Home Farm Herbery

  (Munfordville, Kentucky)
Home Farm Herbery Blog
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Our culinary yellow mustard seed is the best you can buy and use. Order today.


Mustard Seed Yellow

 Yellow mustard seed is also known as white mustard seed

 At Home Farm Herbery we have carefully selected our organic, chemical-free mustard seed and have just finished this year’s harvest.  For those of you who remember their bible the Parable of the Mustard Seed is a well known parable from the Gospels of Luke.

Ingredients: Organic Yellow Mustard Seed

Taste and Aroma: Hot, but not as hot as brown mustard seed.

Uses: Vegetables, sauerkraut and pickling.

Substitutes: Brown Mustard Seed, Brown Mustard Seed Crushed, Mustard Powder or Pickling Spice

 1 oz package is $3.95

2 oz package is $5.99

16 oz. package $24.95

Larger sizes upon request 

Buy today and we ship free plus we will send you a free, complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice.

 
We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


 
 
 

Home Farm Herbery's featured deals of the week


Sesame Seed Dip Mix

 


 

Za'atar Seasoning

 

 

Za'atar seasoning will open a whole new culinary world for you. Order some for your pantry today and get a free recipe card, free shipping and a free herb blend of our choice.  

 

Turkey & Chicken Stuffing Blend

 

 

Home Farm Herbery’s magic Turkey & Chicken StuffingBlend made the day you order it so buy now!

Home Farm Herbery Bouquet Garni will make you a great chef in your own kitchen.

Make your life easy with this crock pot bag of magic!

Home Farm Herbery Bouquet Garni ½ oz. (14 grams) Just enough for your average soup, stew or crock pot recipe. Buy it now.

 

 

Women’s Freedom Tea is our featured tea this week.
 
 

 Our Women’s Freedom Tea is a liberating, enjoyable, and flavorful herbal decoction designed specifically for harmonizing and balancing women of all ages.
 
Order a 6-7 cup sampler for only $6.95 today and get free shipping and a free herb or herb blend of our choice.
 
 
 

Mustard Seed from Home Farm Herbery is organic and chemical free


Mustard Seed

 

Yellow mustard seed is also known as white mustard seed

 At Home Farm Herbery we have carefully selected our organic, chemical-free mustard seed and have just finished this year’s harvest.  For those of you who remember their bible the Parable of the Mustard Seed is a well known parable from the Gospels of Luke.

Ingredients: Yellow Mustard Seed

Taste and Aroma: Hot, but not as hot as brown mustard seed.

Uses: Vegetables, sauerkraut and pickling.

Substitutes: Brown Mustard Seed, Brown Mustard Seed Crushed, Mustard Powder or Pickling Spice


1 oz package is $3.95

2 oz package is $5.99

Buy today and we ship free plus we will send you a free, complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice.

 We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


 
 
 

How to grow bee balm with Home Farm Herbery Bee Balm Heirloom Seeds


Bee Balm Heirloom Seeds - Wild Bergamot Seed

 

Bee balm, also called monarda, is a flowering herb with a long history as a medicinal and

plant. American colonists used it to make tea, and Native Americans used it to treat colds and sore throats. It has a pleasing scent that is used to make potpourri and sachets. The flowers are edible and sometimes added to summer salads. 


Famous for its beauty and its fragrance, Bee Balm, also know as Wild Bergamot, is an old flower garden favorite. At Home Farm Herbery Bee Balm is one of the best attractors of beneficial butterflies, hummingbirds, and bees.  All in all, Bee Balm is a “must” for any garden.

 

Approx. 100 Seed Pkt. $9.79 with free shipping and each order comes with a free complimentary herb or herb blend of our choice so buy yours today. Plus all our seeds come with special planting instruction sheets and other free goodies we can think of. So Buy today and you will be glad you did.

 

We thank you in advance for your purchase as all our net proceeds go to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

 

 
Once you have received your bee balm seeds here are the instructions.
 
How to Grow Bee Balm
 
  1. Choose a spot to grow bee balm that is in full sun to part shade. The soil should be moist and rich, and if possible, in the lower neutral range of the pH scale, approximately 6.5.
  2. Prepare the planting site. Spread a one-inch layer of compost on the surface of the soil. Turn over the soil using a garden spade and dig to the depth of the spade. Rake the surface of the soil smooth when finished digging.
  3. Sow seeds by scattering or broadcasting them on the surface of the soil. Cover the seeds with a 1/8- to 1/4-inch layer of vermiculite. Firm the surface of the soil gently with your hand.
  4. Water the seedbed with a fine mist using a hose-end sprayer. Monitor the seedbed daily and mist as needed to keep the seedbed moist until the bee balm seeds germinate in about seven to 14 days. Thereafter, water with the equivalent of one inch of rainfall per week.
  5. Thin the seedlings when they are two to three inches high so that they stand eight to 12 inches apart.
  6. Mulch the seedbed with a two-inch layer of buckwheat hulls or shredded bark.
  7. Fertilize the bee balm by putting down a ½- to one-inch layer of compost in the Pull back the mulch and spread compost around the base of the plant. Replace the mulch.
  8. Cut the dried foliage down in late fall after it is killed by frost and apply a protective winter mulch of hay or straw eight to 12 inches deep.
 
 

Everything You Wanted to Know About Dill Weed and Then Some©

Everything You Wanted to Know About Dill Weed and Then Some©

by Arlene Wright-Correll
Home Farm Herbery




Dill weed is a really unique perennial herbal plant that we grow at Home Farm Herbery not only for its leaves, but also for its seeds since both are used as a seasoning and then of course we also let some go to seed to share it with our on-line store friends. Dill is a member of the Umbelliferae family, a large group of flowering herbs and spices, which include caraway, parsley, cumin, fennel, etc.

Technically and botanically it belongs within the family of Apiaceae, of the genus: Anethumand scientifically named as Anethum graveolens for all you Latin Lovers and I mean the language.

Dill is a native of the Mediterranean and East European regions and has been used in preparation of many popular dishes in Mediterranean and European cuisine since ancient times. The Dill plant requires warm summer climates with well-drained fertile soil to flourish. We gave it a warm sunny spot and amended our Kentucky clay with a lot of gravel. It seems to love it as it grows from 1 to 2 feet in height and features dark-green leaves (sprigs) that are wispy and fern-like, have a soft texture with rich pleasant aroma and sweet taste.



Dill seeds, used as spice, are similar in taste and appearance to caraway seeds and often we make dill rye bread and caraway rye bread. Dill seeds feature light brown color, oval shape with vertical ridges and flavor that is aromatic, sweet, and citrus, but they are also slightly bitter in taste.



There are quite a lot of health benefits to Dill and they include being low in calories and contain no cholesterol while containing contains many anti-oxidants, vitamins like niacin, pyridoxine, etc., and dietary fibers, which help to control blood cholesterol levels. Of course dill weed contains numerous plant derived chemical compounds that are known to have been anti-oxidant, disease preventing, and health promoting properties.

It is also rich in many vital vitamins, including folic acid, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin A, ß-carotene, vitamin-C that is essential for optimum metabolism inside the human body.

As a 21 year cancer survivor I am always interested in healthy information and especially the qualities of culinary herbs such as Dill because Vitamin-A and beta carotene are natural flavonoid antioxidants. 100 grams of dill weed sprigs provide 7718 IU or 257% of recommended-daily levels of this vitamin. Vitamin A is also required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for good eye-sight. Consumption of natural foods rich in flavonoids helps the human body to protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.

The sprigs of the dill leaves and its seeds contain many essential volatile oils such as d-carvone, dillapiol, DHC, eugenol, limonene, terpinene and myristicin. My research shows that the essential oil, Eugenol in the dill has been in therapeutic usage as local-anesthetic and anti-septic. Eugenol has also been found to reduce blood sugar levels in diabetics and I would suggest you do some research of your own on this last sentence.

Further research suggests that Dill oil, extracted from dill seeds has anti-spasmodic, carminative, digestive, and disinfectant, galactagogue (helps breast milk secretion), and sedative properties.

Fresh dill herb is an excellent source of antioxidant vitamin; vitamin-C. 100 grams contain about 85 mg or 140% of vitamin C. Vitamin-C helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful, pro-inflammatory free radicals.

Many users of dill do not know that Dill weed is a good source of minerals like copper, potassium, calcium, manganese, iron, and magnesium. Copper is a cofactor for many vital enzymes, including cytochrome c-oxidase and superoxide dismutase (other minerals function as cofactors for this enzyme are manganese and zinc).

The list goes on and on and I wonder why more people are not putting this great little health provider into their diets or at least into their foods.



Zinc is a co-factor in many enzymes that regulate growth and development, sperm generation, digestion and nucleic acid synthesis. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps control heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.

Further research shows that the Dill herb has all the characters to consider it has one of the most valuable functional foods. 100 grams of dill weed provides only 43 calories, but its phyto-nutrients profile is no less than any other high-calorie food source; be it nuts, pulses, cereals, or meat group.

Dill is easy to grow and though we have gotten away from kitchen gardens one can easily grow a pot of it on their patio as long as it is in a sunny location and just remember to water it once in awhile.



At Home Farm we use it to enhance the flavor and taste of vegetables, chicken, fish and meat dishes and we love throwing some into our potato salad in the summer. When we make cucumbers and sliced onions with sour cream we always add some dill



Dill is great to add to sauces and freshly chopped and sautéed dill is a great addition to green salads. Of course everyone knows that Dill seeds are used in pickling.



At Home Farm Herbery when we harvest our Dill seeds we make sure the seeds that are to be used as spice and condiment release pleasant, sweet and slightly peppery flavor when rubbed between index and thumb fingers. That test is a sure sign of good Dill seeds.

When you are using fresh Dill make sure it is washed thoroughly in the water in order to remove sand and dirt and to rid off any residual pesticides. Of course at Home Farm Herbery we do not use any pesticides. However, we still do wash it. We add fresh Dill just before preparing recipes in order to keep the fragrance and aromatic flavor intact.



Yet there is a lot to be said for good, dried Dill weed and we keep a lot of it on hand throughout the winter for our own use and our Home Farm Herbery customers think it is pretty good also.

When you buy fresh Dill make sure you get Dill with vibrant green color sprigs, and firm stems. Avoid Dill with any kind of spoilage/bruises or yellowing. We whole heartily urge you to buy dill that has been grown using organic techniques since this will give you more assurance pesticide free, aromatic, as well as nutritious sprigs.

Once you get your fresh Dill weed home, store in the refrigerator keeping it in a zip pouch or wrapped in a slightly damp paper towel and use it as early as possible since it loses flavor and nutrients quickly if kept for longer periods.

If you like Dill flavored chips then take the time to make your own without all those chemicals that may well cause you health problems down the road. Try making your own Dill flavored chips with thinly slice potatoes, radishes, sweet potatoes and other kinds of veggies.

Check out our Dill weed at http://www.localharvest.org/dill-weed-C25313

While there you can search for our organic culinary Dill seed and even get our heirloom Dill seeds to plant your own patch of healthy Dill.

May the Creative Force be with you



Arlene Wright-Correll
 
 

Seed germination is quite simple… right?

Seed Germination

 

Seed germination is quite simple… right?  Usually it is. However, sometimes problems do occur and the problem is easy to describe.  Mostly someone says, “My seeds didn’t germinate”.   We test our seeds for proof of germination! Thus we know when we send them they have at least an 85% to a 99% proof of germination.  That means if you have 100 seeds anywhere from 85 to 99 of them will germinate.

 

There are many causes of poor seed germination.  Fortunately, most cause of poor germination is easily corrected.  Mother Nature produces a vast array of types of seeds.  All seeds have a couple of things in common that is needed for germination. They all need moisture and warmth.  The similarity stops here. 

 

Successful seed starting begins by knowing the ideal germination conditions for the specific seed you are trying to sprout.  Each see has an ideal soil temperature and moisture requirements for successful germination, some seeds like cool soils while other others need warm soil to sprout.  Some seeds like wet soil, while others need moist to slightly dry conditions.  Seed planting depth varies from seed to seed.  Some seeds need light to sprout, while others begin life under dark soil.

 

Seeds need moisture, NOT WATER! A little moisture is all that is needed.

 

So do some research on the particular seed you have decided to buy and are planting!

 

We have no control over the seed germination conditions and all seed sales are final.

 

Tips for Improving Seed Germination

 

Pre-soaking seeds prior to planting helps hard to sprout seeds.  This works well for bigger seeds and hard shelled seeds.  It softens the seed coat and helps moisture to reach the “nut” inside.

 

Nicking Seeds is a common practice for peas and hard shelled seeds.  It helps moisture to reach the “nut” inside.

 

Plastic mulch aids in raising the soil temperature to speed germination outdoors.  Black plastic works best, but must be removed before the seeds sprout.

 

Germination Mats raise the temperature in your seed trays.  They are the perfect indoor solution to improving seed germination and can have amazing results.

 

Home Farm Herbery

 

http://www.localharvest.org/store/M48630

 

 
 
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