Medicine Woman

  (Waynesville, North Carolina)
dangerous herbs, medicinal herbs, culinary herbs
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herbs that are unsafe for pregnant women during the entire 9 months

There are a lot of herbs that I have found in my research that pregnant women would do well to stay away from during the entire nine months of pregnancy. In this blog, I will list the herbs  that affect hormone  levels

AUTUMN CROCUS birth defects and Down's Syndrome.

BASIL may increase rick of birth defects

BETEL NUT   causes birth defects 

BITTER ORANGE PEEL  birth defects

BORAGE OIL   may cause liver damage to the mother and harm to the fetus

BRYONY highly toxic 

BUTTERNUT may cause birth defects

CABBAGE, COLEWORT  can interfere with mental development in the fetus. 

CHASTEBERRY can cause hormonal changes and uterine bleeding

COFFEE   low birth weigh, birth defects

COLOMBO  paralysis and uterine contractions

COMFREY may cause liver complications in pregnant women and their growing baby. Toxic for the baby. 

ECHINACEA  may trigger autoimmune disorders

GINSENG    alters hormonal balance

           GUARANA contains caffeine, which has been linked to miscarriage, low birth weight, premature       
           delivery and birth defects. 

HORSETAIL may interfere with metabolism of B vitamins 

JABORANDI  This herb is toxic, may cause birth defects.

KAVA KAVA  this herb is toxic; may cause birth defects and miscarriage

KOLA NUT  low birth weigh, birth defects

LEMON BALM  external use is safe; internal use may lead to altered hormone balance and uterine bleeding 

LICORICE ROOT  not the candy. High blood pressure in pregnant women and harm to the baby. 

LIVERWORT sever gastrointestinal irritation and should not be used during pregnancy

MADASGASCAR PERIWINKLE birth defects

MATE'  low birth weight, birth defects 

MUGWORT birth defects 

PENNY ROYAL LEAF  birth defects

UVA URSI may hinder the blood flow to the mother's uterus. 

SAW PALMETTO decreases the amount of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the pregnant mother's body. If the women is having a little boy, DHT is very important for development of his genitals. If a girl, it has anti estrogenic effects that will affect the pregnant women. 

SEA BUCKTHORN  birth defects 

SENNA  (Cassia spp)   birth defects

SPEEDWELL may cause miscarriage and birth defects.

Avoid the pits of APRICOT, PEACH, CHERRY  they contain cyanide.



Part two discusses more herbs that are unsafe for pregnant women. 

Natural Health Magazine complete guide to safe herbs  by chris d. meletis, n.d

The Honest Herbal by Varro E Tyler

Know Your Poisonour Plants by Wilma Roberts James 

livestrong.com

webmd 





 
 

HERBS FOR VEGETABLES, uncooked


 

Often times at the farmers market where I go, I hear people say that they are vegetarians and therefore don’t use herbs.   What I tell them: “O  Honeee, you don’t know what you’re missing!”  Just one herb can change the whole taste of your dish!

 

LET’S  START WITH A SALAD. For the most part, all you need is just a touch .  By that, I mean a very little amount.  You want to make your salad have a faint taste of "something else" that a person can just taste. 

 Most people have a pepper grinder and if you empty it and put in fennel seeds, grind that over your next vegetable salad and I can almost guarantee you that you will wonder how you managed without this wonderful taste!

If you have "Italian Seasoning" sprinkle that lightly all over your salad. 

Basil, either the fresh leaves or dried leaves can also be added to your salad.

Mint, particularly peppermint, spearmint and/or chocolate mint can really make for a cool salad.  Speaking of which, you can also use Lemon Balm or Lemon Verbena to your salad for a little bit of lemony flavor.  (Lemon Grass unless really, really fine might not be a good idea).

Dandelion blossoms and the greens when young, make for a very healthy salad. (Just make sure of your surroundings!  The neighbors’ dog will Not add to your health!)

Of course any of the onion family such as onions (Vidalia are great in a salad as are yellow onions),leeks, scallions, shallots, cilantro, chives, and garlic.

Dill weed, just a touch!

Oregano, and/or  Lemon thyme   again, just a touch!

Parsley, preferably fresh parsley

Rocket a/k/a arugula or rugula, roquette can be used as a salad green.

Burnet or salad burnet and  Watercress can also make for an interesting addition.

Tarragon, ( as in French or Mexican, not Russian)  particularly fresh, but recently dried is good too. Again, just a touch! Tarragon has a slightly spicy taste.

For those who really want to be a little daring, add grated horseradish; cayenne peppers or any of the other hot peppers, cilantro. Turmeric and curry can be quite interesting

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

More Herbs and Food Combinations part two

 

A while back, I did a blog on spices and what they go well with. This time I will just use the herb and what foods it will enhance. Look through my blogs and you will also see how to make up your own spice blends, such as PUMPKIN PIE SPICE BLEND, SPICED NUTS, SPICY APPLE PIE BLEND, and more. You will find in another blog what spices will enhance what foods.


For those of you that are artistic, this would make a beautiful gift for someone who likes to cook and bake, or is new at cooking and baking. I had a friend who copied something like this by hand in calligraphy, on a long sheet of paper, dyed the paper some pretty color and made colored scroll work all around the edges, and made a small frame all around and made it so that it could be hung on the wall. She also said a few words of friendship and put her name on the bottom and DATED it. It was a very personalized gift. See what you can do!!     (email me for  PDF file and I will gladly send it to you!)


ANISE use in: sweet cream cheese appetizers, soups, fruit salads, applesauce, teas, fruit drinks, carrots, celery, coleslaw, sole, crab, spicy meat mixtures, cakes, cookies, sweet rolls, rye breads



BASIL use in: dips, canapes, all kinds of soups and stews, green salads, especially good on tomatoes, omelets, scrambled eggs, green beans, broccoli, cucumbers, egg plant, peas, spinach, zucchini, shrimp, fish, creole dishes, beef, pork, veal, lamb, all kinds of poultry and stuffing, wine vinegar



BAY use in: bouquet garni, fish chowders, tomato juice and stocks, with poached fish; in hearty fish dishes; and with roast chicken, beef roasts, and beef stew.



BORAGE use in; mild dips, all kinds of soups and stews, green salads, coleslaw, iced drinks, spinach, beets, shellfish, all kinds of meat and poultry and stuffing, cream sauces



BURNET use in: appetizer dips, canapes, cream soups, green salads, potato salad, iced drinks, asparagus, mushrooms, shellfish, tarter sauce, wine vinegar



CARAWAY use in: appetizer spreads and dips, canapes, potato soup, cabbage soups, goulash, coleslaw, potato salad, cream cheese, cottage cheese, cabbage, potatoes, green beans, carrots, red beets, cauliflower, casseroles, German dishes,meatballs, applesauce, cookies, breads,especially rye, apple pie, cakes



CELERY SEED use in: soups, stews, salads, curry dishes, poultry stuffing, fish and meat dishes, eggs, breads, vegetables



CHERVIL use in: potato, spinach and cream soups, in egg and chicken salads, salad dressings and mayonnaise, with fish, shellfish and chicken; in fish sauces and cheese spreads, with lettuce, potatoes, red beets and tomatoes and in a fines herbes combination




CHIVES use in: all kinds of appetizers, all kinds of soups, stews, all kinds of salads, omelets, cheese dishes, deviled eggs, potatoes,carrots, corn, green beans, mushrooms, peas, red beets, summer squash, tomatoes, all kinds of other vegetables, shellfish, broiled fish, all kinds of meat and poultry, tartar sauce, butter sauces,cheese sauces, wine vinegar




CORIANDER use the seeds in curries and pickling spice mixtures; with lentils, lima beans, peas, potato dumplings, in biscuits, breads, lamb dishes; carrot cake and pies.


Use the leaves in: Mexican, Chinese, Indian and Moroccan dishes, in meat, rice and lentil dishes; with corn, zucchini , chicken, and in salads.



CUMIN use in; Mexican, oriental, and Indian and middle eastern dishes, in curries, stews, chili, spicy meat and vegetable dishes; with green beans,cabbage, in deviled eggs; breads and with cheese



DILL use the leaves in:all kinds of appetizers, potato soups,salads and salmon; potato salad, rice dishes and borscht; green salads, coleslaw, cottage cheese, green beans, carrots, cucumbers and potatoes. omelets, cauliflower, tomatoes, halibut, salmon, lamb, ham, cream chicken, tartar sauce, butter sauces, wine vinegar, rye bread


use the seeds in: salad dressings, fish soups, meat dishes, lamb stew,, and egg and potato dishes, cabbage and in breads.



FENNEL use the seeds and leaves with fish; in spicy meat mixtures; with eggs, cabbage, red beets, squash and apples; in stuffings and breads


use Florence fennel as a vegetable; serve raw like celery, braise, bake au gratin or turn into a cream soup.



GARLIC Use with everything except sweets. Use for soups, salads, fish, poultry, meat and egg dishes; in stews, sauces an mayonnaise, in breads and with any vegetables; to make oil and vinegar dressings.



GINGER use fresh ginger in oriental and Indian dishes, with fish, chicken, meats and vegetables


use dried ginger with pot roasts, poultry, carrots, red beets, squash and sweet potatoes; in breads, cakes, cookies, puddings, fruit salads and stewed fruit mixtures.




HORSERADISH use in cocktail and mustard sauces; in sauces for fish, roast beef and in green vegetables; in salad dressings; with boiled meats; in sandwiches and with red beets


LOVAGE Use the leaves and stalks sparingly as a celery substitute in soups, salads, potato salad, stews and stuffings; braise the stalks as a vegetable.

use the seeds in chicken salad, meat loaf, breads and herb butters.





MARJORAM use in: cream cheese dips and appetizers, all kinds of soups and stews, green salads, chicken salad, vegetable cocktails, omelets, scrambled eggs, carrots, spinach, squash,eggplant, cabbage, lima beans, mushrooms, peas, and tomatoes; baked or broiled fish, fish recipes and fish chowders, all kinds of meat, chicken, duck goose, gravies, fish sauces, biscuits, muffins




MINTS use in: green pea soups, split pea soups, fruit salads, teas, iced drinks, , green beans, new peas, baked or broiled fish, lamb, veal, mint sauces, mint jellies, wine vinegar, mint syrups, sherbets




ONION use for all dishes except sweets. Use in soups, stews, salad, egg dishes, fish, poultry, meat and all vegetables, some breads.



OREGANO use in: appetizers spreads, canapes, onion soup, all stews, seafood salads, aspics, omelets, spicy cheese, onions, peas, baked beans, shellfish, all kinds of meats, game, hare, venison, cream sauces, tomato sauces, meat-pie crusts, breads



PARSLEY use in: all kinds of appetizers, all kinds of soups and stews, all kinds of salads, vegetable cocktails, omelets, cheeses, all kinds of vegetables, all kinds of fish and seafood, all kinds of meat, stuffing, tartar sauce, butter sauces, breads, rolls



ROSEMARY use in : cheese appetizers and dips, all kinds of soups ( chicken soup, pea soup) and stews, chicken salads, seafood salads, vegetable juices, omelets, sharp cheese, potatoes, mushrooms, salmon, haddock, cod, all kinds of meats and poultry, wild game, stuffing, gravies, breads, rolls, biscuits



SAGE use in : cheese dips appetizers, cream soups, chowders, sharp cheese, cottage cheese, eggplant, Lima beans, baked or broiled fish, meat loaf, roasts, chicken, turkey, game, stuffing, brown sauce, muffins, breads



SAVORY use in : cheese dips and appetizers, bean soups, chowders, aspics, green salads, vegetable cocktails, deviled eggs, omelets, green beans, sauerkraut, salt water fish, all kinds of meat, chicken, duck,, turkey, fish sauces, cream sauce, meat-pie crusts



TARRAGON use in: all kinds of appetizers, chicken soup, mushroom soup, all kinds of salads, vegetable cocktails, omelets, cream cheese, asparagus, all fish, steaks, chicken, duck turkey, cream sauce, Hollandaise



THYME use in : shrimp dips, vegetable soup and stews, all other types of stews, tomato aspic, lemon tea, cottage cheese, cream cheese, beans, onions, potatoes, all kinds of fish, roasts, meat loaf, ham, stuffing, turkey, all tomato sauces, breads, rolls.



TURMERIC use as a cheap saffron substitute for its bright yellow color. Good in curries, salads, dressings and mustard; with seafood, fish, poultry and meat; in rice dishes; and with eggs



WATERCRESS use liberally in salads, chicken salad, bean salad, potato salad, and coleslaw; in tomato juice, soups and egg dishes; with cottage cheese; and in herb butters.

 
 

WHAT HERBS GO WITH WHAT FOODS??

 


I thought that I might like to share with you some herb ideas that go with foods. I keep a paper in my spice and herb drawer to match foods with. Maybe some of you might enjoy a list to look quickly at to see what herbs you can use to go with what foods your preparing:


                                                              MEATS

 

CHICKEN                  anise,   basil, bay leaf, chives,  cinnamon, cumin, dill, fenugreek, garlic, ginger, marjoram, onion, oregano, parsley, rosemary, saffron, sage,  tarragon, thyme

 

TURKEY                       basil, garlic, marjoram, onion, oregano, parsley, rosemary, saffron, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme

 

DUCK                        chervil, ginger, thyme,

 

 

BEEF                basil, bay, caraway, cumin, fenugreek, garlic, ginger, marjoram, onion, oregano, parsley,    rosemary, sage, savory, shallot, tarragon,   thyme

 

HAMBURGER           cayenne pepper, oregano, paprika, thyme

 

STEAK                        chives, garlic, rosemary, thyme

 

LAMB                       basil, bay, cinnamon, coriander, cumin, dill, garlic, lemon balm, mint, marjoram,  onion, parsley, rosemary, saffron, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme

 

HAM                           cinnamon, ginger, sage

 

PORK                    anise, basil, bay, caraway, cardamom, coriander, cumin, dill, fennel, garlic, ginger, oregano, rosemary, saffron sage,   tarragon, thyme

 

 

                                                       EGGS

 

             Anise, basil, caraway, cayenne pepper, chervil, chives, coriander,  dill, fennel, marjoram, oregano, parsley, rosemary, saffron, sage,  savory, shallot, sorrel, tarragon, thyme

 

FRITTATAS         black pepper, rosemary, thyme,

 

OMELETS:       chervil,   oregano,   parsley,

 

 

   QUICHES            basil, dill, marjoram,

         

    SOUFFLES        basil, cayenne, chives

 

 

 

                                                                         RICE

Basil, fennel, lovage, saffron, tarragon, thyme

 

 

 

 

CHEESE

 

                   basil, caraway, chervil, chives, cumin seed, dill, lovage, marjoram, mints, parsley, poppy seeds, sage, savory, sesame seed, shallot, tarragon, thyme

 

 

SOUPS   

 

 

                  basil, bay, calendula, caraway, chervil, chives, cumin, dill , fennel, lovage, marjoram, mints, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, sorrel, tarragon, thyme, lemon thyme

 

 

VEGETABLES   :

   

  ASPARAGUS:          chives, lemon balm, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme,

   

 FRESH BEANS:         basil, caraway, cloves, dill, marjoram, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory, thyme

   

  BROCCOLI :             basil, curry powder, dill, garlic, lemon balm, marjoram, oregano, tarragon,  thyme

  

CARROTS:             anise, basil, chervil, chives, cinnamon, cloves, cumin, dill, ginger, marjoram, mint, parsley, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme

 

CAULIFLOWER:     basil, caraway, chives, cumin, curry powder, dill, garlic, marjoram, parsley, rosemary, savory, tarragon

 

EGGPLANT:             basil, cinnamon,   curry powder,   dill, garlic, marjoram, mint, onion,   oregano, parsley, sage, savory, rosemary, thyme 

 

MUSHROOMS          black pepper, coriander, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, tarragon, thyme

 

ONION:                     chives, rosemary, sage, savory

 

PARSNIPS               basil, dill, marjoram, parsley, savory, thyme

 

PEAS                           basil, caraway, chervil, chives, mint, rosemary, savory, tarragon, thyme

 

POTATOES                 basil, caraway, chives, coriander, dill, fennel, garlic, lovage, marjoram, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, tarragon, thyme

 

SPINACH                   anise, basil, black pepper, caraway seed,  chervil, chives, cinnamon, dill, garlic, parsley , rosemary, thyme  ,

 

SQUASH           basil, caraway, cardamom, clove, ginger, marjoram, dill, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory

 

 

TOMATOES                basil, bay leaf, black pepper, chives, coriander, dill,  garlic, lovage, marjoram, oregano, parsley,  rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme

 

ZUCCHINI                 basil, dill, tarragon, thyme

 

 

 

SAUCES AND SUCH:

 

MAYONNAISE          basil, curry powder, parsley, tarragon

 

HOLLANDAISE       cayenne, paprika

 

COCKTAIL               celery seeds, chives, parsley

 

CHEESE        cayenne, curry powder, dry mustard, paprika

 

 BUTTER        basil, chives, oregano, tarragon, thyme

 

BEARNAISE      chervil, parsley, tarragon

 

BARBECUE       cayenne, chili powder, cumin, paprika

 

 

 

FISH:  

 

TROUT               basil, chives, rosemary, sage, tarragon

 

SHRIMP             cayenne, garlic, parsley, oregano

 

SHELLFISH      black pepper, chives, garlic, and thyme

 

SALMON         chervil, dill, parsley

 

LOBSTER           parsley, tarragon, thyme

 

CRAB MEAT      chives, marjoram

 

COD             parsley, tarragon, thyme

 

 

                                                             GAME: 

 

DUCK                chervil, cinnamon, coriander    cumin seeds,   dill weed, fennel seeds, ginger,   juniper berries, lemon zest, marjoram, paprika, rosemary, saffron, sage, tarragon, thyme,    turmeric

 

GOOSE                    aniseed,   bay leaf, caraway seeds, cinnamon, cayenne, coriander, garlic, ginger,  juniper berries, lemon zest,  minced meat, onion, sage,  thyme

 

 

PHEASANT         bay leaf, cayenne, cloves, garlic, juniper berries, leeks, lemon grass, onion,     black and white and green peppercorns,       paprika,    rosemary, sage, thyme

 

GROUSE                mushrooms, nutmeg, shallots, thyme,

 

PARTRIDGE/ QUAIL:    bay leaf, cardamoms, cinnamon, chili peppers,   cayenne pepper, coriander,  cumin,  garlic, garam masala,  ginger, lemon zest,  mint, nutmeg, onion,  parsley, ground saffron,  sage,   thyme

 

DEER          allspice ,  cardamom,  ground cumin,  cinnamon, cayenne pepper, cloves, chili powder,  coriander leaves,  dill,    garlic,    ginger,    juniper berries, lemon,  nutmeg, onion,   oregano,   parsley,  rosemary, star anise, thyme,

 

WILD BOAR           cayenne pepper, coriander leaves, cloves, cinnamon, garlic,      ginger, juniper berries,      lemon, onion,   red chills, rosemary, tarragon, 

 

RABBIT/HARE          bouquet garni (parsley, bay leaf, celery leaves, marjoram, lemon zest),    cinnamon, cloves, garlic, ginger, juniper berries, nutmeg,   onion,   parsley, rosemary, saffron, tarragon,  thyme 

                                  


 

 

 
 

WHAT ABOUT BASIL???

 



BASILS


It may not be well known, but BASIL is part of the mint family, or family Lamiaceae


Here is an alphabetical breakdown of some of the BASILS that I'm familiar with. Any of you out there that care to add to the list, please do!


AFRICAN BLUE BASIL While not recommended for culinary uses, African blue basil is more often used as an ornamental. A properly tended plant with plenty of room to expand can easily become a grand showpiece in your late spring or early summer garden, making itself the center of conversation among your guests. In zones 9 (maybe 8A) and warmer, given the right protection, this beauty can sometimes transform itself into a cherished perennial.

Because it can mature to four feet, African blue basil works best at the back of an annual border. It's wonderful pink and purple flowers with purple stems and leaves add to its desirability. In fact, many gardeners choose this basil in place of pink- or purple-flowering sage. There’s no need to be afraid of this plants ample volume as, like most basils, it is easily trimmed back.




BUSH BASIL (Ocimum minimum) is a dwarf species. It has similar constituents and flavor to the sweet basil.




CINNAMON BASIL – The name describes it all – basil with a cinnamon flavor. As you can imagine, its strong cinnamon scent easily distinguishes it from the others. It also has a somewhat harrier leaf. This medium-sized annual grows up to 2 ½ feet tall and produces pale pink to purple flowers.

Cinnamon basil is commonly used in hot drinks and added to fruits.



DARK OPAL BASIL Dark opal resembles a glossy-leafed, burgundy-and-purple coleus with pink flowers. While this two-foot annual is great for landscapes, it can also add a hint of exotic color to culinary favorites such as Italian Caprese or spring garden salads.



GENOVESE BASIL – A well-regarded favorite among foodies, Genovese basil is considered the best basil for use in Italian recipes (pesto, tomato-basil sauce, Caprese salad, etc.) Like sweet basil, this annual has a strong clove fragrance and ranges from 12 to 24 inches in height, but is easily distinguished by its more crinkly and in-turned leaves.

Genovese basil is one of the most popular types and is often used to make pesto. In Italy, it is considered a sign of love. It is claimed that the best Genovese basil, used to make real pesto, is grown in Northern Italy near the city of Genoa.









HOLY BASIL The attractive green and purple foliage of this perennial, combined with a strong showing of pink and white flowers, make this is an ideal landscape addition. Reaching heights up to three feet with a two-foot span, this hairy-leafed plant produces a fragrant clove scent. While holy basil can be used for culinary purposes in cooked foods, its hairy leaves and woodier stems make it difficult for use as a fresh herb. Holy basil stands the best chance for returning year after year in zones 9 or warmer.

HOLY BASIL, also known as TULSI, is commonly used in Thai cuisine and teas. It is native to the Old World Tropics, and often grows as a weed. Holy basil has been used for thousands of years to heal people and is even worshiped in parts of India.



Holy basil makes a therapeutic addition to the garden! Its leaves, chopped fresh or dried, can be infused to make a sort of basil tea. It’s good for everything that ails a person, and for the sick in need, there’s absolutely no over-doing it. In cooking, it kind of acts like a multi-spice, so make sure to taste and smell it before adding it to anything, and test its taste with other things. Holy basil has licorice/anise notes, citrus/lemony notes, minty notes, and clove-like notes — and the citrus, clove, and mint notes are about equal.

LEMON BASIL Similar to the other basils, this annual grows to a height of about two feet, but complements salads, dressing and teas with a savory lemon flavor and fragrance. This basil is a bit spindlier than its other basil relatives and is characterized by a flatter, narrower leaf

Popular for its strong, lemon scent, it is most often used in dishes in Indonesia, Thailand, and Laos.




MAMMOTH BASIL

Originating in Italy, mammoth basil has leaves that resemble lettuce and have jagged edges. When mature, the plant will be about 14 to 18 inches tall. The large mammoth basil leaves are often used in pesto or used whole in salads.



PERILLA, SHISHO (a basil relative) – There are a few kinds of perilla but this species, with green leaves and purple spots is perhaps the best for cooking. Used most often in Asian cuisine, Shisho has a cinnamon-lemon flavor. Perilla frutecens var “autopurpurea” (also known as a beefsteak plant) is an interesting relative that I’ve included here because of its much stronger licorice flavor that some cooks thoroughly enjoy.

Because it is often confused with coleus, it can double as ornamental basil. Even though it’s an annual, it spreads from seed.

PERILLA (a basil relative ) – Perilla frutecens var “crispa” and “autopurpurea” are also interesting relatives of basil that can be used as ornamentals. AUTOPURPUREA is almost entirely purple while CRISPA has very frilly, divided leaves. Both of these plants can take a little more shade than regular basil, but you shouldn’t expect it to develop the best flavor without more sunlight. Like its relatives, it needs plenty of growing space as it also spreads wildly from seed. Another great plant for the brown-thumbed gardener.








PURPLE RUFFLES BASIL This is a great plant to spice up the kitchen and the landscape! Perhaps the most colorful basil for landscapes, purple ruffles makes a great addition to salads and pesto. Similar in color to the dark opal, this plant is slightly smaller in stature (reaches up to 1 ½ feet) and its leaves are very frilly and ruffled. While it can handle a shadier spot in the garden, it still needs at least three hours of sunlight to mature properly. Purple ruffles gives off a combination of licorice and cinnamon scents and produces lavender and pink flowers that can also be eaten. Somewhat difficult to start from seeds, this plants works best from transplants.


RED RUBIN basil is a unique, sweet type of basil that has dark purple leaves. Its flavor is sweet like sweet basil, and is used commonly in salads and as a garnish.



SIAM QUEEN BASIL – Siam queen is a type of Thai basil that produces mint green leaves with very large flower heads – up to 6 inches across – that give off a spicy anise scent. ( it smells great!) It reaches heights up to 2 ½ feet, but it can be pinched back – and even eaten! – to restrict growth.



SPICY GLOBE

Spicy globe basil is similar to the taste of sweet basil. The main difference with this type is that is grows small, dense, and compact, at most 10 inches tall. Spicy globe basil is perfect for pots and small gardens.

You may purchase SPICY GLOBE BASIL from my store!


SWEET BASIL (Ocimum basilicum) is one of the most common and important culinary herbs in the world and is considered the king of herbs. It has been used for thousands of years in Italian dishes. Sweet basil can be used in almost any dish including meat, pizza, pasta, salad, and in sauces.


Basil and tomatoes go together; in the garden as well as in your sandwich. This is used widely in Mediterranean cuisine. Some of the most famous Italian dishes rely for their memorable flavor on this herb.


Also used as an insect repellant or fly repellant. I use equal parts of basil and sage together whenever I

start noticing flies appearing in my kitchen. I mixed the basil and sage together, ( you only need about ½ teaspoon of each) put it on a paper towel ( I've been known to turn the cover of a jar up and put some in it, you can use a small glass dish or custard cup, anything, as long as it is open) near where the flies seem to be and after a few minutes the flies go away. They don't die, so you don't need to worry about dead flies around. They just go away. I have requested that the waitress or cook in restaurants mix this and bring it to the table, when there are flies in the dining area. More than one cook has actually come out and thanked me and said they'll be using this mixture in the kitchen from then on. So,give a try. Even if the kids get in to it, it won't hurt them.





THAI BASIL, used commonly in Thai and Vietnamese cuisines, has a flavor of licorice and mint this annual is also referred to as anise or licorice basil. It reaches heights up to 24 inches and with a nearly two-foot expanse. . It has small green leaves and purple stems. Thai basil goes great with seafood, chicken, pork, and in curry sauces. stir-fried dishes. Thai basil can also be found served raw with pho, which is a soup made of noodles. In Taiwan, Thai basil can be found in the popular Three Cup Chicken dish. Thai basil is more easily found in specialty grocery stores that carry exotic or high-end fresh herbs.

THAI BASIL IS ONE OF THE BASILS THAT I AM GROWING THIS YEAR! Feel free to look in my store for dried THAI BASIL.



There are three common types of basil that are usually found in Thai cuisine.

HORAPHA,

KRAPHAO, and

MAENGLAK.

KRAPHAO IS better known as Thai holy basil while

MAENGLAK is better known as Thai lemon basil.

All three types, though similar, have different and distinct flavors when used in culinary dishes.

THAI HOLY BASIL is widely used in Indian dishes and is even worshiped and smells of cloves.

culinary uses of thai basil

Thai basil is most commonly used and found in chicken, pork, and curry dishes in Thailand and Vietnam.



WILD BASIL ( Calamintha clinopodium) is a species from northern Europe. It has a scent and flavor reminiscent of thyme.




 
 
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