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Author Topic: Corriente and when is a cow too old to butcher?
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  SanYsidroFarms
  Fredericksburg
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Corriente and when is a cow too old to butcher?    (Posted Sat, Jan 15 '11 at 11:06 UTC)

Greetings all,

To briefly introduce my self I a Michael Green of San Ysidro Farms in Fredericksburg VA.
I run a 40 plus member CSA and am expanding into grass fed beef production and free range/organic eggs. I hope to some day get a small dairy share going for our CSA as well.
I have two questions. One is does anyone have any advice or thoughts on Corriente cattle. I am having two delivered tuesday to add to my herd of one Hereford steer (10 months age ) and one Angus heifer (also ten months).
One Corriente is an eight month old Corriente bull with horns. the other is a six year old cow.
Aside from general thoughts on that breed I am wondering how old a cow/steer can be before they are too old to butcher for edible meat. The six year old female was purchased with butchering in mind come late spring.
Thanks in advance for any input you may have.

King and Queen County Virginia Based CSA serving the local area, Ashland Fredericksburg and Richmond with fresh produce, quality meats and more grown in the organic fashion.
 matmid2001
 Coleman
Re: Corriente and when is a cow too old to butcher?    (Posted Wed, Jan 19 '11 at 12:12 UTC)Positive Rank

At 6 yrs your cow will yield mediocre beef. It would be best to have it made into ground beef. Also per the USDA, after 3 yrs of age, all nerve tissue has to be removed from the meat, due to BSE, or Mad Cow disease.
You will also want to separate the bull from the steer, or the bull will fight with, and possibly injure the steer.
If your bull breeds with any of females, you will not enjoy eating it, as the male hormones will give the meat an off flavor. Bulls used for breeding are generally used to make bologna and hot dogs when they are butchered.

Matt Middleton
 SanYsidroFarms
 Fredericksburg
Re: Corriente and when is a cow too old to butcher?    (Posted Wed, Jan 19 '11 at 12:21 UTC)

Okay, well I'm learning, but this is a little disheartening. I was told that the young bull and steer wouldn't be too much of a problem together. Will they be prone to fight only when there is a female in heat or at all times? Is their interest in fighting just normal male bravado or is it because the one is a steer and the other a hormonal bull? They are approximately the same age at just under a year.
I have worked on farms where there was multiple steers together so I take it that your saying basically a bull cannot be around steers at all?
I appreciate your advice. Thanks.

King and Queen County Virginia Based CSA serving the local area, Ashland Fredericksburg and Richmond with fresh produce, quality meats and more grown in the organic fashion.
 cattlecait
Re: Corriente and when is a cow too old to butcher?    (Posted Wed, Jan 19 '11 at 09:22 UTC)

Corriente aren't typically good beef animals. They're quite light muscled and don't have a very good carcass quality, they'll also take quite awhile to grow to a decent butcher weight. You might find a nice market for them as roping cattle but I've never heard of anyone raising them solely for beef. The other poster is right about the bull.

 SanYsidroFarms
 Fredericksburg
Re: Corriente and when is a cow too old to butcher?    (Posted Thu, Jan 20 '11 at 03:06 UTC)

The young bull and the older cow arrived today. Every one seems to be getting along. As of now the new crew seems to be sticking to themselves and I don't blame them since our two gelding and a little pony seem to be plenty eager to exemplify the pecking order around here.
I have hopes for the big momma though because she had the guts to try and run me down. Of course I stood my ground and actually play charged right back at her and that was fun. The young bull hangs around here and so far the other two cattle are interested but not so bothered that they feel like they need to follow the new arrivals around.
I feel ridiculous but to be honest we don't have a steer. Yes we've had the other two cows a while but I just never really looked. Last night though in anticipation of the arrival and after having read the above statement about the bull and steer not getting along I sorta looked a bit closer.
I soon realized there was definitely something missing from the picture so I am relieved to find that I have a Hereford heifer not a Hereford steer. Damn do I feel silly. I was told he was a steer when I bought them , had reason to doubt it and never really noticed!
You learn something new everyday.
Still i hope that the beef will be passable when that day does come but I really am in no rush. I just like having the beautiful things around. Speaking of learning something new the guy shows up with the new bull and says yeah he's Corriente / Jersey cross. So there we have it. The dynamics have changed over at San Ysidro Farms.
Thanks for everyones input.
Did you mean CattleCait that he was right about the bull with regards to his taste after he's bred or about him not getting along with a steer had the Hereford actually been one.
It'll be nice to know because if that's the case I'll be sure to steer clear of steers now that we do have the young bull. - M

King and Queen County Virginia Based CSA serving the local area, Ashland Fredericksburg and Richmond with fresh produce, quality meats and more grown in the organic fashion.
 SanYsidroFarms
 Fredericksburg
Re: Corriente and when is a cow too old to butcher?    (Posted Thu, Jan 20 '11 at 03:08 UTC)

The young bull and the older cow arrived today. Every one seems to be getting along. As of now the new crew seems to be sticking to themselves and I don't blame them since our two gelding and a little pony seem to be plenty eager to exemplify the pecking order around here.
I have hopes for the big momma though because she had the guts to try and run me down. Of course I stood my ground and actually play charged right back at her and that was fun. The young bull hangs around here and so far the other two cattle are interested but not so bothered that they feel like they need to follow the new arrivals around.
I feel ridiculous but to be honest we don't have a steer. Yes we've had the other two cows a while but I just never really looked. Last night though in anticipation of the arrival and after having read the above statement about the bull and steer not getting along I sorta looked a bit closer.
I soon realized there was definitely something missing from the picture so I am relieved to find that I have a Hereford heifer not a Hereford steer. Damn do I feel silly. I was told he was a steer when I bought them , had reason to doubt it and never really noticed!
You learn something new everyday.
Still i hope that the beef will be passable when that day does come but I really am in no rush. I just like having the beautiful things around. Speaking of learning something new the guy shows up with the new bull and says yeah he's Corriente / Jersey cross. So there we have it. The dynamics have changed over at San Ysidro Farms.
Thanks for everyones input.
Did you mean CattleCait that he was right about the bull with regards to his taste after he's bred or about him not getting along with a steer had the Hereford actually been one.
It'll be nice to know because if that's the case I'll be sure to steer clear of steers now that we do have the young bull. - M

King and Queen County Virginia Based CSA serving the local area, Ashland Fredericksburg and Richmond with fresh produce, quality meats and more grown in the organic fashion.
 CowLady
 New Auburn
Re: Corriente and when is a cow too old to butcher?    (Posted Sat, Nov 19 '11 at 07:02 UTC)

How are they getting along? Corriente are not known for their meat, they are raised for roping cattle. They may get along fine. Depends on the size, I have bulls and steers together all the time, and the steers always know who the top dog (BULL) is and they stay out of their way. Cattle are herd animals and need to be together to properly thrive. The bull meat will not be as good if he has been breeding or not. Definitely taints the flavor if he is breeding, but still will not be as good as the steer even if he is not. You can butcher them at any age - but he older they get (after 20 months) the quality of cuts of meat will go down. Older animals will be fine hamburger or bologna. The younger animal can be fine for typical cuts. Corriente do not develop much fat on the outer part of their body, and they do not have much marbeling in the meat, that is why they are not typically raised for meat.

Ranching Cattle Since 1982
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