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Author Topic: Torn horn?
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  cassidy
  Berthoud
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Torn horn?    (Posted Sat, Mar 26 '11 at 09:04 UTC)

i don't know how else to phrase this, but one of our ram lambs got one of his horns caught on something and he almost has torn it off. There has been some bleeding and it is crusting onto his head and ear. my husband tried to cut the horn off with a scalpel so that it would be a clean cut, we could put some betadyne on it, and let it heal for him.

It seemed to bleed, and we stopped cutting. it's torn right at the base of the horn, on his head. My husband is trying to cut it there. I had thought maybe cutting the horn off higher up, away from his head, would just help it not get caught on things and heal on its own.

any ideas of how to handle this? The horn is completely pointing in a different direction than the other horn, so he had a significant tear on his head. poor little guy!

 Angela
 Conway
Re: Torn horn?    (Posted Sat, Mar 26 '11 at 09:30 UTC)

Veterinarian.

I have my livestock de-horned regularly. Not so much goats, but all cattle. It's a simple procedure, and he'll heal quickly. Not expensive either.

Good luck

Angela G Stanley Rockgate Farm
 cassidy
 Berthoud
Re: Torn horn?    (Posted Sat, Mar 26 '11 at 10:19 UTC)

It was too late to call her, but I can call her in the morning. We raise lambs until they are 6 months old - some of them never really grow horns, we never know until they are 2-3 months old if they are going to or not.

My neighbor de-horns her goats when they are kids, she does it because 4H requires it for showing, but she hates it. It seems cruel and really painful - basically burning off the horn buds from their heads. I don't know if I want to do it on a regular basis for lambs that go to market at 6 months - and this it the first time anyone has damaged a horn, and we don't even know what he got it caught on, still trying to figure that out.

Thanks, though...I assumed this would require a pro (my husband never wants to call the vet!). i am so afraid of him bleeding to death at the hands of my husband!

 Angela
 Conway
Re: Torn horn?    (Posted Sat, Mar 26 '11 at 10:22 UTC)

It is cruel I think, but necessary with cattle. For safety's sake.

Yes, the animals horn has been damaged, so it needs to be seen to by a professional. There's actually more to it then just cutting them off. There is some type of membrane that has to be removed. Then the wound is chemically cauterized.

Again, it's not expensive, and could save the little one's life.

Angela G Stanley Rockgate Farm
 cassidy
 Berthoud
Re: Torn horn?    (Posted Sat, Mar 26 '11 at 10:30 UTC)

Yeah, thanks. If I raised cattle I'd probably do it, too - you raise them longer, and they can get stuck in fences, and from the one little steer i raised - he got ornery and could have hurt ME with those stupid horns of his! but a 100 lb ram lamb, they usually don't grow too big a set of horns, this guy has a particulary curvy set, still not sure what he got it stuck on. I'm waiting on a call back from my vet. She's pretty reasonable and will do a good job.

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