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Author Topic: Increasing Nutritional Levels
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  increasenutrition
  Woodbridge
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Increasing Nutritional Levels    (Posted Wed, Jul 11 '07 at 08:00 UTC)

To my surprise nothing that is grown is based on the Nutritional content, WHY?
After years of attending meetings I find that No Agri U. has or is concern with the Nutritional contents of what is grown, is there anyone that checks there yield as to the content levels of nutrition?

David Deeds
 wvhaugen
 Ferndale
Re: Increasing Nutritional Levels    (Posted Wed, Aug 22 '07 at 10:20 UTC)

Here is a link to Organic NZ, a magazine from New Zealand. http://www.organicnz.org/page/organic-nz-magazine-2006
The September/October 2006 issue had an article called Priority One: How to get nutrition back into food crops (page 48). Dr. Arden Andersen, listed as a soil scientist and GP, explains work by Albrecht (Cation Exchange System) and Reams (water soluble testing system). Perhaps you could get a copy at your local library. I happened to chance on it through a fellow agriculturist who has a link to New Zealand. The article mentioned the Albrecht system's basis in Missouri soils in the 1940's and why he favors Ream's adaptation of Morgan's soil testing method developed at the University of Connecticut. There is a lot of dense material in the article. In the same context, I went to a workshop in April on Sustainable Soil Culture and the presenter explained how to interpret the cation saturation on a soil analysis report. His method is to "fill up the cation box" with 65-80% calcium, 3-8% potassium, 10-15% magnesium, sodium 0-5% and hydrogen and trace elements to bring it up to 100%. These are the same numbers as the Albrecht system. The upshot is using cation saturation as a method, but still having to figure out how to interpret the readings, based on your theoretical model. Of course, this is all reductionist, chemistry-paradigm thinking. Good luck.

Catering to the unique Ferndale perspective.
 increasenutrition
 Woodbridge
Re: Increasing Nutritional Levels    (Posted Thu, Aug 23 '07 at 02:40 UTC)

Thank you for your input. The discussion about soil is good, however soil is not needed to max out the nutritional level of any crop grown. It's what is applied during planting. I've discovered an all natural balance solution that eliminates or reduces ferz. by about 80%+. The Dr. who has perfected this all natural balance solution isn't selling this at this time. He's waiting to file his patients and raise funds to be able to put on the market.

David Deeds
 abersacres
 Kennedy
Re: Increasing Nutritional Levels    (Posted Tue, Dec 4 '07 at 11:30 UTC)

Measuring brix levels of plant sap can be an effective way of measuring nutrient density of a particular crop. Dr.Arden Andersen's book "Life and Energy in Agriculture", has an excellent chart on optimal brix levels for particular crops. Also plant tissue testing or leaf analysis can be of help also in determining nutrient deficiencies and excesses. Biological farming methods and principles are based producing nutreint dense crops that are healthy enough to resist insects and diseases.

Retail farm markets, organic, seasonal, small fruits, vegetables, local goods, pastured eggs, Pick Your Own operation.
 Farmer Dell
 Lancaster Pa
Re: Increasing Nutritional Levels    (Posted Wed, Dec 5 '07 at 05:01 UTC)

Too often we look to Organics as the abstance of chemicals. I feel this this short sighted and we are missing the point. Organics need to be lifted as the modle for health. All plant health comes from the soil, if at first we don't have our soils built, we can use organic foliar feeding aplications, to raise the brix level in crops. Currently Dr Andersen is working in California, to develope a method to measure fruit health. Currently a few other countrys have a minium brix rateing to be sold as organic( In addition to the abstance of Chemical) We also need to be careful not to just look at brix rating, but rather use that as one rating. This past summer I tasted cherries from 2 diffrent orchards, the orchard with the highest brixs, had less flavor. I questioned the growers on their methods, and the orchard with the higher brixs used nitrogen at the right time to raise the brixs, but that did nothing for the flavor.

Organic- not the absence of chemicals, but the Presence of health Dell
 Farmer Dell
 Lancaster Pa
Re: Increasing Nutritional Levels    (Posted Sat, Dec 8 '07 at 05:46 UTC)

Heres a link to an interresting article
http://www.westonaprice.org/farming/nutrient-dense.html

Organic- not the absence of chemicals, but the Presence of health Dell
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