental and Indian dishes, with fish, chicken, meats and vegetables


use dried ginger with pot roasts, poultry, carrots, red beets, squash and sweet potatoes; in breads, cakes, cookies, puddings, fruit salads and stewed fruit mixtures.




HORSERADISH use in cocktail and mustard sauces; in sauces for fish, roast beef and in green vegetables; in salad dressings; with boiled meats; in sandwiches and with red beets


LOVAGE Use the leaves and stalks sparingly as a celery substitute in soups, salads, potato salad, stews and stuffings; braise the stalks as a vegetable.

use the seeds in chicken salad, meat loaf, breads and herb butters.





MARJORAM use in: cream cheese dips and appetizers, all kinds of soups and stews, green salads, chicken salad, vegetable cocktails, omelets, scrambled eggs, carrots, spinach, squash,eggplant, cabbage, lima beans, mushrooms, peas, and tomatoes; baked or broiled fish, fish recipes and fish chowders, all kinds of meat, chicken, duck goose, gravies, fish sauces, biscuits, muffins




MINTS use in: green pea soups, split pea soups, fruit salads, teas, iced drinks, , green beans, new peas, baked or broiled fish, lamb, veal, mint sauces, mint jellies, wine vinegar, mint syrups, sherbets




ONION use for all dishes except sweets. Use in soups, stews, salad, egg dishes, fish, poultry, meat and all vegetables, some breads.



OREGANO use in: appetizers spreads, canapes, onion soup, all stews, seafood salads, aspics, omelets, spicy cheese, onions, peas, baked beans, shellfish, all kinds of meats, game, hare, venison, cream sauces, tomato sauces, meat-pie crusts, breads



PARSLEY use in: all kinds of appetizers, all kinds of soups and stews, all kinds of salads, vegetable cocktails, omelets, cheeses, all kinds of vegetables, all kinds of fish and seafood, all kinds of meat, stuffing, tartar sauce, butter sauces, breads, rolls



ROSEMARY use in : cheese appetizers and dips, all kinds of soups ( chicken soup, pea soup) and stews, chicken salads, seafood salads, vegetable juices, omelets, sharp cheese, potatoes, mushrooms, salmon, haddock, cod, all kinds of meats and poultry, wild game, stuffing, gravies, breads, rolls, biscuits



SAGE use in : cheese dips appetizers, cream soups, chowders, sharp cheese, cottage cheese, eggplant, Lima beans, baked or broiled fish, meat loaf, roasts, chicken, turkey, game, stuffing, brown sauce, muffins, breads



SAVORY use in : cheese dips and appetizers, bean soups, chowders, aspics, green salads, vegetable cocktails, deviled eggs, omelets, green beans, sauerkraut, salt water fish, all kinds of meat, chicken, duck,, turkey, fish sauces, cream sauce, meat-pie crusts



TARRAGON use in: all kinds of appetizers, chicken soup, mushroom soup, all kinds of salads, vegetable cocktails, omelets, cream cheese, asparagus, all fish, steaks, chicken, duck turkey, cream sauce, Hollandaise



THYME use in : shrimp dips, vegetable soup and stews, all other types of stews, tomato aspic, lemon tea, cottage cheese, cream cheese, beans, onions, potatoes, all kinds of fish, roasts, meat loaf, ham, stuffing, turkey, all tomato sauces, breads, rolls.



TURMERIC use as a cheap saffron substitute for its bright yellow color. Good in curries, salads, dressings and mustard; with seafood, fish, poultry and meat; in rice dishes; and with eggs



WATERCRESS use liberally in salads, chicken salad, bean salad, potato salad, and coleslaw; in tomato juice, soups and egg dishes; with cottage cheese; and in herb butters.

 
 

More Herbs and Food Combinations

 

Here are some more herbs AND spices that go good with certain foods.

ENJOY!


For those of you that are artistic, this would make a beautiful gift for someone who likes to cook and bake, or is new at cooking and baking. I had a friend who copied something like this by hand in calligraphy, on a long sheet of paper, dyed the paper some pretty color and made colored scroll work all around the edges, and made a small frame all around and made it so that it could be hung on the wall. She also said a few words of friendship and put her name on the bottom and DATED it. It was a very personalized gift. See what you can do!!



BEANS, DRIED


cumin, garlic, onions, parsley, sage, savory, thyme


BEANS, GREEN


basil, cloves, dill, marjoram, mints, savory, thyme


BEEF


basil, bay leaf, chili pepper, cumin, garlic, ginger, marjoram, onions, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme


BREAD


anise, basil, caraway, cardamom, cinnamon, coriander, cumin, dill, garlic, onions, oregano, parsley, poppy seeds, rosemary, sage, sesame seeds, thyme


BROCCOLI


basil, dill, garlic, nutmeg, oregano


CABBAGE


basil, caraway, cayenne pepper, dill, marjoram, savory


CARROTS


basil, chervil, chives, cinnamon, cloves, cumin, dill, ginger, marjoram, mint, parsley, savory


CAULIFLOWER


basil, cumin, dill, garlic, marjoram, parsley, rosemary, savory, tarragon


CHEESE


basil, chervil, chives, coriander, curry powder, dill, garlic, marjoram, parsley, sage, tarragon, thyme


CHICKEN


allspice, basil, bay leaf, cinnamon, curry powder, dill, garlic, ginger, mace, marjoram, nutmeg, onions, paprika, parsley, rosemary,, saffron, sage, savory, thyme


COTTAGE CHEESE

basil, chives, cinnamon, curry powder, dill, paprika, thyme


EGGPLANT


basil, cinnamon, garlic, marjoram, onions, oregano, parsley, savory, thyme


EGGS


basil, chervil, chives, coriander, curry powder, dill, fennel, marjoram, oregano, paprika, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme


FISH


basil, chives, curry powder, dill, garlic, ginger, marjoram, oregano, parley, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme


FRUIT


anise, cinnamon . Cloves, ginger, mace, mints, nutmeg, rosemary


LAMB


basil, bay leaf, cinnamon, coriander, cumin, curry powder, dill, garlic, ginger, mints, onions, parsley, rosemary, tarragon, thyme


MUSHROOMS


coriander, marjoram, oregano, tarragon, thyme


PARSNIPS


basil, curry powder, dill, marjoram, parsley, thyme


POTAOTES


caraway, chives, dill, marjoram, oregano, paprika, parsley, rosemary, tarragon, thyme


SALADS, GREEN


basil, chervil chives, coriander, dill, garlic, marjoram,, mints, oregano, parsley, rosemary, tarragon, thyme



SOUPS


basil, bay leaf, chives, dill, garlic, marjoram, onions, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, thyme



SPINACH


allspice, basil,, chives, nutmeg, rosemary


SQUASH


allspice, basil, cinnamon, cloves, dill, marjoram, nutmeg, rosemary, savory


STUFFINGS


garlic, marjoram, parsley, onions, rosemary, sage, thyme


TOMATOES


basil, bay leaf, chives, garlic, oregano, parsley, rosemary, savory, tarragon, thyme


TURKEY


basil, garlic, marjoram, onions, rosemary, saffron , sage, savory, tarragon, thyme


VEAL


basil, bay leaf, chervil, marjoram, onions, parsley, rosemary, savory, thyme




I'll be doing another blog starting with the herb or spice and what goes good with it.

 
 

OAT PANCAKES ANYONE??

 

Now that winter is upon most of us, many of us might feel like spending more time in the kitchen making food from scratch. I get real tired , real fast, of the ho hum pancake recipes I see in the cookbooks and found this one years ago. I tried it and thought it had a lot more going for it than most pancakes do. Sooo, thought you might like to try it as well. ENJOY!


OAT PANCAKES


1 ¼ cup rolled oats

¾ cup white flour, sifted

½ cup whole wheat flour (I sift mine)

1 tbls baking powder

2 slightly beaten eggs

2 ¼ cups buttermilk

2 tbls oil

2 tbls honey

1 teas vanilla

MAPEL PEAR SAUCE (recipe to follow)


In a large bowl combine the oats, flours, baking powder. Make a well in the center of the mixture; set aside.


In a medium bowl combine the eggs, buttermilk, oil, honey and vanilla. Add to the flour mixture


Stir just til moistened. Cover batter, allow to stand at room temperature for 15 to 20 minutes.



MEANWHILE: make the MAPLE PEAR SAUCE


Peel and core 4 LARGE PEARS; cut pears into ¼ inch slices. Toss with 1 tablespoon LEMON JUICE; set aside.


In a large heavy saucepan, combine ½ cup APPLE JUICE, ½ cup MAPLE SYRUP; 3 inches of STICK CINNAMON.


Bring to boiling. Add PEAR SLICES; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, for 3 to 5 minutes or til pears are tender.


Stir together 2 tablespoon APPLE JUICE AND 1 tablespoon CORNSTARCH;


stir into pear mixture along with ¼ cup CRANBERRIES.


Cook and stir til bubbly.


Cook and stir for 2 more minutes.


Remove from heat; but keep warm. Discard cinnamon.


Makes about 2 ½ cups sauce


Then continue with making pancakes;


Stir the batter a little. Heat your pan that you are using to make the pancakes in. Pour just a little oil to cover the bottom of the pan and add your batter, the way you normally do to make pancakes.


When pancakes are done, serve and pass the sauce for individual use.


This recipe should make about 16 pancakes.






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I thought I might share with you some info on FISH and SHELLFISH that I have collected through the years...

 




FISH AND SHELLFISH INFO



COD Atlantic cod and Pacific cod have lean, firm white flesh.


FISH THAT MAY BE SUBSTITUTED: haddock, whiting (silver hake), pollock

halibut; scrod


HALIBUT INTERCHANGEABLE WITH petrale sole; pompano; swordfish; cod


FLATFISH flounders and halibuts. Some flatfish are called sole.

Flatfish have lean, delicately flavored white flesh.


FISH THAT MAY BE SUBSTITUTED: summer flounder (fluke); yellowtail flounder;

petrale, lemon, gray and rex soles; halibut; turbot


MACKEREL a/k/a BONITO, WAHOO. Mackerel has both dark and light fatty

flesh. King mackerel is stronger flavored and fattier than Spanish mackerel.


FISH THAT MAY BE SUBSTITUTED: wahoo; bullet, chub, king, spanish macerels;

tunas; mullet


GOOSEFISH a/k/a MONKFISH OR ANGLER FISH. Has firm, white flesh that

tastes like lobster. With goosefish only the tail section is edible.


FISH THAT MAY BE SUBSTITUTED: cusk


RED SNAPPER Flavorful, lean, juicy white flesh.


FISH THAT MAY BE SUBSTITUTED: other varieties of snapper on the Pacific

Coast, or rock fishes


SALMON A/K/A PINK, CHUM, SOCKEYE AND ATLANTIC SALMONS have fatty, distinctive-flavored firm flesh that ranges in color from white to deep coral.


THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR SALMON.


SEA BASS Lean, firm, white flesh.


FISH THAT MAY BE SUBSTITUTED: black sea bass; sand perch; groupers; scamp;

sand bass; striped bass. INTERCHANGEABLE WITH: tuna; halibut; salmon;

haddock ; sea trout


SHARK a/k/a MAKO It has texture, color and taste similar to those of

swordfish. INTERCHANGEABLE W/ bluefin tuna, albacore, swordfish, catfish


FISH THAT MAY BE SUBSTITUTED: porbeagle; blue sharks


SWORDFISH Coarse-textured, rich, delicately flavored.


FISH THAT MAY BE SUBSTITUTED: mako; shark



TROUT A/K/A BROOK, RAINBOW; HATCHERY-BRED. Light meat, firm flesh, moderately fatty. INTERCHANGEABLE WITH red snapper; bluefish; perch


FISH THAT MAY BE SUBSTIUTED OR INTERCHANGED: brook, rainbow, hatchery bred


TUNA Several varieties. All have fatty, full flavored, light or dark flesh.


FISH THAT MAY BE SUBSTITUTED: bonito; mackerels





SHELLFISH


CRAB A/K/A HARD SHELL CRABS; BLUE, ROCK, DUNGENESS. Meat is delicate and moderately sweet.

Available live, fresh, frozen or cooked




LOBSTER Firm, rich tasting, non fatty succulent flesh

Available whole, live, cooked or frozen



SHRIMP AND PRAWNS (JUMBO SHRIMP) Delicate, firm flesh

Available fresh, cooked, frozen, whole, in shell or shelled



CLAMS HARD SHELL; LITTLENECK; CHERRYSTONE, CHOWDER CLAMS. Tender, sweet flesh

AVAILABLE whole or shucked, fresh or frozen



MUSSELS Mollusks Tender, sweet flesh

Available live



OYSTERS tender flesh, with delicate flavor.

Available year round, whole or shucked, fresh or frozen


SCALLOPS Bay and Sea. Both are tender, with delicately flavored ivory flesh.

AVAILABLE shucked, fresh or frozen


SQUID delicately flavored, firm (almost chewy) white flesh

Available whole or cut into pieces fresh or frozen





OTHER INTERESTING INFO


With a delicate texture fish when grilling with a perforated grill rack,

use disposable aluminum pans, the Nordic ware fish boat or heavy aluminum

foil so that the delicate fish dose not flake and fall between the grill

grates onto the fire.

 


 

FRESH WATER FISH PRESERVATIVE


This is a good way to preserve your fish if you cannot eat the fish right away. Even if you have to freeze them.


1/4 cup lemon juice

1 3/4 cup water

one 1 oz pkg unflavored gelatin

whole trout, gutted and cleaned


in small saucepan, combine lemon juice & water. Remove 1/2 cup

of the mixture and set aside. Bring the remaining lemon juice

mixture in the saucepan to boil. Sprinkle gelatin over the reserved

1/2 cup of lemon water til it softens. When gelatin has softened,

whisk it into the boiling lemon juice mixture & remove from heat.

Whisk til gelatin has dissolved & set saucepan aside to cool.

Dip each cleaned fish into lemon juice/gelatin mixture, then wrap

individually in plastic wrap & place in resealable plastic bags and freeze.


Whole trout treated in this way can be frozen for up to a year

 



REGARDING FISH


SPECIAL NOTE: To test doneness ; carefully slide a sharp paring knife between the layers of the fish meat, then turn it slightly to get a good look inside. If the meat still looks translucent in the middle, give it another minute or two. You DON'T want the fish to flake, it will be tough, dry and chewy. When you do the knife test, press on it w/your finger & make a mental note of how firm it is. That's the firmness you want next

time. Use a timer, and then you won't ever have to do it w/the knife again!







 
 

WHAT HERBS GO WITH WHAT FOODS??

 


I thought that I might like to share with you some herb ideas that go with foods. I keep a paper in my spice and herb drawer to match foods with. Maybe some of you might enjoy a list to look quickly at to see what herbs you can use to go with what foods your preparing:


                                                              MEATS

 

CHICKEN                  anise,   basil, bay leaf, chives,  cinnamon, cumin, dill, fenugreek, garlic, ginger, marjoram, onion, oregano, parsley, rosemary, saffron, sage,  tarragon, thyme

 

TURKEY                       basil, garlic, marjoram, onion, oregano, parsley, rosemary, saffron, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme

 

DUCK                        chervil, ginger, thyme,

 

 

BEEF                basil, bay, caraway, cumin, fenugreek, garlic, ginger, marjoram, onion, oregano, parsley,    rosemary, sage, savory, shallot, tarragon,   thyme

 

HAMBURGER           cayenne pepper, oregano, paprika, thyme

 

STEAK                        chives, garlic, rosemary, thyme

 

LAMB                       basil, bay, cinnamon, coriander, cumin, dill, garlic, lemon balm, mint, marjoram,  onion, parsley, rosemary, saffron, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme

 

HAM                           cinnamon, ginger, sage

 

PORK                    anise, basil, bay, caraway, cardamom, coriander, cumin, dill, fennel, garlic, ginger, oregano, rosemary, saffron sage,   tarragon, thyme

 

 

                                                       EGGS

 

             Anise, basil, caraway, cayenne pepper, chervil, chives, coriander,  dill, fennel, marjoram, oregano, parsley, rosemary, saffron, sage,  savory, shallot, sorrel, tarragon, thyme

 

FRITTATAS         black pepper, rosemary, thyme,

 

OMELETS:       chervil,   oregano,   parsley,

 

 

   QUICHES            basil, dill, marjoram,

         

    SOUFFLES        basil, cayenne, chives

 

 

 

                                                                         RICE

Basil, fennel, lovage, saffron, tarragon, thyme

 

 

 

 

CHEESE

 

                   basil, caraway, chervil, chives, cumin seed, dill, lovage, marjoram, mints, parsley, poppy seeds, sage, savory, sesame seed, shallot, tarragon, thyme

 

 

SOUPS   

 

 

                  basil, bay, calendula, caraway, chervil, chives, cumin, dill , fennel, lovage, marjoram, mints, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, sorrel, tarragon, thyme, lemon thyme

 

 

VEGETABLES   :

   

  ASPARAGUS:          chives, lemon balm, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme,

   

 FRESH BEANS:         basil, caraway, cloves, dill, marjoram, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory, thyme

   

  BROCCOLI :             basil, curry powder, dill, garlic, lemon balm, marjoram, oregano, tarragon,  thyme

  

CARROTS:             anise, basil, chervil, chives, cinnamon, cloves, cumin, dill, ginger, marjoram, mint, parsley, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme

 

CAULIFLOWER:     basil, caraway, chives, cumin, curry powder, dill, garlic, marjoram, parsley, rosemary, savory, tarragon

 

EGGPLANT:             basil, cinnamon,   curry powder,   dill, garlic, marjoram, mint, onion,   oregano, parsley, sage, savory, rosemary, thyme 

 

MUSHROOMS          black pepper, coriander, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, tarragon, thyme

 

ONION:                     chives, rosemary, sage, savory

 

PARSNIPS               basil, dill, marjoram, parsley, savory, thyme

 

PEAS                           basil, caraway, chervil, chives, mint, rosemary, savory, tarragon, thyme

 

POTATOES                 basil, caraway, chives, coriander, dill, fennel, garlic, lovage, marjoram, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, tarragon, thyme

 

SPINACH                   anise, basil, black pepper, caraway seed,  chervil, chives, cinnamon, dill, garlic, parsley , rosemary, thyme  ,

 

SQUASH           basil, caraway, cardamom, clove, ginger, marjoram, dill, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory

 

 

TOMATOES                basil, bay leaf, black pepper, chives, coriander, dill,  garlic, lovage, marjoram, oregano, parsley,  rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme

 

ZUCCHINI                 basil, dill, tarragon, thyme

 

 

 

SAUCES AND SUCH:

 

MAYONNAISE          basil, curry powder, parsley, tarragon

 

HOLLANDAISE       cayenne, paprika

 

COCKTAIL               celery seeds, chives, parsley

 

CHEESE        cayenne, curry powder, dry mustard, paprika

 

 BUTTER        basil, chives, oregano, tarragon, thyme

 

BEARNAISE      chervil, parsley, tarragon

 

BARBECUE       cayenne, chili powder, cumin, paprika

 

 

 

FISH:  

 

TROUT               basil, chives, rosemary, sage, tarragon

 

SHRIMP             cayenne, garlic, parsley, oregano

 

SHELLFISH      black pepper, chives, garlic, and thyme

 

SALMON         chervil, dill, parsley

 

LOBSTER           parsley, tarragon, thyme

 

CRAB MEAT      chives, marjoram

 

COD             parsley, tarragon, thyme

 

 

                                                             GAME: 

 

DUCK                chervil, cinnamon, coriander    cumin seeds,   dill weed, fennel seeds, ginger,   juniper berries, lemon zest, marjoram, paprika, rosemary, saffron, sage, tarragon, thyme,    turmeric

 

GOOSE                    aniseed,   bay leaf, caraway seeds, cinnamon, cayenne, coriander, garlic, ginger,  juniper berries, lemon zest,  minced meat, onion, sage,  thyme

 

 

PHEASANT         bay leaf, cayenne, cloves, garlic, juniper berries, leeks, lemon grass, onion,     black and white and green peppercorns,       paprika,    rosemary, sage, thyme

 

GROUSE                mushrooms, nutmeg, shallots, thyme,

 

PARTRIDGE/ QUAIL:    bay leaf, cardamoms, cinnamon, chili peppers,   cayenne pepper, coriander,  cumin,  garlic, garam masala,  ginger, lemon zest,  mint, nutmeg, onion,  parsley, ground saffron,  sage,   thyme

 

DEER          allspice ,  cardamom,  ground cumin,  cinnamon, cayenne pepper, cloves, chili powder,  coriander leaves,  dill,    garlic,    ginger,    juniper berries, lemon,  nutmeg, onion,   oregano,   parsley,  rosemary, star anise, thyme,

 

WILD BOAR           cayenne pepper, coriander leaves, cloves, cinnamon, garlic,      ginger, juniper berries,      lemon, onion,   red chills, rosemary, tarragon, 

 

RABBIT/HARE          bouquet garni (parsley, bay leaf, celery leaves, marjoram, lemon zest),    cinnamon, cloves, garlic, ginger, juniper berries, nutmeg,   onion,   parsley, rosemary, saffron, tarragon,  thyme 

                                  


 

 

 
 

QUEEN OF THE MEADOW, QUEEN OF THE PRAIRIE, MEADOW SWEET AND OH MY!

 

I see a lot on the web where Queen of the Meadow is being used interchangeably with Meadow Sweet. Even some of my herb books do this. For instance the famous Mrs. Grieves in A Modern Herbal does not appear to distinguish one from the other. There are many wanna be herbalist, but are not willing to do their homework before selling their products, and also not taking herbalism as seriously as they should. They just want to make that sale. Here is where knowing the Latin word comes in handy and helps us so that we don't make a serious mistake either on our own or when we purchase a certain herb from another herbalist.


In this blog, I'm going to give

the name of the herb,

it's Latin name and Family,

a list of other names the herb is known as;

a description of what the plant looks like,

what the leaves look like

what the flowers look like.

Also, I will give the growing situation that each plant thrives in,

and finally what each herb is used for.


The herbs are : QUEEN OF THE MEADOW; BONESET; MEADOW SWEET AND QUEEN OF THE PRAIRIES.





QUEEN OF THE MEADOW Latin name is Eupatorium Purpureum of the Aster Family

Queen of the Meadow is also known as Joe Pye weed, Gravel Root; Trumpet Weed and Purple Boneset.


QUEEN OF THE MEADOW grows to 7 feet tall, very graceful. The stem is rigid, generally hollow, tinged with purple above the nodes, bearing oblong lanceolate vanilla scented, roughish leaves, in whorls of 2 -5 leaves about 10 inches long. Flowers are pinkish purple, can be creamy white, but all I've ever seen here in North Carolina is pinkish purple. The flowers are arranged in clusters of 5 to 10 on very numerous dense terminal compound cormbs. Appearing late summer to mid autumn. Prefers rich calcerous woodland soils, either dry or moist.


QUEEN OF THE MEADOW use mainly the root and is used for tonic, stimulant, antilithic, renal or urinary calculi, gout and rheumatism. You drink this cold and one mouthful at a time and 1 cup during the entire day. Do not take this as a regular drink. Take one cup of tea only every two or three days and only for one week at a time, with about 3 weeks in between before taking another cup of tea. This is a very strong herb.

The flowers are used as a diuretic and tonic.  The leaves help repel insects such as  mosquitos and other flying insects. One could  use the leaves mixed in candle wax to make an insect repellant candle for outdoor use.

BONESET Latin name is Eupatorium perfoliatum L compositae notice the difference, Perfoliatum is not the same as Purpureum. They are close relatives and share similar chemical constituents.


BONESET grows to 4 feet tall and has a pubescent stem which is stout and cylindrical, branched above, bearing lanceolate leaves united at the base around the stem; dark and shiny green above, cotton like beneath and fine toothed. Inflorescence of 10-16 small white or rarely, blue flowers on a dense corymbose cyme.( a flat topped cluster of flowers with the flower stalks proportionately longer lower down the stem. An inflorescence in which the primary axis bears a single terminal flower that develops first, the system being continued by the axes of secondary and higher orders each with a flower.)Appears in late summer to mid autumn; prefers open, marshy regions.


BONESET: use the flowers and is used for colds and fevers, and is taken as a hot infusion.



MEADOWSWEET Latin name is Filipendula ulmaria Meadow sweet leaves are compound with toothed leaflets that are green above, woolly white below. Stalks 4 -6 ft tall are topped with fluffy clusters of sweetly fragrant white flowers. Meadow sweet needs a damp, rich soil in partial shade in order grow well.


MEADOW SWEET is used for treating colds, dyspepsia, flatulence, indigestion, sore throat, It is from Meadow sweet that that salicylic acid was first discovered in 1839 and from which Aspirin was later synthesized. Meadow sweet is also used to reduce inflammation and to relieve cold and flu symptoms, including fever and pain.


QUEEN OF THE PRAIRES (Fillipendula rubra is of the Rose , Rosaceae family) The foliage is dark green pinnately compound leaves with jagged leaflets. Grows to a height of 6 to 8 feet. The flowers are fluffy clusters of pink, like pink cotton candy. Blooms for weeks in July or August. Prefers moist soil , likes full or part sun, prefers fertile, organic soil and steady moisture. Will not grow well in dry soil.

Part used is the roots as an astringent to stop bleeding, diarrhea or dysentery. Leaf is used as an antacid.



Notice the difference in 1) height 2) stem 3) the way the leaves are and look 5) the color of the flowers and 6) one has a single flower and the other has clusters of flowers



 
 

MORE ON SPICES

 

Would you like to make some of your own spice blends from your own kitchen? Here are a few that I blend in my kitchen and I've included a few recipes or what to do with the spice blends.  All the blends are easy to use.  I store the spice mixtures in a small baby food jar or a 4 oz jam/jelly jar with lids.


ENJOY!



PUMPLIN PIE SPICE BLEND


2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

2 teaspoons ground ginger

1 teaspoons ground cloves

1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 teaspoons ground allspice


yield: about ½ cup


mix to blend and store in a small jar away from heat and in a cool spot.


RECIPE TO GO WITH THE ABOVE!


SPICED NUTS


one 8 ounce jar of dry roasted peanuts

½ cup pecans

½ cup walnut halves

1 egg, lightly beaten

1 teaspoon water

½ cup sugar

1 tablespoon PUMPKIN PIE SPICE BLEND

¾ teaspoon of sea salt (if you have it, otherwise just use regular or none, if you prefer)


Combine the nuts. Mix together the egg and water, and toss with the nut mixture. Combine the sugar, PUMPKIN PIE SPICE BLEND, and salt, and toss that with the nuts until they are well coated. Spread nuts in a single layer on a lightly greased cookie sheet. Bake at 300 for 20-25 minutes. Break up any large clusters and allow to cool.


This can make a great gift! Simply put the SPICED NUTS in a decorative jar and add ribbon, cards, or other ideas.





SPICY APPLE PIE BLEND


2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

1 tablespoon lemon zest

1 tablespoon ground cloves

1 ½ teaspoons ground ginger

1 ½ teaspoons ground nutmeg


simply mix the ingredients and use 1 teaspoon of SPICY APPLE PIE BLEND per 6 cups of thinly sliced tart apples.


FOR STREUSEL TOPPED MUFFINS:

combine together:

1 /4 cup firmly packed brown sugar

2 tablespoons softened butter

1 tablespoon flour

½ teaspoon SPICY APPLE PIE BLEND


Sprinkle over muffin batter in baking pan and bake as directed.


This is a tasty treat for plain muffins, applesauce muffins, pumpkin muffins, or apple cinnamon muffins




PICKLING SPICE BLEND

INGREDIENTS:

2 tablespoons mustard seed
1 tablespoon whole allspice
2 teaspoons black peppercorns
2 teaspoons whole cloves
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon hot red pepper flakes
2 small bay leaves, broken up
2 inch piece of cinnamon stick, cracked in small pieces
1 teaspoon cardamom


Mix ingredients together and store in an airtight container.





SPICED SUGAR

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup granulated sugar
1 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon allspice

Combine all ingredients in small bowl and toss with fork or spoon to blend thoroughly. Pour into storage container, cover tightly and store in a cool place. Keeps indefinitely.

Use in hot or cold tea, coffee or chocolate. Sprinkle on plain cakes, ice cream or fruit.



IRANIAN SPICE MIX

INGREDIENTS:

2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon ground coriander
1 tablespoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg, more as desired
1 pinch ground cinnamon

Mix together well. Store in dark glass bottle.

This is great with rice, grilled veggies or veggie stews




LATIN SPICE BLEND

INGREDIENTS:

2 tablespoons dry mustard
2 tablespoons grated orange peel, dried
1 1/2 tablespoon allspice
1 1/2 tablespoon nutmeg
1 1/2 tablespoon ginger
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 teaspoons cayenne pepper

Blend all ingredients. Use to season beef, pork or vegetable dishes.







SPICY JAMAICAN BLEND

6 tablespoons ground allspice

3 teaspoons ground black pepper

1 ½ teaspoons ground nutmeg

1 ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon lemon zest

mix thoroughly.

Yields ½ cup



    To make rub:

    combine 2 ¾ tablespoons of the SPICY JAMAICAN BLEND

    with 1 Jalapeno pepper, cored, seeded and chopped,

    1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger,

    2 cloves garlic (crushed) and

    2 tablespoons vegetable oil.

    Mix all ingredients well, and rub onto fish, beef., lamb, or pork.

    Grill until done.

    Jalapeno pepper may be increased or decreased according to taste.





ALL ROUND SWEET SPICY BLEND

1 tablespoon orange zest

1 tablespoon ground nutmeg

1 tables ground cloves

1 tables ground ginger

2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

mix thoroughly yield: about 1/3 cup



Suggestions for use:

stir ALL ROUND SWEET SPICY BLEND into ice cream,yogurt, fruit, oatmeal

Add 2 to 3 tablespoons to cake or quick bread batters for a spicy flavor.



MIXED SPICE BLEND

6 teaspoons ground coriander

5 teaspoons ground cinnamon

4 teaspoons ground allspice

2 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon ground cloves

Mix all spices thoroughly and keep in airtight container away from heat.

In fact, you could add a whole vanilla bean that's been slit so that the flavors blend smoothly

Use this MIXED SPICE BLEND the next time you make apple cake. It's great!

Use this SPICE BLEND whenever a recipe calls for mixed spices for apple pie, fruit cake, baked fruits, spice cookies, tea breads. Yields about ½ cup



OLD TIMEY CIDER SPICE

2 cinnamon sticks

12 whole cloves

7 whole allspice berries

2 star anise

1 tablespoon orange zest

to make the cider spice, add the spices to 1 quart of sweet cider. Bring to a boil in a glass, stainless, enamel pan. Strain, serve hot, garnish with orange slices.

Serves 5





HOT CHOCOLATE.. A DIFFERENT WAY

½ cup sugar

1 tablespoon flour

¼ cup cocoa

¼ teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

¾ teaspoon ground cloves

1/8 teaspoon ground allspice

blend all ingredients thoroughly. Yield ¾ cup enough to make 6 servings

To make the hot chocolate: add ¾ mix to 2 cups water and simmer for 4 minutes. Stir in 6 cups milk and reheat. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla, whip, and serve



 
 

LET'S USE SPICES!!

 



Here's a handy list in alphabetical order; of spices and what to use them in. Incidentally; always keep your spices as cool (but not refrigerated) as possible.


ALLSPICE WHOLE allspice is used in Caribbean soups;as well as other types of soups; stews; pot roasts; sauerbraten; marinades; and in pouching, boiling or steaming fish or shellfish; savory sauces; pickled beets; pickles; preserves; stewed fruit; beverages


GROUND ALLSPICE is used in sweet breads; chutneys; curries; spice cakes; puddings; plum pudding; mincemeat; fruit desserts; fruit pies; cookies; candy; frosting; meat loaf; pot roast; chili sauce; ketchup; tomato sauce; spaghetti sauce; barbecue sauce; French dressing; soups; pickled eggs; sweet potatoes and squash.


SUGGESTIONS:

GROUND;

1/8 to ¼ teaspoons in 2 cups sweet potatoes.

1 teaspoon in 1 ½ to 2 cups graham cracker crumbs for pie crust.

½ teaspoon to 1 inch thick slice ham

1/8 teaspoon to 1 pound ground beef


WHOLE:

3 for every 3 cups of pea soup

4 to 6 for each 2 pounds of fish when poaching





ANISE SEEDS For culinary purposes anise seed has wide ranging applications. It is popular in many European confections. The French like it with carrots. Anise is frequently used in Scandinavian breads; East Indian curries; and Hispanic stews. The seed enhances cooked fruit dishes; eggs and cheese; spinach and many baked goods. Cinnamon and bay leaves complement the taste of anise.


For the best flavor buy whole seeds and crush them just before using. If you don't have a spice grinder this can be accomplished with a mortar and pestle, or you might break them with a rolling pin.


Anise whole or crushed may be used in cakes; cookies; candy; applesauce; fruit pies;

fruit salads; stewed fruits; salad dressings; appetizers; baked apples; sweet breads; as well as rye breads; biscuits and confectionery; pickles; sausage; cheese; beef stew; seafood; chowders; and beverages.


Anise is used in much the same way as fennel to flavor fish; poultry; soups and root vegetable dishes. Numerous alcoholic drinks and cordials are flavored with aniseed; particularly French pastis; Pernod and Ricard; Greek ouzo; Spanish ojen; Turkish raki; Italian anesone; Arab arrak and Egyptian kibib.






SUGGESTIONS:

½ to 1 teaspoons ; crushed in baked or stewed applesauce

1/4 to ½ teaspoons ; crushed; in 2 tablespoons butter for basting one pound of fish

¼ to ½ teaspoon in 8 oz package of cream cheese for spread for canapes




CARDAMOM SEEDS can be bought ground or in the pod; to use; break the pods to free the seeds; then crush the seeds.


Cardamom is a principal spice in Danish pastry. Also use in coffee cakes; sweet breads; flat breads; fruit salad dressings; fruit salads; fruit pies; fruit soups; curry powder; curry dishes; cookies; cakes; gingerbread; pickles; pickling spice; custards; puddings; rice pudding ; sweet potatoes; squash; baked beans; barbecue sauce; honey chutneys; grape jelly; hot spiced wines and punch.


SUGGETIONS:

GROUND:

¼ teaspoon in blueberry muffin mix

1/8 teaspoon to 4 cups crushed strawberry, peaches or raspberries

1/8 teaspoon to egg whites for meringue

1/8 teaspoon to 2 cups baked beans


WHOLE

2 to 4 cardamoms to a 4 pound roast for sauerbraten

2 to 3 cardamoms in 1 quart of mulled wine

4 to 6 cardamoms in 6 cups Glogg

6 to 8 cardamoms in 2 gallons of fruit punch



CINNAMON Whole cinnamon is used in fruit compotes; stewed prunes; apricots and other dried fruits; apple dishes; hot chocolate; mulled wine and as stirrers for beverages.


Ground cinnamon is used in preparing cinnamon toast; sweet breads; plum pudding; cakes; muffins; fruit cake; spice cake; apple pie; apple dumplings; apple sauce; apple butter; baked apples; fruit salads; puddings; custards; ice cream; doughnuts; cinnamon rolls; jams; preserves; spiced nuts; chocolate fudge; sweet potatoes; squash; pumpkin soups and pies; winter squash dishes; meat soups; poultry rub; pilafs; curries; ham glaze; ham; pork; lamb roast; lamb or beef stews; creamed chicken; fruit punches; Sprinkle over cakes; cookies; hot cereals; eggnog; milk shakes; custards; broiled grapefruit bread and tapioca puddings.











CLOVES

Whole cloves are used to stud ham; fruit; fruit peels; onions or glazed pork or beef. Also used in Pot roast; marinades; pickling; soups; spiced tongue and to make pomander balls


Ground cloves is used in sweet breads; muffins; spice cakes; fruit cakes; gingerbread; frosting; plum pudding cookies; breads; fruit salads; cooked fruit; spiced nuts; meringues; mincemeat; fruit pies; pickling; ketchup; chili sauce; beef stew; pot roast; Indian curries and chutneys; rice dishes; sweet potatoes; squash; green vegetables; tomatoes; glazes; winter squash soups and purees; mulled drinks.


SUGGESTIONS:


GROUND:

1/8 to ¼ teaspoons to 4 cups rhubarb

¾ teaspoon to 6 pound pork roast

¼ teaspoon in mincemeat or fruit pies

½ to 1 teaspoon in recipe yielding 12 to 14 pounds fruit cake


WHOLE:

4 to 12 when cooking 1 cup rice

1/ to 2 for each cup hot or iced tea or mulled wine

6 to 8 in marinade for 4 pounds meat




GINGER


The Whole GINGER is used in pickling; syrups; beverages; marinades; stewed fruit; teriyaki sauce; preserves; teas and ginger beer.


GROUND GINGER is used in pumpkin pie;cakes; gingerbread; bread; ginger toast; cookies; fruits: steamed baked or stewed fruits; fruit pies and salads; salad dressings; puddings; custards; whipped cream; pickles; chutney; conserves; curries; iced cream; appetizers; rice; soups; chicken and other poultry;Oriental dishes; lamb; pork; beef; veal; venison; fish; nearly all vegetables; sweet potatoes; carrots;and punch

 

Works well with other spices.


SUGGESTIONS:

¼ to 2 teaspoons for 1 ½ pounds pork

¼ teaspoons to 2 cups sliced carrots

¼ teaspoon to 3 cups mixed fruit

¼ to 1 teaspoon to 2 cups sweet potatoes

¼ teaspoons to bread puddings and rice

1/8 to ¼ teaspoons to 2 egg whites for meringues







MACE sauces for vegetables; puddings; cakes; muffins; sweet breads; and fruity desserts. Mace is the outer covering of the nutmeg seed.

Mace and Nutmeg are the only two spices found naturally on the same plant.


Mace has a variety of uses and can be substituted for Nutmeg in recipes.


Use Mace in preparing pound cake spice cake; devil's food cake; gingerbread; doughnuts; coffee cakes; danish pastries; frosting;chiffon custard or refrigerator pies; breads; puddings; custards; fruit; apple dishes; waffles; pancakes; muffins;cream cheese spreads for fruit and nut breads; candy; vegetable; fruit salads; fruit salad dressings; glazes; soups; pork; beef ;lamb; chicken fish sauces; hot chocolate; punches


SUGGESTIONS:

¼ teaspoon in stewing 2 cups dried apricots

1 teaspoon in 2 cups waffle mix or recipe using 2 cups flour

1/8 teaspoon in 4 cups creamed chicken or tuna

1/8 teaspoon in 2 cups white sauce

1/8 to ¼ teaspoon in a pound cake recipe or mix






NUTMEG


Ground Nutmeg or the freshly grated whole Nutmeg may be sprinkled over hot and cold milk drinks; eggnog; fruits; fruit salads ; puddings; vegetable and broccoli soups; and used to season meats; poultry; sea food; vegetables and sauces.


Also use in cakes; cookies; doughnuts; pies; pastries; sweet breads; muffins; waffles; pancakes and coffee cake; rice dishes and poultry marinades.


SUGGESTIONS:

½ to 1 teaspoon for two crust pastry

¼ teaspoon in 2 cups spinach; mixed veggies; sliced carrots

1/8 to ¾ teaspoon in vanilla pudding mix or recipe using 2 cups milk

¼ teaspoon in about 2 cups batter for muffins; coffee cakes and waffles.

½ teas in chocolate frosting for 2 cake layers

1/8 to ¼ teaspoon in 1 cup heavy cream; whipped or 1 cup powdered sugar for a glaze

1/8 teaspoon in 4 cups creamed chicken or tuna

1/8 teaspoon for 1 pound beef


one whole Nutmeg; grated; equals 2 to 3 teaspoons ground Nutmeg.






STAR ANISE Chinese dishes; teas; and baked goods; an ingredient in Chinese five spice powder.

star anise and aniseed (or anise) are not related botanically.

Star anise plays a key role in the slow cooked dishes that characterize Eastern Chinese cuisine. Its licorice flavor enhances red cooked dishes; as well as eggs simmered in black tea.



One of the fundamental components of Chinese five-spice powder; star anise is popular in Chinese "red cooking"; where meat (often beef or pork) is turned a deep red-brown color by being braised in a dark soy sauce flavored broth. It's equally delicious in roasted duck or risotto; peach crumble or pea soup; iced tea or ice cream; cookies or chai.

 

Star anise is used in the East as aniseed is in the West. Apart from its use in sweetmeats and confectionery; where sweeteners must be added, it contributes to meat and poultry dishes, combining especially well with pork and duck. In Chinese red cooking, where the ingredients are simmered for a lengthy period in dark soy sauce; star anise is nearly always added to beef and chicken dishes. Chinese stocks and soups very often contain the spice. It flavors marbled eggs; a decorative Chinese hors d’oeuvre or snack. Mandarins with jaded palates chew the whole dried fruit habitually as a post-prandial digestant and breath sweetener - an oriental comfit. In the West; star anise is added in fruit compotes and jams; and in the manufacture of anise-flavored liqueurs; the best known being anisette.


Outside of China; star anise is featured in several of Vietnam's signature dishes; such as Pho Bo soup. It is also the secret ingredient in many Indian stews and curries. Star anise can replace regular anise in western recipes.



Most often; star anise is added to a recipe whole; to be steeped in liquids and then removed before the conclusion of the recipe






WHATS' THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ANISE SEED AND STAR ANISE??

Star anise comes from the star-shaped flower of a small evergreen tree. Star anise has the scientific name Illicium verum and is an evergreen tree native to China. The tree can grow up to 40 feet tall with clusters of leathery leaves and bell-shaped pink-to-red or greenish-yellow flowers. The fruit that follows is made up of eight woody pods joined in a star shape. Each pod has one licorice-flavored seed.



It is used in Chinese and Indian cooking; as an ingredient in 5-spice powder and garam masala.

Star anise tea has been used to treat rheumatism.



Anise seed comes from the flowering anise plant. The seeds are sweet and licorice-like in flavor; resembling fennel seeds.

Anise; scientific name Pimpinella anisum L. is a annual herb native to the Mediterranean and Egypt and can be grown in the United States as a non-invasive alternative to fennel. The plant grows 2 feet tall and produces parsley-like lower leaves and lacy upper leaves and umbrella-like white flowers. The 1/6-inch oval seeds are slightly curved and produced in individual pods.



Anise is said to have a better flavor than Star Anise; and the seeds are pressed into oil and used as flavoring in licorice and other food, as the seeds are not attractive in food products. The chopped leaves may also be used as flavoring.


anise is used in perfumes and soaps and to create the liquor anisett



TURMERIC a major ingredient in Curry Powder and prepared mustard. Turmeric is used in egg dishes; rice dishes; breads;soups; noodles and in preparing chicken and fish; pickles; chow-chow; cream sauces; salad dressings; relish; and mayonnaise.


SUGGESTIONS:

1/8 teaspoon in 6 stuffed or scrambled eggs

¼ teaspoon for 1 cup uncooked rice

¼ teaspoon in 2 cups white or cheese sauce

1/8 to ¼ teaspoon in ½ cup butter for basting chicken and seafood when broiling or baking

¼ to ½ teaspoon in 1 cup mayonnaise or sour cream for dressing or dunk for shrimp; lobster and other sea food.



VANILLA BEAN use Vanilla to flavor most sweet foods such as eggnog; milk shakes; hot chocolate; cakes; cookies; candies; glazes; frosting; whipped cream; pies; coffee;tortes; meringue shells; cheesecakes; dessert souffles; sweet breads; muffins; fruit desserts and stewed fruits;fruit compotes; poached pears and rice pudding and Ice cream.


SUGGESTIONS:

¼ to ½ teaspoons in 1 cup heavy cream, whipped

1 teaspoons in 2 cups custard sauce

1 to 1 ½ teaspoons in frosting for 2 cake layers

2 to 3 teaspoons in cookie recipe making about 5 dozen

2 teaspoons in about 4 cups custard for making ice cream





 
 

WHAT ABOUT BASIL???

 



BASILS


It may not be well known, but BASIL is part of the mint family, or family Lamiaceae


Here is an alphabetical breakdown of some of the BASILS that I'm familiar with. Any of you out there that care to add to the list, please do!


AFRICAN BLUE BASIL While not recommended for culinary uses, African blue basil is more often used as an ornamental. A properly tended plant with plenty of room to expand can easily become a grand showpiece in your late spring or early summer garden, making itself the center of conversation among your guests. In zones 9 (maybe 8A) and warmer, given the right protection, this beauty can sometimes transform itself into a cherished perennial.

Because it can mature to four feet, African blue basil works best at the back of an annual border. It's wonderful pink and purple flowers with purple stems and leaves add to its desirability. In fact, many gardeners choose this basil in place of pink- or purple-flowering sage. There’s no need to be afraid of this plants ample volume as, like most basils, it is easily trimmed back.




BUSH BASIL (Ocimum minimum) is a dwarf species. It has similar constituents and flavor to the sweet basil.




CINNAMON BASIL – The name describes it all – basil with a cinnamon flavor. As you can imagine, its strong cinnamon scent easily distinguishes it from the others. It also has a somewhat harrier leaf. This medium-sized annual grows up to 2 ½ feet tall and produces pale pink to purple flowers.

Cinnamon basil is commonly used in hot drinks and added to fruits.



DARK OPAL BASIL Dark opal resembles a glossy-leafed, burgundy-and-purple coleus with pink flowers. While this two-foot annual is great for landscapes, it can also add a hint of exotic color to culinary favorites such as Italian Caprese or spring garden salads.



GENOVESE BASIL – A well-regarded favorite among foodies, Genovese basil is considered the best basil for use in Italian recipes (pesto, tomato-basil sauce, Caprese salad, etc.) Like sweet basil, this annual has a strong clove fragrance and ranges from 12 to 24 inches in height, but is easily distinguished by its more crinkly and in-turned leaves.

Genovese basil is one of the most popular types and is often used to make pesto. In Italy, it is considered a sign of love. It is claimed that the best Genovese basil, used to make real pesto, is grown in Northern Italy near the city of Genoa.









HOLY BASIL The attractive green and purple foliage of this perennial, combined with a strong showing of pink and white flowers, make this is an ideal landscape addition. Reaching heights up to three feet with a two-foot span, this hairy-leafed plant produces a fragrant clove scent. While holy basil can be used for culinary purposes in cooked foods, its hairy leaves and woodier stems make it difficult for use as a fresh herb. Holy basil stands the best chance for returning year after year in zones 9 or warmer.

HOLY BASIL, also known as TULSI, is commonly used in Thai cuisine and teas. It is native to the Old World Tropics, and often grows as a weed. Holy basil has been used for thousands of years to heal people and is even worshiped in parts of India.



Holy basil makes a therapeutic addition to the garden! Its leaves, chopped fresh or dried, can be infused to make a sort of basil tea. It’s good for everything that ails a person, and for the sick in need, there’s absolutely no over-doing it. In cooking, it kind of acts like a multi-spice, so make sure to taste and smell it before adding it to anything, and test its taste with other things. Holy basil has licorice/anise notes, citrus/lemony notes, minty notes, and clove-like notes — and the citrus, clove, and mint notes are about equal.

LEMON BASIL Similar to the other basils, this annual grows to a height of about two feet, but complements salads, dressing and teas with a savory lemon flavor and fragrance. This basil is a bit spindlier than its other basil relatives and is characterized by a flatter, narrower leaf

Popular for its strong, lemon scent, it is most often used in dishes in Indonesia, Thailand, and Laos.




MAMMOTH BASIL

Originating in Italy, mammoth basil has leaves that resemble lettuce and have jagged edges. When mature, the plant will be about 14 to 18 inches tall. The large mammoth basil leaves are often used in pesto or used whole in salads.



PERILLA, SHISHO (a basil relative) – There are a few kinds of perilla but this species, with green leaves and purple spots is perhaps the best for cooking. Used most often in Asian cuisine, Shisho has a cinnamon-lemon flavor. Perilla frutecens var “autopurpurea” (also known as a beefsteak plant) is an interesting relative that I’ve included here because of its much stronger licorice flavor that some cooks thoroughly enjoy.

Because it is often confused with coleus, it can double as ornamental basil. Even though it’s an annual, it spreads from seed.

PERILLA (a basil relative ) – Perilla frutecens var “crispa” and “autopurpurea” are also interesting relatives of basil that can be used as ornamentals. AUTOPURPUREA is almost entirely purple while CRISPA has very frilly, divided leaves. Both of these plants can take a little more shade than regular basil, but you shouldn’t expect it to develop the best flavor without more sunlight. Like its relatives, it needs plenty of growing space as it also spreads wildly from seed. Another great plant for the brown-thumbed gardener.








PURPLE RUFFLES BASIL This is a great plant to spice up the kitchen and the landscape! Perhaps the most colorful basil for landscapes, purple ruffles makes a great addition to salads and pesto. Similar in color to the dark opal, this plant is slightly smaller in stature (reaches up to 1 ½ feet) and its leaves are very frilly and ruffled. While it can handle a shadier spot in the garden, it still needs at least three hours of sunlight to mature properly. Purple ruffles gives off a combination of licorice and cinnamon scents and produces lavender and pink flowers that can also be eaten. Somewhat difficult to start from seeds, this plants works best from transplants.


RED RUBIN basil is a unique, sweet type of basil that has dark purple leaves. Its flavor is sweet like sweet basil, and is used commonly in salads and as a garnish.



SIAM QUEEN BASIL – Siam queen is a type of Thai basil that produces mint green leaves with very large flower heads – up to 6 inches across – that give off a spicy anise scent. ( it smells great!) It reaches heights up to 2 ½ feet, but it can be pinched back – and even eaten! – to restrict growth.



SPICY GLOBE

Spicy globe basil is similar to the taste of sweet basil. The main difference with this type is that is grows small, dense, and compact, at most 10 inches tall. Spicy globe basil is perfect for pots and small gardens.

You may purchase SPICY GLOBE BASIL from my store!


SWEET BASIL (Ocimum basilicum) is one of the most common and important culinary herbs in the world and is considered the king of herbs. It has been used for thousands of years in Italian dishes. Sweet basil can be used in almost any dish including meat, pizza, pasta, salad, and in sauces.


Basil and tomatoes go together; in the garden as well as in your sandwich. This is used widely in Mediterranean cuisine. Some of the most famous Italian dishes rely for their memorable flavor on this herb.


Also used as an insect repellant or fly repellant. I use equal parts of basil and sage together whenever I

start noticing flies appearing in my kitchen. I mixed the basil and sage together, ( you only need about ½ teaspoon of each) put it on a paper towel ( I've been known to turn the cover of a jar up and put some in it, you can use a small glass dish or custard cup, anything, as long as it is open) near where the flies seem to be and after a few minutes the flies go away. They don't die, so you don't need to worry about dead flies around. They just go away. I have requested that the waitress or cook in restaurants mix this and bring it to the table, when there are flies in the dining area. More than one cook has actually come out and thanked me and said they'll be using this mixture in the kitchen from then on. So,give a try. Even if the kids get in to it, it won't hurt them.





THAI BASIL, used commonly in Thai and Vietnamese cuisines, has a flavor of licorice and mint this annual is also referred to as anise or licorice basil. It reaches heights up to 24 inches and with a nearly two-foot expanse. . It has small green leaves and purple stems. Thai basil goes great with seafood, chicken, pork, and in curry sauces. stir-fried dishes. Thai basil can also be found served raw with pho, which is a soup made of noodles. In Taiwan, Thai basil can be found in the popular Three Cup Chicken dish. Thai basil is more easily found in specialty grocery stores that carry exotic or high-end fresh herbs.

THAI BASIL IS ONE OF THE BASILS THAT I AM GROWING THIS YEAR! Feel free to look in my store for dried THAI BASIL.



There are three common types of basil that are usually found in Thai cuisine.

HORAPHA,

KRAPHAO, and

MAENGLAK.

KRAPHAO IS better known as Thai holy basil while

MAENGLAK is better known as Thai lemon basil.

All three types, though similar, have different and distinct flavors when used in culinary dishes.

THAI HOLY BASIL is widely used in Indian dishes and is even worshiped and smells of cloves.

culinary uses of thai basil

Thai basil is most commonly used and found in chicken, pork, and curry dishes in Thailand and Vietnam.



WILD BASIL ( Calamintha clinopodium) is a species from northern Europe. It has a scent and flavor reminiscent of thyme.




 
 

Oregano!! umm, which one??

 

OREGANO?? WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE??


Oregano seems to be one those herbs that people don't seem to differentiate one from another when using them. For instance, when making pizza and the recipe calls for oregano, which oregano is the recipe referring to? With just about all herbs, there's more than one type of the herb. Do you wanna know the difference oregano's and what they are used for? OK, now that you're on board, here we go!



BRISTOL CROSS OREGANO has beautiful Asian looking pinkish-purple flowers and a mild oregano flavor and aroma. Bristol Cross Oregano is used in tomato based dishes, pasta, rice, sauces, and vinegars.


CRINKLE LEAF MARJORAM is a low mounding Marjoram with attractive, golden crinkled leaves.

Use this oregano in pastas, tomato sauces, meat and vegetable dishes and herbal vinegars.


GOLDEN OREGANO (Origanum vulgare “Aureum”) use in tomato dishes, rice, pasta, sauces, dressings, vinegars


GREEK OREGANO (Origanum heracleoticum ) is as essential to pizza as Mexican oregano is to chili powder. You may use the two types interchangeably but using one specifically increases the authenticity of certain dishes. MEXICAN OREGANO has a more earthy flavor with less hint of mint in the aroma. Use it for your Mexican cooking. Set them side by side and you will quickly see the difference. MEXICAN OREGANO has an abundance of what appear to be tiny flower buds and leaves while GREEK OREGANO has a more cut-leaf appearance.

Greek oregano tends to be the most savory and earthy, while Italian is milder

Greek Oregano’s flavor is hot and peppery.


Its spicy yet refreshing flavor contributes to Italian, Greek, and Spanish cuisine, as well as Mexican. Complementary spices to Oregano are Thyme, Parsley, Chives, Basil, and Chili. Oregano is delicious in bread, pasta dishes, stuffing, and of course pizza.


ITALIAN OREGANO Origanum majoricum.


A delicious culinary herb that is essential to your Italian dishes. Italian Oregano is an excellent variety with a strong spicy flavor used in Italian cooking. A native of the Mediterranean region, Italian’ Oregano – the most famous variety in the oregano family, has the nick-name “Pizza Herb.” It is perfect for Italian, Greek, Spanish and Mexican dishes

It is spicy enough to be delicious in Mexican cuisine, like salsas or chili-flavored dishes, yet mild enough to be the best Oregano variety for Italian and Greek food.



MEXICAN OREGANO ( Lippia graveolens) is used to flavor pork, fish, beans, stews, soups, tacos, salsas, tomato based sauces and as an ingredient in seasoning blends. It is even used to flavor a cheese cake and make a herbal tea called té de pais in some rural areas. Mexican Oregano's flavor is a sharp classic Oregano with citrus notes and a hint of sweetness. The bite of the volatile oils in this aromatic herb is so strong that a pinch chewed in the mouth causes a mild numbness to the tongue.


SWEET MARJORAM – (Origanum majorana)

A near relative of Oregano, Marjoram is sweeter and milder than its cousin. Marjoram blends particularly well with meats, tomato, and rice dishes, and is found in French, Italian, and Greek cooking. Try Sweet Marjoram with poultry, mushrooms, egg dishes, potatoes and herbed butters.


Besides being delicious in savory dishes, Sweet Marjoram is extolled for its soothing properties, and is often steeped into a tea to relieve headaches, tension, nausea and PMS.




TURKISH OREGANO (Origanum tyttanticum ) This one has a strong but not-too-hot flavor. It is the favorite for Mediterranean cooking

Turkish Oregano is an especially sweet, spicy, but not-too-hot variety of Origanum. Turkish Oregano is a favorite in meat dishes and pizza sauces or any Mediterranean recipe



VARIEGATED OREGANO a low mounding habit and milder flavor than most oregano's.

use in fresh salads, vegetable dishes, salsa, meat dishes .

It has a milder flavor than most Oregano, yet still very flavorful. The tender, delicately textured leaves are perfect for fresh salads and vegetable dishes. Makes a nice salsa as well.

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HERBS THAT GO WITH GAME

Here are some herbs that go well with Game. You'll notice that certain herbs such as juniper berries, onion, garlic, thyme keeps appearing, as well as spices such as nutmeg and cinnamon.  Under EXTRA  I 've included some wines, cheeses, and other items that may be of interest that you can use together with the herbs mentioned.

                     ENJOY!!

 

GAME:


DUCK:    chervil , cinnamon, coriander, cumin seeds , dill weed, fennel seeds, ginger, juniper berries, lemon zest, marjoram, paprika, rosemary, saffron, sage, tarragon, thyme, turmeric

EXTRA: sweet white wine, dry white wine, sweet sherry, brandy, cognac, oranges, raisins, yogurt


GOOSE:   aniseed, bay leaf, caraway seeds, cinnamon ,cayenne, coriander, garlic, ginger, juniper berries, lemon zest, minced meat, onion, sage, thyme

EXTRA: Madeira, dry white wine,  gin,  dry red wine, calvados, raisins, yogurt


PHEASANT:    bay leaf, cayenne, cloves, garlic, juniper berries, leeks, lemon grass, onion, black and white and green peppercorns, paprika, rosemary, sage, thyme

EXTRA: dry white wine, cognac, sweet vermouth, Glenfarclas malt whiskey, gin, oranges, dry mustard, Stilton, Roquefort


GROUSE: mushrooms, nutmeg, shallots, thyme

EXTRA: hazelnuts, muscat grapes, oranges. Madeira, muscat wine, green tea, yogurt


PARTRIDGE/ QUAIL:     bay leaf, cardamom, cinnamon, chilli peppers, cayenne pepper, coriander, cumin, garlic, garam masala, ginger, lemon zest, mint, nutmeg, onion, parsley, ground saffron, sage, thyme

EXTRA: brandy, dry white wine, sweet wine, champagne (quails), cognac



DEER:    allspice , cardamom, ground cumin, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, cloves, chilli powder, coriander leaves, dill, garlic, ginger, juniper berries, lemon, nutmeg, onion, oregano, parsley, rosemary, star anise, thyme

EXTRA: dry white wine, Madeira, dry sherry, cognac, cider, kumquats, mushrooms, yogurt, coconut


RABBIT/HARE:    bouquet garni ( parsley, bay leaf, celery leaves, marjoram, lemon zest), cinnamon, cloves, garlic, ginger, juniper berries, nutmeg , onion, parsley, rosemary, saffron, tarragon , thyme

EXTRA: dry red wine,dry white wine, dark rum, raisins, pine nuts

WILD BOAR:   cayenne pepper, coriander leaves, cloves, cinnamon , garlic, ginger, juniper berries, lemon, onion, red chillis, rosemary, tarragon

EXTRA: dry red wine, dry white wine, cognac, Marsala ,cider vinegar, quince, pecorino cheese, raisins, pine nuts


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WHICH HERBS GO WELL WITH FISH

 

I thought that I might share with you a list of what herbs go with what type of fish. I have always found this to be helpful to know just which herbs to use with which fish. I've also included some types of wine and cheese

 

In another few days, I will have a list for meats, game, vegetables and fruits.

 

 

Enjoy!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                FISH FRESHWATER

 

BASS     garlic, onion, marjoram, dill, orange zest, curry powder, cayenne pepper, oregano, thyme, sweet Hungarian paprika, lemon zest, ground cumin, chili powder,

 EXTRA: Madeira, dry sherry or sake,

 

 

CATFISH       oregano, thyme, cayenne pepper, onion, jalapeno pepper, cilantro, curry powder, sweet paprika, white pepper, oregano, bay leaf

 EXTRA: Monterrey Jack cheese, rice wine vinegar

 

 

PANFISH (YELLOW PERCH, BLUEGILL, CRAPPIE, BULLHEAD, ROCK BASS, PUMPKINSEED) onion, garlic, ground cumin, chili powder, oregano, red pepper flakes, jalapeno, thyme, ground coriander, sweet paprika

 EXTRA: cheddar cheese

 

 

PERCH          garlic, basil, dill, tarragon, ground cumin

 EXTRA: extra dry vermouth, rice wine vinegar, grated Parmesan cheese

 

 

PICKEREL       onion, garlic, fresh cilantro, coriander, cayenne pepper, ground ginger, lemon

 EXTRA: Parmesan cheese, Monterrey Jack cheese

 

 

PIKE       marjoram, onion (including red onion),garlic, curry powder, lemon/orange peel/zest,  parsley, basil, cumin seeds, cardamom, turmeric, cayenne pepper, cilantro, fresh mint  thyme, oregano, chives

EXTRA: grated Parmesan cheese, red wine vinegar, extra dry vermouth

 

 

 

SALMON ( all Pacific salmon are born in fresh water, run to the sea and then return to their birth streams to spawn)     dill weed, fennel seed ( ground), onion, lemon zest, curry powder, tarragon, ground cumin and cumin seeds, chili powder, parsley, basil, bay leaves, garlic, whole peppercorns, ground coriander, red onion, ground turmeric, thyme

 EXTRA: Japanese rice wine, dry white wine, Madeira wine

 

 

TROUT      onion, red pepper, thyme, garlic, lemon zest, oregano, bay leaves, cayenne pepper, ground turmeric, cilantro, ground cumin, summer savory, pink peppercorns, curry powder, orange zest, shallots, Sweet Hungarian paprika

EXTRA: dry white wine or extra dry vermouth, apple cider vinegar

 

 

 

WALLEYE     onion, orange zest, lime, red pepper flakes, garlic, thyme, oregano, cayenne pepper, curry powder, lemon, basil, parsley, tarragon, rosemary, sage, coriander, cilantro, Vidalia onion, tangerine

 EXTRA: grated provolone cheese, yogurt, anisette, Parmesan cheese, extra dry vermouth or dry white wine

 

WHITE BASS       onion, lime, garlic, basil, marjoram

 EXTRA: yogurt, sour cream, horseradish, good with shrimp, red wine vinegar

 

 

 

 

 

                                   SEAFOOD

 

 

BLUEFISH leeks , chives, garlic, parsley, tarragon, lemon

EXTRA: WINE: Muscadet or California Sauvignon Blanc, Parmesan cheese

 

 

CATFISH lemon zest, garlic, ginger root, garam masala, turmeric, cayenne, fennel, thyme, basil, oregano, parsley, chives

EXTRA yogurt

  

EEL parsley, shallot, thyme, sorrel, chervil, tarragon, mint, sage, lemon zest

EXTRA: dry white wine

 

 

FLOUNDER shallots, lemon zest, parsley, garlic, ginger root, cumin, coriander, cayenne

EXTRA: yogurt

 

GROUPER: onion, garlic, ginger root, garam masala, turmeric, cayenne, red pepper, basil

EXTRA: balsamic vinegar, yogurt

 

HADDOCK onion, garlic, oregano, thyme, lemon zest, garlic, ginger root , garam masala, turmeric, cayenne

EXTRA yogurt

 

 

 MACKEREL onion, garlic, parsley, basil, oregano, thyme, paprika, lemon zest

EXTRA: dry white wine

 

MUSSELS: red onion, cilantro, jalapeno, lime, garlic, ground coriander, parsley, oregano

EXTRA: dry sherry, grated Parmesan

 

OCTOPUS onion, bay leaf, parsley, peppercorns, garlic, paprika, thyme

EXTRA; dry white wine

 

SEA BASS onion, garlic, jalapeno, cilantro, parsley, thyme, lemon zest, ginger root

EXTRA: dry white wine

 

 

SHRIMP ginger root, curry powder, celery seed, basil, oregano, thyme, garlic, cayenne and red pepper flakes, parsley, lemon zest, dill

EXTRA: white wine vinegar, dry sherry, feta cheese, yogurt

 

 

SKATE onion, garlic, oregano, thyme, cayenne, parsley

EXTRA dry white wine

 

 

SQUID onion, garlic, parsley, basil, oregano

EXTRA: dry white wine, Parmesan

 

Tilapia     onion, garlic, fennel leaves and bulb, lemon zest, parsley, ginger-root, garam masala, turmeric, basil, cayenne

EXTRA: yogurt, dry white wine

 

 

 

 

 

 

FISH BROTHS, GUMBOS, SOUPS, CHOWDERS:

 

FISH BROTHS thyme, parsley, whole cloves, black peppercorns

EXTRA: dry white wine

 

 

GUMBOS: onion, garlic, jalapeno, bay leaf, fish broth, thyme, cilantro, parsley

 

 

SOUPS & CHOWDERS: basil, thyme, oregano, parsley, garlic, onion, jalapeno, curry powder, cumin

EXTRA: dry sherry, dry white wine , balsamic vinegar

 

 

 
 

PART 2: THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF USING HERBS IN OUR FOOD

GARLIC either by itself or in seasonings such as mine, helps lower cholesterol and helps prevent blood clots. Seasonings that have garlic help kill off organisms, including bacteria and viruses that cause earaches, flu and colds. Garlic can also prevent cancer.


THE MINTS are a stomach tonic that promote digestion, calm stomach muscle spasms, relieve flatulence, fights bacteria and viruses. Mint even helps reduce headache pain and boost mental alertness.


OREGANO can help unknot muscles in the digestive tract and also can lower blood pressure.


ROSEMARY is just loaded with antioxidants! Rosemary can ease asthma and other allergy symptoms.


SAGE helps fight infections, and helps alleviate symptoms of menopause, night sweats and hot flashes.


TURMERIC has anti inflammatory effects and is beneficial in relieving rheumatoid arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome. Turmeric helps to lower cholesterol and helps prevent cataracts.


So, don't be afraid of trying herbal seasonings when preparing your food! Enjoy not only a unique flavor but also added health benefits!


THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF USING HERBS IN OUR FOOD

 

GARLIC either by itself or in seasonings such as mine, helps lower cholesterol and helps prevent blood clots. Seasonings that have garlic help kill off organisms, including bacteria and viruses that cause earaches, flu and colds. Garlic can also prevent cancer.


THE MINTS are a stomach tonic that promote digestion, calm stomach muscle spasms, relieve flatulence, fights bacteria and viruses. Mint even helps reduce headache pain and boost mental alertness.


OREGANO can help unknot muscles in the digestive tract and also can lower blood pressure.


ROSEMARY is just loaded with antioxidants! Rosemary can ease asthma and other allergy symptoms.


SAGE helps fight infections, and helps alleviate symptoms of menopause, night sweats and hot flashes.


TURMERIC has anti inflammatory effects and is beneficial in relieving rheumatoid arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome. Turmeric helps to lower cholesterol and helps prevent cataracts.


So, don't be afraid of trying herbal seasonings when preparing your food! Enjoy not only a unique flavor but also added health benefits!


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