Slow Life with Real Food

Eating and living mindfully by the beach

Lopez Island Farm

When I think of vacation, it usually goes something like this: sun, sunburn, sand, palm trees, margaritas, fish tacos, watermelon, swimming… you get the picture. When I describe to you the climate of our first vacation as a family, it’s like this: cold, windy, rainy, foggy, cold, cold, really cold… get it? Where, oh where did we go? The San Juan Islands, specifically Lopez Island, nestled in Puget Sound off of the coast of Washington State. Why, oh why did we go? To do something different. It was a different vacation, and a very welcomed one.

We stayed at an old farm house, complete with chickens (of course!) and two horses. We shared the place with a few of Guillermo’s college buddies and their children. We picked apples and made apple pie, we rode horses (or tried to), we ate a lot, we skipped rocks in the bay, we knitted, read, chatted, told stories, sat by the fire, and played with babies. One of the best things that we did was visit Bruce Dunlop at Lopez Island Farm.

The day was cold and rainy (surprised?), but extremely green and peaceful. We were greeted by a flock of sheep, some mating, near the drive leading to the farm. Bruce came out and we made our introductions. The farm is home to sheep and pigs, which are solely grass-fed year round. Bruce explained to us the exciting experiment he has of using the pigs (their waste) as natural fertilizer and seeing the incredible effect they have on the growing grass. He showed us a patch of pasture that the pigs had access to over four years ago. The patch was right next to a pig-free patch, which made the differences between the two strikingly obvious. The ‘piggy’ patch was a shocking green, as opposed to the common green color of the ‘non-piggy’ patch. County Extension Agents have been to Lopez Island Farm regularly to take soil samples and further investigate the benefits of piggy poop.

Bruce gave us the tour of the almost 100 year-old farm building, introduced us to last year’s runt pig affectionately named Piggy, and let a two year old boy sit on his tractor (the highlight of the boy’s vacation). We took a look inside his honor-system store, and decided to buy some sausage. Bruce was kind enough to give me a little leaf lard for my pie crust (move over, Crisco!).

All the while we were cold with red, runny noses. We had muddy shoes and wet jeans, and our hair (for those of us who have it) was plastered to our cold faces. Our hands were buried deep in our pockets, our hats pulled over our ears, and big smiles were on our faces. What a fun vacation!

Tags:
Bookmark:    add to del.icio.us del.icio.us   add to technorati Technorati   add to Digg Digg   add to Google Google   add to stumbleupon StumbleUpon
 
 
Comments:

The Chinese word for crisis is divided into two characters, one meaning danger and the other meaning opportunity.

Posted by gucci handbags on August 02, 2010 at 08:20 PM PDT #

The Chinese word for crisis is divided into two characters, one meaning danger and the other meaning opportunity.

Posted by gucci handbags on August 02, 2010 at 08:20 PM PDT #

Post a Comment:
  • HTML Syntax: NOT allowed

RSS feed for Slow Life with Real Food blog. Right-click, copy link and paste into your newsfeed reader

Calendar


Search


Navigation


Topics


Feeds


BlogRoll