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Author Topic: goat information
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  farmer.boy
  Huntsville
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goat information    (Posted Fri, Dec 18 '09 at 08:39 UTC)

We had quite a crop of young billies born in the last few weeks. 8 out of 12 and then another one this week. After studying about it I decided to use the rubber band method to wether them. On one of them I put the band up a little too high and it pinched his false nipple. He was pretty miserable. He would cry, try to sit down then get up and try to walk. After we saw what happened we cut it off and re applied a new band and he was fine. All lthe others are doing fine. Boy are baby goats cute!
This week I was reading an article online and it said the band was a bed technique because the kids would often be hurt by it. They would cry and be unable to walk. Obviously someone had done it wrong like I had done and had concluded the technique was bad. This is so typical of the information on the internet. Anyone can put anything online and appear correct and authoritive. There is no one to challenge or refute the forums. Misinformation is disseminated so quickly and become common mis-knowledge. Take what you read with a grain of salt. Or maybe even a teaspoon of salt.
Blessings,
Stanley

 Old Soul Farmer
 Ann Arbor
Re: goat information    (Posted Sat, Dec 19 '09 at 07:22 UTC)

Thanks for posting this Stanley - we also raise goats (Boers) but haven't wethered any yet. I was hoping to sell them for breeding stock but didn't get them advertised in time - or so I thought. I talked with a butcher shop and he said they slaughter at 2 - 3 yrs. old. I had heard that buck meat at that age would be tainted by the homones (taste off). Ours are now about 8 1/2 months old so I thought we should either sell or butcher. What's your experience with this?

 farmer.boy
 Huntsville
Re: goat information    (Posted Sat, Dec 19 '09 at 09:21 UTC)

This is our first year with a goat herd. I am amazed at how personerable they are. My children love them all and protest when I announce a plan to sell any of them. I see goat of varying ages sold for slaughter in the sale barn report. Nannies and billies and wethers. They all seem to be sold for eating. We have a good ethnic population nearby and I am sure I will have no problem selling our older intact billies or our younger wethers or nannies. $1/lb for live weight seems to be the going rate. All I have to do is get past my daughter's sad looks. We have a local custom butcher that does a good job so that is a plus for us. He charges $35 to provide just a carcass or $50 to cut it all up.
Our older billy is very docile and doesn't really smell bad either. As delicately as I can I will say maybe someone didn't do a through job trying to band him and he is only "half a billy". I wonder if that helps out with his smell and behavior. Yet he is viral enough to yield 20 or 30 kids per year.

Blessings,
Stanley

 dunlooken
 Glencoe
Re: goat information    (Posted Mon, Dec 21 '09 at 12:58 UTC)

I've been raising, breeding, showing dairy goats for 28 years so maybe I can be of some help.
Banding, is, IMHO, the best way to wether but you do have to be careful of those teats!
Goat can be sold for meat at many ages. Some people like the young kids at 18 to 30 pounds while some like them bigger. With Boers you'll probably want to wait until at least 60 pounds with 90 to 110 being a better size. Dairy bucks are usually better at 30 to 80 pounds.
Some ethnic groups like old bucks, the ranker the better. Some do not like to eat does at all. With a little work you can find someone who wants to eat anything at any time though I do find that most ethnic groups prefer intact males.
Some aged bucks are just stinkier than others. If a buck has been disbudded he may have also been descented. There are scent glands just behind the horns and they can be burnt when you burn horn buds. Some does do not like bucks that don't smell. The manners a buck shows or doesn't show are usually the result of how he's been handled since a kid.
If you want to raise wethers for pets or for working harness or pack goats you'll want to wait a bit to neuter them as they need time for their urinary tract to grow and mature before you take away the hormones.
If you are trying to raise goats and become annimal welfare approved they want you to wether all buck kids at a very young age. Or at least they did the last time I checked. We don't wether anything before 4 or 5 months and only then if they are being sold as a pet.
If I can be of any more help, just ask.

Bev
 Billys Boers
 Westminster
Re: goat information    (Posted Mon, Dec 21 '09 at 06:31 UTC)

IHello Fellow Goat Ranchers!

In reference to harvesting and promoting Goat Meat: We have been extremely active in both for the past year.

We purchased our first Meat Goats nearly 4 years ago. During the past 12 months, have harvested over 80 goats and sold just a few as whole cabritos, the rest of them as "Special Cuts" via Farmers Markets and a couple of small family owned stores that focus on Locally Grown products. It has been our quest to introduce health focuced, main stream Americans to the benefits and flavor of Goat Meat. Personally, we do not like the "Robust" flavor of Buck meat, nor do we enjoy the tough, stringy texture of old cull does, they are best turned into ground and/or sausage.

Originally, we banded before they were 6 weeks old, however, we have discovered that the bucks will grow better if left intact, you have to make certain to cut or band them around 4 to 5 months of age or you will end up with "robust" flavor meat. The small bander will not work at the older age, we use the Elastrator from No Bull Enterprises on the larger goats or harvest them if they have reached at least 80 pounds. Time of year will also dictate when, how , and If due to flies, etc. Our ideal weight to harvest for select cuts and to make the cost worth while is over 100 pounds, but, less than 1 year of age. You will yield approx 1/3 of the live weight back in special cuts. A good quality meat goat should have a hang weight of no less than 50% of it's live weight.


If you have sub standard meat goats, or dairy mix, you may never reach that weight, in that case, you are better to sell them at auction and invest in better genetics. It took a lot of time, effort, samples, and faith to get the ball rolling these past few years and now our sales stay pretty steady. In fact, we are completely out of goats to harvest until next summer. We took our last few into the processor and I anticipate the inventory will be gone by the end of January.


While it is true that certain groups of people like the Robust Buck flavor, most do not. Personally, I think it is absolutly horrible! However, we are looking into making raw pet food with it.

We even pick up our scarps ffrom the processor for our LGD's and have some of the hide's processed a a local tannery.

Additionally, the Italian Sausage and Ground Goat have been our #1 sellers, followed by boneless stew meat and leg roast. The leg roast range between 1.25 and 2.50 lbs. each and are wonderful in the slow cooker. We mix the Italian Sausage and Ground to make burger patties and they are requested everywhere we go to BBQ!

I sincerely urge all you meat goat producers to promote your product. Don't sell youself short by taking them to the auction for $1.00 lb. on the hoof. Yes, it takes some effort and passion, but it will sell for you if you get it out there. Just be certain to check with your state meat inspection office to see what the requirements are. Here in SC, I use two different processors, one is USDA inspected and the other is State inspected. How many of you have tried your own product?

I hope this helps answer some of your questions.

Billys Goat Hill Farm, LLC Natural Chevon, Goat Meat and Cabrito Meat
 M. R. Goats
 Worthington
Re: goat information    (Posted Mon, Aug 2 '10 at 10:00 UTC)

Does anyone have any advise on getting your goat meat USDA Labeled and inspected for your farm?
We are located in West Virginia, and are having a hard time figuring out how to sell our goat meat packaged.

Thanks
Lorie

M. R. Goats

M. R. Goats
 deluxelady
 Mountain Home
Re: goat information    (Posted Sun, Aug 15 '10 at 01:55 UTC)

I just banded my 3 1/2 month old nubian buck with wonderful results. This was my first time banding and the process went smoothly. I secured the goat in the stanchion and while he was eating I slipped the band on making sure the nipples were not caught. I found it easier to do since the goat was hanging naturally and I could see more easily where to place the band. I sprayed the band daily with an iodine solution made for animals. After about a month they were hanging by a thread which I proceeded to cut loose. He has completely healed and is none the wiser. I have had the cutting method demonstrated to me but was not as confident in performing this procedure alone. Just be sure to check the band daily, especially in hot weather such as I had. They can quickly become infected. I would not hesitate to do this procedure again.

 L'il Farmer
 Big Lake, MN
Re: goat information    (Posted Sat, Jan 1 '11 at 07:32 UTC)

Do I want to know what a false nipple is?

Grandma's Garden, naturally raised veggies, herbs and cut flowers.
 farmer.boy
 Huntsville
Re: goat information    (Posted Sun, Jan 2 '11 at 05:59 UTC)

Males - humans included - have false nipples.Two of them usually. They are called that because that is what they are.

 L'il Farmer
 Big Lake, MN
Re: goat information    (Posted Mon, Jan 17 '11 at 05:20 UTC)

That kind of blows my mind. Cows, horses and other ungulates don't have those. sure cats, dogs and people do.

Grandma's Garden, naturally raised veggies, herbs and cut flowers.
 dunlooken
 Glencoe
Re: goat information    (Posted Tue, Jan 18 '11 at 08:37 UTC)

Cows, horses, and all male mammals have nipples. They're just hard to see on larger mammals.

Bev
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