Bountiful Blessings Farm Produce

  (Hinckley, Illinois)
Locally Grown - Quality Farm Produce at Affordable Prices
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Catch Up Day

Today was one of those days when I was finally able to get caught up with a few personal things I needed to do. It has been very busy with picking and maintaining the crop. Our stands have been very busy and the vegetables have been excellent. We received about 6 tenths inches of rain overnight and throughout the day. It is still sprinkling now as I write this. Tomorrow morning I have an appointment and then I will spend the day picking and sorting. We strive diligently to provide our customers with the finest quility vegetables we can give them. One of us inspects every piece that we sell. I do not want to get so big that we are unable to provide such a service and product. It sounds like the weather will be nice tomorrow and Wednesday and then we might get some more rain. I wish these rains would have come last month! Nonetheless, we have been blessed with a great harvest. Stop into one of stands this week for some tasty sweet corn, melons and a large variety of wonderful, healthy, locally grown vegetables. May God bless you this upcoming week.
 
 

Rain Day

We have been working very hard at the Bountiful Blessings Farm in Hinckley, Illinois. Between our farm stands and picking, we have not had a lot of time to do anything. Andy, Peter and George have been picking corn and tomatoes, cabbage, cucumbers, zucchini, yellow and patty pan squash, peppers and much more. Today was the Hinckley Farmer's Market and the Kane County Flea Market. Our stands have been busy this past week. Many people are enjoying our melons and sweet corn. The heirloom tomatoes are coming on and the heirloom peppers are producing a bumper crop. We all hope you are having a great summer and are taking the opportunity to eat some great locally grown food! God bless!

 

Here is the grandkids enjoying some sweet corn!


 
 

Melons!

Today we got our first Sensation melons. They are a totally unique melon. Sensation is a one of a kind variety that has excellent taste, texture, sweetness and aroma. If harvested when the rind is turning from green to yellow, the flesh will be green and white. At this stage the flesh is crisp and sweet and the shelf life is best. When the melons are allowed to fully mature, the flesh will be sweet, pure white and soft. The 5.5-6 lb. fruit have sparse but distinctive netting over green, yellow and orange skin. (Harris Seed). Our customers love this melon. Nonetheless, our cantaloupes are wonderful too! If you stop by one of our stands, give one of the melons a try. 
 
 

'Tis the Season

We have been blessed with an inch and a half of rain this past week. It has been so long since we had rain; I forgot what mud looked like. The family has been busy working the farmer's market, stands and at the farm. We have been busy harvesting tomatoes, sweet corn, potatoes, zucchini, yellow summer squash, onions, and much more. This is my favorite time of year. It is so much fun to see the glow of delight on a person's face when tell us how much they enjoyed a particular vegetable. Please stop in to one of our stands and say hello. May God bless you!
 
 

Hinckley Farmer's Market - June 23rd - First Day

Today was the first Hinckley Farmer's Market for the season. We hope everyone who stopped by will stop in again next weekend for more yummy veggies. Thank you again for support your local farmers and merchants. I also want to thank the Hinckley Fresh Market for allowing us to use their parking lot to hold the market. Moreover, thank you to Nora and James Roderick for all the work they have done to get the market started. It looks like it will be a great season! 

The crops at Bountiful Blessings Farm are doing well, we just need a little rain. I keep praying for rain and I know it will get here soon enough. Thank You Lord for providing us with good weather. I hope all of you are having a great weekend. God Bless! 

 Here is our popcorn patch:

 

 


 
 

Hinckley Farmer's Market - June 23rd

The Hinckley Farmer's Market group met once again last evening to discuss plans for this season's market. The first market will be held on Saturday, June 23rd from nine to noon at the Hinckley Fresh Market parking lot. The market is located at 710 James Street in Hinckley, Illinois. This year everyone is excited as we have several new venders joining us. The market will feature fresh locally grown vegetables, crafts, jellies and jams, flowers, honey, eggs, granola, baked goods, and much more. We are really hoping for a big turnout and anticipate a wonderful year. The market is open each Saturday through September. 

At Bountiful Blessings Farm, we are still planting and maintain the crops already in the field. Dad ran the cultivator yesterday while I planted beans. Today we plan to plant more sweet corn, so it will be a very busy day. The end of the week looks promissing for more planting. I would like to get the balance of the large tomatoes in the field. I will most likely start planting zucchini today. Hope you have a wonderful day. May God richly bless you in Christ Jesus.

 
 

Thankful for the Rain

Today has been kind of slow as I am not feeling the best. I have a terrible cold and chest cough. I guess getting wet and being out in the hot then cold weather got the best of me, I planted more seeds this morning and kept up with the sowing schedule. I do not want to get behind as it is very difficult to get caught up again. Everything looks great after the rain. Our onions are up about two inches and the potatoes are nicely sprouting. It won't be too long and things will be rolling real fast. I want to plant the tomatoes in the high tunnel towards the end of the week or the first part of next week. I am waiting on the weather to stabilize a bit before I gamble again. The same goes for the sweet corn, I want to see what the weather is going to do before I start putting it in the ground. 

After seeding this morning, I cleaned up the garage and pulled some equipment outside. I then did a bunch of paperwork and organization. I am going in the house now to lie down for a little while. The medicine I took is working, making me drowsy. I am very thankful for the rain we received over night and yesterday. This really helped our plantings. May God grant you a wonderful afternoon and evening!

 
 

Getting Ready for the Market

Have you ever had one of those days? Well today has been one of those days for me. I tried so hard to keep on task today, but I had several emergencies that I could not let go without addressing. Anyhow, the day is coming to a close and I am still on schedule with the seeding. I have one variety of seed that needs to be reseeded. Germination was only about 50% and then they damped off. On the next batch I am going to watch it real close. Not to say that I was negligent the first time, but I am going to be more cautious not to make any mistakes. I use a bleach solution to sterilize the seeding trays and I use quality seed, so I am not sure what went wrong. I added more ventilation in the seed room thinking that there might not be enough air movement. Hopefully, this will correct the issue. 

Tonight, my wife and I are heading to a meeting for the Hinckley Farmer's Market. We are excited about the upcoming season and hope it will even be more successful than last year. Nora Gubbins and Christy Bark are doing an excellent job in organizing the market. For more information about the market, be sure to check out the website at  http://www.localharvest.org/hinckley-farmers-market-M49935

There is also a link to the Facebook page for the market.

 
 

Cold in Illinois

Another cold and blustery day here in Illinois. However, it is supposed to warm up. Yesterday was very productive. Due to a snow day, my nephew, Andy came out and helped me most of the day. The day started with my daughter going into the ditch with her car and daddy attempting to rescue her. By the time I was able to get there, someone else pulled her out. That was so nice of them! When I got back to the farm, I started seeding tomatoes, onions and cauliflower. The season has officially begun! Andy worked on a few projects I had lined up for him and he did such a great job! I am blessed to have such a super family! There is still a lot more preparation work to be completed, but things are moving right along.

Today is the Grundy county auction. I'm not sure yet if I am going or not. My back is bothering me and I am not sure I can stand around in the cold for fear it would just agitate my back even more. My wife went to town for her normal Saturday morning coffee at her brother's house, so I will probably work in the seed room and get somewhat more organized. It was so wonderful to walk into the seed room this morning and smell the damp soil and feel the warmth when it is only 17 degrees outside. It won't be too long and seeds will start popping through the top layer of soil. How exciting is that? Another miracle! Bountiful Blessings is growing once again! Thank you God!

 
 

Continued Preparations

As you can probably tell from recent blogs, I do a lot of research. I think it is important to be on top of the game with a bit of knowledge before ramrodding into a project. When I was a firefighter, one of the things I was taught, was that preparation is probably the most important thing one can do to be successful. I have taken that principle to heart in other areas of my life and it seems to hold true. With that being said, I have been preparing for weeks for the spring season which has involved research, reading, making lists and repairing machinery. Yesterday, my computer went out and I had to take it to the shop for repairs; so I was able to do a little reading in between working on some things in the shop. Moreover, as I was working in the shop, I started thinking about fertilizers again, and I thought I would do some more studying to determine what types I will use and how they will be applied.

The kind of fertilizer used has a noticeable influence on the character and quality of the vegetables produced. For the garden, only fertilizers that have been carefully prepared should be used. Fertilizers of organic composition, such as chicken manure, should go through the composting stage before being used.

In my opinion, for garden crops, there is no fertilizer that will compare with good, well-rotted manure. In selecting manure for the garden, care should be taken that it does not contain any element that will be injurious to the soil. An excess of sawdust or shavings used as bedding will have a tendency to produce sourness in the soil. Chicken, manure ranks high as fertilizer, and its value is somewhat greater than ordinary barnyard manures, and almost as great as some of the lower grades of commercial fertilizers. The manure from chickens is especially good for dropping in the hills or rows of plants.

As I mentioned above, planning and preparation are very important to success. In my opinion there is an infinite variety of places for the start of a garden. In particular, the beginning is in the mind, and from that source of schemes come forth the speculative layout and specifications. And this is a big task. I am trying to layout the entire garden plot on paper and I'm finding out that no matter how hard I work, it is easier said than done to see everything in order. I guess it will all come together. So, back to the drawing board!!


 
 

Seed Orders

Getting Ready

Well it's that time of year at the farm where I look over last year's records and plan for the upcoming season. Actually, I have been planning for weeks, but I am finally mapping out the ground and preparing seed orders. I never realized there is so much work involved with a produce business! One cannot imagine the amount of planning that it takes to get everything in order. So, with my pile of catalogs, records and projections, I am making a master plan for this season's crop. I enjoy looking through the catalogs and seeing what is new, but it is just as exciting to see some of the heirloom varieties that look so inviting and interesting. I think of how it was back in the day and how much more work it took to grow a crop. Nonetheless, when a person bites into a Black Krim tomato or tries their first Moon and Stars watermelon, they get a sense of that old timey pleasure of eating something that folks enjoyed many, many years ago. I am also working on a hotbed and cold frame to extend the season; trying to provide locally grown vegetables earlier in the season. Many people are already asking me when they can get their first tomato! Well, it's still a bit early! Back to the seed order!

 
 

Another Year of Bountiful Blessings

Even though the business started in 2011, Bountiful Blessings brings a lot of experience to the table. The Wielert family has been involved in agriculture and horticulture for four generations. Ranging from cattle production, greenhouse operation and vegetable farming over the years, the Wielerts have been described by friends and neighbors as quality growers. Located five miles north of Hinckley, Illinois on McGirr Road, Wielert's Bountiful Blessings Farm Produce is situated on some of Illinois' most bountiful farm land. In the spring of 2011, after being prompted by his father, Jeff Wielert opened Bountiful Blessings Farm Produce to provide locally produced food in the local market. Jeff's parents, Allan and Bette Wielert help him to produce a top quality vegetable crop available on the farm and at other local sites. Their goal is to bring a healthy, delicious product to your table at an affordable price.

In 2012, Bountiful Blessings will be expanding to meet the needs of the local area. With over 10 acres of sweet corn and 10 acres of vegetables and pumpkins, Bountiful Blessings will continue to offer a top quality food product at affordable prices. Be sure to visit the farm or one of their stands this spring!


 
 
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