Home Farm Herbery

  (Munfordville, Kentucky)
Home Farm Herbery Blog
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Let me create a hand painted personalized tile for your home or farm today.

"Welcome to L a Dolce Vita Farm”© is a  hand painted  tile by award winning International artist, Arlene Wright-Correll. 


It is 11 inches by 14 inches and this one is sold. 

Let me make a personalized welcome sign for your home.  It comes with a leather hanging strap to hang anywhere inside or outside your home or garden.  Order now and you will have it within 8-10 business days.  I can do just about any kind of design as long as you have a camera ready photo.

It comes with an artist signed, dated and numbered Certificate of Authenticity and an artist bio.

Gallery price is $89.00. It will be hand painted especially for you, carefully packaged, insured and shipped FREE (within the Continental US)to you within 3-5 business days of receipt of funds. HI, Al, PR, VI & Canada add $10.00 extra for the shipping.

Buy this hand painted tile today as all the proceeds from the sale goes to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

Gallery representation: All images on this web site are original works of art created by Arlene Wright-Correll. Images may appear different on your computer screen than actual artwork.

Click here to order yours today.
 
 

Melon (Cantaloupe), Honey Rock (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) For Sale


Melon (Cantaloupe), Honey Rock (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) For Sale

 


At Home Farm Herbery we discovered one of our best sellers to be the Honey Rock Cantaloupe Melon.  The Honey Rock melon produces a very sweet and delicious fruit that matures to six 6 inches in diameter!


85-100 days to Maturity

 

20 Seed Sampler Packet $5.99   We only have 4 Sampler packets this season so buy it before someone else does and we will ship it free to you plus we will send you a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice with your order and we will toss in some free planting guidelines for many things. 

 

Buy now and we think you will agree that this will easily become one of your favorite melons to grow and most assuredly to eat!

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


 

Melon Cantaloupe (Hales Best Jumbo) (Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) For Sale


Melon Cantaloupe (Hales Best Jumbo) (Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) For Sale

 


At Home Farm Herbery we all agree that there seems to be nothing better than sinking our teeth into one of these Hales Best Jumbo Cantaloupe Melons.  These seeds, last year, were yielding large, oval, ribbed fruits weighing up to 5 to 6 pounds, thus making this cantaloupe is a traditional favorite (at least around here).

We advise you to use heavy netting and you will be rewarded with some fine textured, bright orange flesh jumbo melons that holds a sweet flavor.

Plus these beauties are very drought tolerant!



85-100 days to Maturity

 

20 Seed Sampler Packet $5.99   We only have 4 Sampler packets this season so buy it before someone else does and we will ship it free to you plus we will send you a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice with your order and we will toss in some free planting guidelines for many things.  Buy now and we think you will agree that this will be a hard melon to beat.

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


 

Melon Honeydew Green Flesh (Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) For Sale


Melon Honeydew Green Flesh (Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) For Sale

 


Last season at Home Farm Herbery these seeds produced some very delicious melons with the most marvelous sweet green flesh. This seed will produce large 6 1/2 x 6 inch melons that will weigh about 5 lbs.


85-100 days to Maturity

 

20 seed Sampler Packet $4.99   We only have 1 Sampler packet this season so buy it before someone else does and we will ship it free to you plus we will send you a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice with your order and we will toss in some free planting guidelines for many things.  Buy now and we think this is a great project for a young farmer to grow.

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


 

Watermelon Orange Flesh Seeds (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) for sale


Watermelon Orange Flesh Seeds (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) for sale

 


Everyone at Home Farm Herbery loves to sink their teeth into this orange watermelon with its amazing flavor and extremely sweet taste.   We all agreed that this Orange Flesh watermelon is a must have for every home garden so do not miss out and buy yours today. 


85 days to Maturity


The best months to plant is between April and June since watermelons are heat-loving plants that need lots of sun. They grow on a long vine, so make sure to give them plenty of space to roam around.

 

15 seed Sampler Packet $4.99   we only have 4 Sampler packets this season so buy yours today and we will ship it free to you plus we will send you a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice with your order.  Buy now and we think this is a great project for a young farmer to grow.

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


 
 
 

Tomato Pineapple (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) Seeds for Sale


Tomato Pineapple (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) Seeds for Sale

 


At Home Farm Herbery last year we found that the Pineapple tomato plant produced good yields of extra large 2 lb yellow tomatoes with red streaks both on the outside and inside.  Plus we found them to be very flavorful!

 

We loved this huge yellow tomato and many of them weighed over 2 lbs! Another plus for this tomato is that the plant will continue to bear fruit all season long and these two features make it a very, very popular heirloom variety that is a good money maker at your local farmers market.

80-90 days to Maturity

 

15 seed Sampler Packet $5.99   We only have 2 Sampler packets this season so buy yours today and we will ship it free to you plus we will send you a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice with your order.  Buy now and we think you will be glad you did.

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital


 

Tomato Jubilee (100% Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) Seeds for sale


Tomato Jubilee (100% Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) Seeds for sale

 


When you want a meaty, low-acid tomato with lots of vitamin A and C then this very popular variety is for you. 

 

At Home Farm Herbery we found this large delicious yellow tomato with a very meaty interior not only easy to grow, but it was high yielding.
 
Only 75-80 days to Maturity and we think you will enjoy not only growing this beauty, but serving this healthy tomato to your family.

 

20 seed Sampler Packet $4.99   We only have 4 Sampler packets this season so buy yours today and we will ship it free to you plus we will send you a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice with your order.  Buy now and we think you will be glad you did.

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital


 

Tomato Green Striped Zebra (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) Seeds for sale


Tomato Green Striped Zebra (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) Seeds for sale

 

At Home Farm Herbery we love this tomato because the Green Striped Zebra tomato plant produces medium sized 3 oz. green tomatoes with dark green stripes. Not only fun to grow this is a popular old fashioned heirloom tomato with excellent flavor and it stays green as it matures. This is what we call a something special tomato and it is excellent for salads, sandwiches, pickling, and sauces

 

75-80 days to Maturity

 

Unfortunately we only have 2 Sampler packets this season simply because we sold out just about all our plants at our local farmers market last season and only had a couple for ourselves so buy yours today and we will ship it free to you plus we will send you a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice with your order.  Buy now and we think you will be glad you did.

 

15 seed Sampler Packet $5.99  

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital


 

Tomato Cherry Chocolate (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) Seeds for sale


Tomato Cherry Chocolate (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) Seeds for sale

 


Last season at Home Farm Herbery our Cherry Chocolate tomato plants produced high yields of 1" diameter chocolate cherry tomatoes growing in clusters of 8 and they gave us a high yield of tomatoes on one plant.

 

We liked the fact that these tomatoes are crack resistant and hold very well on the plant plus we are sort of theatrical around Home Farm and they are picture perfect making them an excellent variety for any gourmet dish and ensuring great conversational comments among our guests. 

 

We also think they have great flavor and we know they are very easy to grow so if you have not try them order them right now.

Only 75 days to Maturity

 

20 seed Sampler Packet $5.99   We only have 4 Sampler packets this season so buy yours today and we will ship it free to you plus we will send you a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice with your order.  Buy now and we think you will be glad you did.

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


 

Tomato, Cherokee Purple (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) Seeds for sale


Tomato, Cherokee Purple (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO) Seeds for sale

 


This rare variety has been grown for over 100 years by the Cherokee Indians. The Cherokee Purple tomato plant produces high yields of 6 oz. - 12 oz sized purplish/pink colored heirloom tomatoes.

At Home Farm Herbery when we served this tomato to our guests they all agreed it was a very sweet with wonderful rich flavor.  As it grows and matures the skin turns to a dark pinkish purple color with a hint of green around the top. 

We found it very easy to grow and we found it extremely flavorful.

90 days to Maturity

 

At Home Farm Herbery we love this tomato and so did our customers when we took some plants to our local Farmers Market last season..

 

15 seed Sampler Packet $4.99 and we only have 3 Sampler packets this season. So buy yours today and we will ship it free to you plus we will send you a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice with your order.  Buy now.

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital


 

Tomato, Black Krim (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO)


Tomato, Black Krim (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO)

 


The Black Krim tomato produces high yields of dark reddish/black beefsteak tomatoes. This is a popular and rare heirloom tomato variety from the Black Sea region of Russia.

 

Amazingly rich in flavor- Skin turns to a reddish black color as it matures - Interior is dark reddish green - Very sweet - Excellent when eaten right off the vine, used for salads or sandwiches - Easy to grow and looks amazing in any culinary dish.

 

75-80 days to maturity

 

At Home Farm Herbery each year so far to date every seed has produced a beautiful tomato plant!  We love this tomato and so did our customers when we took some plants to our local Farmers Market.

 

15 seed Sampler Packet $4.99 and we only have 5 Sampler packets this season. So buy yours today and we will ship it free to you plus we will send you a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice with your order.  Buy now.

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital


 

Women's Freedom Tea



 


At Home Farm Herbery we enjoy creating teas and sometimes we have a limited supply of them.

 

Our Women's Freedom Tea is a liberating, enjoyable, and flavorful herbal decoction designed specifically for harmonizing and balancing women of all ages.

 

This tasty combination of roots and spices brews a grounding and soothing cup perfect for every day and it contains: organic Licorice root, organic Fennel seed, organic Star Anise, organic Sarsaparilla root, organic Ginger root, organic Dandelion root, organic Cinnamon bark, organic Dong Quai root, organic Orange peel, organic Burdock root, and organic Cramp Bark.

 

We have put it up in 4 oz packets and it comes complete with instructions on the correct way to brew and enjoy loose tea.

 

4 ounce package $15.94 make approx. 40 to 50+ cups of tea at the low cost of 30 to 37 cents per cup for the best tea you will ever taste.

 

Buy today and get free shipping plus all orders come with a free complimentary gift of a herb or seasoning blend of our choice.

 

Right now we have only 6 packages to sell so buy yours today.

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


 
 
 

The Yeast Also Rises©

The Yeast Also Rises©

by Arlene Wright-Correll
Home Farm Herbery




The other morning I had two ladies come to Home Farm Herbery kitchen to learn how to make bread the quick and easy way and we had a grand time including a lot of questions.

One of the questions was about the type of yeast to buy and were there any differences between yeast.



I made a lot of different types of bread including crusty European Artisan bread which I sell at our local farmers market 3 times a week and take to special customers who cannot leave their offices during the work hours. It is a great hobby and it allows me to send the net proceeds to my favorite charity which happens to be St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Well to get back to the yeast questions it got me thinking about it as an article. One of the questions asked is there a difference between instant, RapidRise and bread machine yeast? Instant machine yeast and bread machine yeast are the same yeast. RapidRise, Fleischmann’s branded instant yeast, is also instant yeast, but a different strain than SAF or Red Star. Over the years I have used all of them including making bread the hard way so many years ago that I bought cubes of compacted yeast and kept it in the freezer.



I have found that RapidRise is faster out of the gate than SAF or Red Star, but gives out sooner. Since I make my dough in batches that make 4 loaves at a time and I make it 24 hours before I use it because I like to have my dough leisurely rise. The reason is two fold, a long rise brings out bread’s flavor and my batches of dough can sit for up to 14 days in the refrigerator until I use it up, I happen to like SAF/Red Star yeast.

Another question was, “Can I use active dry and instant yeasts interchangeably?”

The answer is yes they can be substituted for one another although I have found that active dry yeast is a little bit slower to rise than instant, as far as dough rising goes. However, in a long rise such as one that lasts from 2 to 3 hours, the active dry yeast catches up.

So just figure it this way. When you have a recipe using instant yeast and it calls for the dough to “double in size, about 1 hour,” you should be prepared to add 15 to 20 minutes to this time if you’re using active dry yeast.

Dough is judged by how much it’s risen, not how long it takes. Many different things effect the rising of dough such as cold weather, low barometric pressure, how hot my kitchen is when I bake, and tons of other factors affect dough rising times. Just remember to use them as a guide, not an unbreakable rule.



Bread baking involves living things (yeast), your own personal touch in kneading technique, and the atmosphere of your kitchen which includes the size of it, is it a small space or a large space like mine is and when my ceiling fans are revolving the time is longer and when my kitchen is hot from a lot of baking the rising time is shorter thus making many variables that it’s almost impossible to say that the dough will double in size in 60 minutes should you have a recipe that says something like that.



I have, over the years, discovered that baking with yeast is a combination of art, science and a bit of magic and I no longer use the kneading method, I just mix by hand, let is sit in its tubs, I stay flexible and everything seems just fine.

Going from the old time methods of making 8 loves at a time when we had farm hands or lots of kids to feed to going down to just 2 of us I changed to a bread machine and that is the one time when you might not want to use instant and active dry yeasts interchangeably. Bread machines use a higher temperature to raise dough, substituting instant for active dry yeast usually causes bread to over-rise, then collapse. If you do not have bread machine yeast and you need to substitute instant yeast for active dry, reduce the amount of instant yeast by 25% when you add it to your bread machine.



Another question asked was, “How much yeast is in a “packet” of yeast?”

A packet used to include 1 tablespoon of yeast now it is closer to 2 generous teaspoons since companies have improved manufacturing methods that produce stronger, more active yeast.



Another question was, “Exactly what does yeast do?”

The answer is quite simple, yeast makes bread rise. Whereas baking soda and baking powder make your muffins and cakes rise, yeast makes breads of all kinds rise. Sandwich bread, dinner rolls, pizza crust, artisan hearth breads and just about any kind of bread you can name such as this wonderful Ciabatta hearth baked bread I make.



In order to work yeast needs a good supply of oxygen and it stops reproducing once it’s in bread dough. When it is in the bread dough it starts to eat sugar (sucrose and fructose) first; once that’s gone, yeast converts the starch in flour into sugar; thus flour is capable of providing yeast with a continuous food source.

CO2, alcohol, and organic acids are the byproducts of feeding yeast. CO2 released by yeast is trapped in bread dough’s elastic web of gluten just like blowing up a balloon. Alcohol and organic acids disperse throughout the dough, enhancing baked bread’s flavor and as long as moisture and food are available, yeast will continue to eat and produce CO2, alcohol, and organic acids. If your bread stops rising, it’s usually not because the yeast isn’t working or has died and that is because the gluten has somehow become “leaky,” failing to retain CO2.

Along the way of writing this article I looked up the dictionary’s definition of yeast and it said that yeast is a single-cell organism, part of the fungi kingdom. The yeast we use most often today, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is one of the oldest domesticated organisms known to mankind: it’s been helping humans bake bread and brew alcohol for thousands of years. Fittingly, the Latin translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is “sweet fungi of beer.”

My research went on to tell me that Saccharomyces cerevisiae is just one strain of the more than 1,500 identified species of yeast. I went on to discover that those 1,500 identified yeasts are just an estimated 1% of the yeast population in the world; most species remain as yet unnamed.

So in order to have a reliable supply of yeast on hand for all of our baking needs, it was necessary for manufacturers to “domesticate” wild yeast thus stabilizing it, and in the process making it 200 times stronger than its wild counterpart. Now plant scientists who work with a yeast manufacturer identify certain characteristics of wild yeast that they decide are desirable; isolate them, and then replicate them. The resulting yeast is given a “training” diet to make it reproduce. Formerly based on molasses, most manufacturers now feed their growing yeast with corn syrup. Once the cells have replicated to a critical mass – a process that generally takes about a week – they’re filtered, dried, packaged, and sent off to the market where you and I buy it to make wonderful, healthy bread providing we use organic, unbleached flour, providing that anything we add to the bread also is chemical-free, organic and healthy.

Tread the Earth Lightly



Arlene Wright-Correll

Home Farm Herbery

http://www.localharvest.org/store/M48630
 
 

Everything You Wanted to Know About Carrots and More©

Everything You Wanted to Know About Carrots and More©

by Arlene Wright-Correll
Home Farm Herbery




The green thumb is twitching at Home Farm Herbery and those of us who have a greenhouse or hot beds or even sunny window sills are starting our seeds indoors and during our spare time we peruse the many seed catalogs that come in about this time of year.

Carrots are not sown indoors, but the pictures always look good in those catalogs. Yet many of us often decide not to plant them because they are one of the supermarkets cheapest veggies offered. However, they are also one of those year round root vegetables that come about 3000 miles from the west coast to get to the east coast and they are usually grown by big farms that use a lot of pesticides or even chemically engineered seeds.



Carrots can easily be grown in small gardens. I prefer the raised bed method, filled with fertile well-worked soil and about two weeks before our last frost date I sow some carrots. If you live in cool climates you can continue planting every three weeks until midsummer. Then towards the end of summer you can begin to sow seeds for fall and winter carrots 10 to 12 weeks before your average first fall frost.

When you are ready to plant and if you have raised beds make sure that the soil is at least 12 inches deep. You start by loosening the soil and thoroughly mixing in about 1 inch of mature compost or your organic fertilizer. This year I am going to get some worms to do my composting and try making vermicompost.

Prepare the planting bed by loosening the soil to at least 12 inches deep. Thoroughly mix in a 1-inch layer of mature compost or a half-inch layer of vermicompost which what earthworms leave behind and you can be sure this is great compost for carrots.

When you sow your seeds make sure you sow them about a quarter inch deep and 2 inches apart, in rows spaced at least 10 inches apart since carrots do well in double or triple rows. As the seedlings come up thin your seedlings to 4 to 6 inches apart, depending on the variety’s mature size.

I love all kinds of carrots and especially the kinds that are hard to find in our local markets. Here at Home Farm Herbery we sort of specialize in “dickering” around with organic and heirloom carrots and grow several different kinds and we also sell the seeds that come from them.

One of my personal favorite is the Paris Market Carrot (Daucus carota) which is a Nineteenth-century French heirloom. These are early round red-orange carrots, growing 1-2" in diameter, uniform and very sweet. I like the fact that it does well in shallow or rocky soil and it even can be grown in containers. These carrots are highly sought after by gourmet restaurants and a great seller at markets. They mature in 50-68 days. Consider getting some seed for your child and let them have a nice project growing some of these cuties in a big container.



Another carrot we have had good experience with is the Danvers Heirloom Carrot produces 7 to 7 ½ inches long, 2 to 2 ½ inches across carrots that taper to blunt and they are uniform interior color. We thought they were very tender and very sweet. This carrot stores well. Since a lot of our soil in KY is clay we know this does an outstanding job in heavier soils. It takes about 70 days to Maturity.



Another fun carrot to grow is the Little Finger variety is very early carrot that grows 4 inch cylindrical roots. Tender, sweet midget variety can be densely planted and they mature in 55 days. This is also a great carrot for a kid’s container project.



The Scarlet Nantes Carrot (Daucus carota) (aka Early Coreless) is another easy to grow carrot. It is an heirloom carrot and dates to the 1850s as its original seed was developed by Vilmorin in France. These carrots have cylindrical roots which are 7" long with blunt tips. It has a fine-grained bright red-orange flesh which is nearly coreless. We enjoy its great flavor which is sweet and brittle. These are really good when used as baby carrots. We found them to be excellent for freezing and juicing. Plus this carrot is widely adapted and stores well. It matures in 65-75 days.

Once you have sown and grown your carrots and let us not forget weeding, it will soon be time to harvest your spring-sown carrots and you simply pull or dig them when the roots reach mature size and show rich color. You will find that the taste improves as carrots mature. However, do not leave mature carrots in warm soil any longer than necessary. I have found that raised beds help to eliminate the many critters such as the hundreds of rabbits who live rent free at Home Farm Herbery and who like carrots.

If you sow carrots in the late summer to mature in cool fall soil, these can be left in the ground longer, but dig them out before the ground freezes to preserve their quality.



Always remove the carrot tops, leaving about a half inch of the green part to prevent moisture loss, rinse clean, and store in a refrigerator or cold root cellar. All the varieties I have mentioned will keep for several months in the bottom drawer of your fridge. Carrots also may be canned, pickled, dried or frozen. We even dehydrate them here at Home Farm Herbery. They are great to throw into soups.

Carrots are really good raw and great steamed; just don’t cook the heck out of them or any veggie for that matter. All veggies have good and bad points and here are the ones for carrots.

The good point is that carrots are very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. They are also a good source of Thiamin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate and Manganese, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K and Potassium. One serving of carrots has between 25 and 50 calories depending on the size serving or whether you add things to them.

The bad point is that a large portion of the calories in carrots come from sugars.

Did you know that carrots can be traced back about 5,000 years through historical documents and art work? No one seems to know exactly when the first carrots appeared because many people mistook them for parsnips, a close relative of the carrot.

When we think of carrots we tend to think of them as only being orange, but they can also be white, yellow, red, and purple.



For those of you who are Bugs Bunny fans you may be surprised to learn that Mel Blanc, the voice of the iconic cartoon character Bugs Bunny, reportedly did not like carrots!

Last but not least let us not forget Carrot Cake!



Carrot cake is always a favorite at Home Farm and one of the best carrot cake recipes is a Betty Crocker recipe that I have been using for years and I will share it with you.

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

3 large eggs

2 cups sugar

3/4 cup vegetable oil

3/4 cup buttermilk

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

2 cups grated carrot

1 (8-ounce) can crushed pineapple, drained

1 (3 1/2-ounce) can flaked coconut

1 cup chopped pecans or walnuts

Buttermilk Glaze or Cream Cheese Frosting (see below)



Preparation

Line 3 (9-inch) round cake pans with wax paper; lightly grease and flour wax paper. Set pans aside.

Stir together first 4 ingredients.

Beat eggs and next 4 ingredients at medium speed with an electric mixer until smooth. Add flour mixture, beating at low speed until blended. Fold in carrot and next 3 ingredients. Pour batter into prepared cake pans.

Bake at 350° for 25 to 30 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean.

Drizzle Buttermilk Glaze evenly over layers; cool in pans on wire racks 15 minutes. Remove from pans, and cool completely on wire racks. Spread Cream Cheese Frosting between layers and on top and sides of cake.

Here is the recipe for the Buttermilk Glaze that I found in Southern Living in 1997.

1 cup sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda

1/2 cup buttermilk

1/2 cup butter or margarine

1 tablespoon light corn syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preparation

Bring first 5 ingredients to a boil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Boil, stirring often, 4 minutes. Remove from heat, and stir in vanilla.

Here is the recipe for the cream cheese frosting that I also found in Southern Living in 1997.

Ingredients

3/4 cup butter or margarine, softened

1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened

1 (3-ounce) package cream cheese, softened

3 cups sifted powdered sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Preparation

Beat butter and cream cheese at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Add powdered sugar and vanilla; beat until smooth.

I guess by now you know I really like carrots and I even like to paint pictures of them when I work in my art studio.



Tread the Earth Lightly



Arlene Wright-Correll

Get your Organic, Heirloom carrot seeds at Home Farm Herbery today.

http://www.localharvest.org/store/M48630
 
 

Cucumbers and Tarragon, a Nifty Combination©

Cucumbers and Tarragon, a Nifty Combination©

by Arlene Wright-Correll
Home Farm Herbery




We all know how to prepare cucumbers. When our organic garden starts producing lots of them we put them in salads, we prepare pickles, we make relish, we eat them raw, we have cucumber sandwiches and we start to give them away to anyone who will take a few off our hands.

However, have you ever made soup with them? No! Why not? You can eat it hot or cold and either way it has the most delicate of flavor.

I used to serve this at our restaurant on the river at Laurel Creek Lodge when we owned it. It was quite a hit, especially to the Appalachian hikers coming off the trail to stay in our hostels.

Cucumbers are mostly water and their nutritional value includes sodium, iron, Vitamins A and C, plus Calcium which was all things these hikers needed after spending 3 to 6 months on the Appalachian Trail eating mostly trail food.

Arlene's Elegant Cucumber and Tarragon Soup.

This soup serves 8, but you can halve it easily to serve 4 or you can serve half of it hot one meal and 24 hours later serve the other half chilled at another meal.

Using vegetable stock when I have it or water when I do not, I put 9 cups of either into a large sauce pan adding 2 peeled and chopped large cucumbers, 2 medium sized onion chopped, 2 cloves of peeled garlic and 8 to 10 sprigs of fresh tarragon. I bring this all to a boil and simmer for about 15 minutes and once the cucumbers are tender, I remove the pan from heat, allow cooling slightly and then carefully pouring this warm mixture into my blender or food processor. I now puree it all and then pour it back into my saucepan and bring back to a boil and then let stay warm over medium to low heat.

Taking a small bowl I mix 2 tablespoons of cornstarch with 1/3 cup of light cream until smooth. Now I add 1 cup of light cream to this mixture and gently pour into the soup, stirring constantly over medium heat until the soup thickens.

Now I add about 8 springs of chopped fresh tarragon, or 2 tsp. of Home Farm Herbery Organic dried tarragon,



2 tablespoons of lemon juice, some freshly grated nutmeg, a pinch of salt and some freshly ground pepper stir gently.

I serve this immediately if I am serving it hot and any I am serving chilled I transfer to a bowl and store covered in my refrigerator.

"Tread the Earth Lightly" and in the meantime… May your day be filled with…Peace, Light and Love



Arlene Wright-Correll

Home Farm Herbery

Where you can get the best organic dried tarragon all year round. http://www.localharvest.org/tarragon-french-organic-C25245

Author's note: This article was originally written for GreenThumbArticles.com

 
 
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