Rainbow Ranch Farms

  (Pinon Hills, California)
Organic, free-range, pastured, grass-fed/finished, heritage-breeds,
[ Member listing ]

Next Home-Farm Event: Feb. 10th


   

Our next home-farm, event is scheduled for Sun. Feb. 10th. Gates open at 11:00 A.M. Please RSVP. 

 

   

 Rainbow Ranch Farms, Heritage -Breed, Pastured, Free-Range Poultry,is grown without any grains. No G.M.O's, and Gluten-Free!

 

Cattle pasture in the garden. Corn-Free, Soy-Free, G.M.O.-Free, Grain-Free Beef! www.rainbowranchfarms.blogspot.com

 

 After the last harvest of summer, cattle on home-farm, grazing it up.  Pictured, are old fashioned, Lowline Angus. They stand about 4' tall, and can weigh 1200lbs at maturity.     Heritage, and lowline breeds, are a great choice for the small farmer, looking to develop a sustainable, living system.    Beef is available in shares.  1/3rd of a beef:  80-90lbs of variety cuts: 1/3rd steaks, 1/3rd roasts, 1/3rd stew, ground and Kebab. Bones, liver, heart etc. are available.

 We grow seasonal produce and greens from saved, heirloom seeds, and certified organic seeds, without using any sprays,  pesticides, or herbicides.

As we harvest, the cattle, hogs, lambs, and poultry are free to pasture, and clear the area for the next planting.

 

Old fashioned, heritage-breed, livestock, pasture in the garden. www.rainbowranchfarms.blogspot.com

 We keep specific bird-breeds in each garden plot, for pest control. We are also bee keepers, and growers of a variety of valuable insects.

"Poisons, and toxic sprays are not acceptable", 

 


 

 
 

WHY EAT LOCAL? From Health to Money Matters

WHY EAT LOCAL? From Our friends at www.100milediet.org 

Here on www.LocalHarvest.org you will find the largest selection of farms, close to you. Please be sure to explore, what your local food providers are growing NOW!.

1. Taste the difference.

At a farmers’ market, most local produce has been picked inside of 24 hours. It comes to you ripe, fresh, and with its full flavor, unlike supermarket food that may have been picked weeks or months before. Close-to-home foods can also be bred for taste, rather than withstanding the abuse of shipping or industrial harvesting. Many of the foods we ate on the 100-Mile Diet were the best we’d ever had.

RRF Insert: Be sure that you are selecting produce from heirloom seeds, and not supporting the corporations who supply genetically modified or patented seeds to farmers.

2. Know what you’re eating.

Buying food today is complicated. What pesticides were used? Is that corn genetically modified? Was that chicken free range or did it grow up in a box? People who eat locally find it easier to get answers. Many build relationships with farmers whom they trust. And when in doubt, they can drive out to the farms and see for themselves.

RRF Insert: Not all famers have the time for visits, since farming takes most of the day, please be certain to be patient, gracious and understanding.

3. Meet your neighbors.

Local eating is social. Studies show that people shopping at farmers’ markets have 10 times more conversations than their counterparts at the supermarket. Join a community garden and you’ll actually meet the people you pass on the street.

RRF Insert: It does not need to be a farmers market, it could be a local food co-op, local C.S.A. or even a small specialty market that meets your needs.

4. Get in touch with the seasons.

When you eat locally, you eat what’s in season. You’ll remember that cherries are the taste of summer. Even in winter, comfort foods like squash soup and pancakes just make sense–a lot more sense than flavorless cherries from the other side of the world.

RRF Insert: Sometimes produce farmers grow foods in coolframe and/or greenhouse, they may offer some out of season fruits and vegetables, even during the out-of-season months. Some areas have a comlimentary climate, which allows for growing some fruits and vegetables, naturally, even during out-of-season.

 5. Discover new flavors.

Ever tried sunchokes? How about purslane, quail eggs, yerba mora, or tayberries? These are just a few of the new (to us) flavors we sampled over a year of local eating. Our local spot prawns, we learned, are tastier than popular tiger prawns. Even familiar foods were more interesting. Count the types of pear on offer at your supermarket. Maybe three? Small farms are keeping alive nearly 300 other varieties–while more than 2,000 more have been lost in our rush to sameness .

6. Explore your home.

Visiting local farms is a way to be a tourist on your own home turf, with plenty of stops for snacks.

7. Save the world.

A study in Iowa found that a regional diet consumed 17 times less oil and gas than a typical diet based on food shipped across the country. The ingredients for a typical British meal, sourced locally, traveled 66 times fewer “food miles.” Or we can just keep burning those fossil fuels and learn to live with global climate change, the fiercest hurricane seasons in history, wars over resources…

8. Support small farms.

We discovered that many people from all walks of life dream of working the land–maybe you do too. In areas with strong local markets, the family farm is reviving. That’s a whole lot better than the jobs at Wal-Mart and fast-food outlets that the globalized economy offers in North American towns.

9. Give back to the local economy.

A British study tracked how much of the money spent at a local food business stayed in the local economy, and how many times it was reinvested. The total value was almost twice the contribution of a dollar spent at a supermarket chain .

10. Be healthy.

Everyone wants to know whether the 100-Mile Diet worked as a weight-loss program. Well, yes, we lost a few pounds apiece. More importantly, though, we felt better than ever. We ate more vegetables and fewer processed products, sampled a wider variety of foods, and ate more fresh food at its nutritional peak. Eating from farmers’ markets and cooking from scratch, we never felt a need to count calories.

11. Create memories.

A friend of ours has a theory that a night spent making jam–or in his case, perogies–with friends will always be better a time than the latest Hollywood blockbuster. We’re convinced.

12. Have more fun while traveling.

Once you’re addicted to local eating, you’ll want to explore it wherever you go. On a trip to Mexico, earth-baked corn and hot-spiced sour oranges led us away from the resorts and into the small towns. Somewhere along the line, a mute magician gave us a free show over bowls of lime soup in a little cantina.

Click the link for the website and original article. http://100milediet.org/why-eat-local

We have a list of clean, reliable, friendly and responsible small family farms, meat growers, food co-op's, C.S.A's, produce growers, 100 mile market, custom pastured meat butcher shops etc. If you would like more information, feel free to contact us.

Health Benefits of Grass-Fed Products-Eat Wild!

Health Benefits of Grass-Fed Products

From our fiends at www.eatwild.com 

click here for the study data and for the entire article

http://www.eatwild.com/healthbenefits.htm

Meat, eggs, and dairy products from pastured animals are ideal for your health. Compared with commercial products, they offer you more "good" fats, and fewer "bad" fats. They are richer in antioxidants; including vitamins E, beta-carotene, and vitamin C. Furthermore, they do not contain traces of added hormones, antibiotics or other drugs.

Below is a summary of these important benefits. Following the summary is a list of news bulletins that provide additional reasons for finding a local provider of grass-fed food.

Original article with study data:

http://www.eatwild.com/healthbenefits.htm

Summary of Important Health Benefits of Grassfed Meats, Eggs and Dairy

Lower in Fat and Calories. There are a number of nutritional differences between the meat of pasture-raised and feedlot-raised animals. To begin with, meat from grass-fed cattle, sheep, and bison is lower in total fat. If the meat is very lean, it can have one third as much fat as a similar cut from a grain-fed animal. In fact, as you can see by the graph below, grass-fed beef can have the same amount of fat as skinless chicken breast, wild deer, or elk.[1] Research shows that lean beef actually lowers your "bad" LDL cholesterol levels.[2]

Grass fed Beef 4X higher in Vit.E.

Grass Fed Meats Improve fat Levels

ALA keeps breast cancer away

How much arsenic did you eat for Thanksgiving?

“Omega-6 is like a fat producing bomb...”

Take care of your heart! Eat whole milk dairy products from grass-fed cows. 

New term you need to know: “by-product feedstuffs”

Score Ten for Grass-Fed Beef

  1. Lower in total fat
  2. Higher in beta-carotene
  3. Higher in vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)
  4. Higher in the B-vitamins thiamin and riboflavin
  5. Higher in the minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium
  6. Higher in total omega-3s
  7. A healthier ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids (1.65 vs 4.84)
  8. Higher in CLA (cis-9 trans-11), a potential cancer fighter
  9. Higher in vaccenic acid (which can be transformed into CLA)
  10. Lower in the saturated fats linked with heart disease

Original article with study data:

http://www.eatwild.com/healthbenefits.htm

Eggs from pastured hens are far richer in vitamin D

The European Union refuses to buy U.S. chicken

Healthy Eggs:  What We Knew in 1932

Grass-fed Beef Clearly Superior, Says New German and Canadian study

Free Range Eggs Nutritionally Superior

  • 1/3 less cholesterol than commercial eggs
  • 1/4 less saturated fat
  • 2/3 more vitamin A
  • 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids
  • 7 times more beta carotene

Lambs raised on pasture are higher in protein, lower in fat

Original articel with study data:

http://www.eatwild.com/healthbenefits.htm

 
 

Lamb Tail Docking Inhumane, Cruel, Unnecessary

This is ugly, if you have a weak stomach, please do not read, how most lambs are treated before going to the dinner table.

Here is the complete and original article:

http://animalwelfaretaiwan.webs.com/sheepandlambs.htm

Before being slaughtered the infant lambs will have a number of horrific procedures carried out on them.

Remember: Always be certain that your lamb was humanely treated, before giving money to further the abuse of innocent animals, especially livestock that we use and grow for food. It is important to respect the life and harvest of all livestock.

At only a few days old all the male lambs will be castrated. Usually they will have an extremely tight plastic ring placed around their genitalia, this cuts off the blood supply and the reproductive organ subsequently withers and falls off. This is excruciatingly painful and is done with out pain killers or anesthetic. In older lambs the scrotum will be cut open and the testes extracted. This is all done to make the meat tenderer as well as to control the temperament of the child and accelerate his growth.

The babies will also have their ears tagged by piercing and under go “tail docking”, this is when the tail is either cut off or has an extremely tight plastic ring placed on it which like the castration causes the tail to shrivel and fall off. The docking is meant to prevent parasitic infections but there is little scientific evidence to suggest that it is effective.

Older sheep may also have their horns removed whilst the lambs will be disbudded. These are all agonizing and unnecessary operations often carried by non-expert staff with no sanitization or medication. Some young lambs are so terrorized by the castration that they subsequently go into shock and stop suckling, they eventually die from starvation beside their distraught mothers.

 
 

Temecula Farmers Market Vendors vs Farmers

A small farmers market, located in beautiful down town, old town Temecula. Sat. 8:00am - 12:30pm corner of 6th and front street.

Below you will find a list of  farmers, Ancillary retail re-sellers and artisan vendors. If you would like more details on what each vendor, farmer, re-seller and artisan actually do, offer or are permitted for, please contact the market manager or the California Department of Food and Agriculture.

760-728-7343

www.temeculafarmersmarket.com

 

 
 

Meat Lovers Can Now Grow Their Own Lamb

Meat Lovers Can Now "Grow Their Own Lamb"

 

by Tanya on  December 01, 2009 at 8:51 AM

 

Taking cue from growing vegetables for own consumption, a Brit farmer is offering a "Grow Your Own Lamb" service that allows meat lovers to see the animal being conceived, born, butchered and delivered to their door. Brett Varker from Rowhorne Farm in Exeter, Devon, charges customers 176 pounds to be "completely involved" in every stage of the lamb's life.

First they choose the parents of their lamb from six breeds of ewe and four breeds of ram.

The pair are then placed in a field and the buyer can watch them mate and return to witness the ewe giving birth.

And then they are allowed a monthly visit to see the lamb before it is slaughtered at six months old and delivered to their door.

"Many of us grow our own
vegetables but we're going a step further and helping people grow their own meat," the Daily Express quoted Brett, 48, as saying.

"Farming seems like a dark art to people these days, so we want to show them what is involved and how much we care for our animals.

"This is no petting zoo - it's about great quality meat," he added.

Source-ANI
TAN

 

For the original article, please click the link http://www.medindia.net/news/Meat-Lovers-Can-Now-Grow-Their-Lamb-Meat-61631-1.htm

 

 

 

 

 
 
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