What is Enough?

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If you'd like to share your thoughts on our "What is Enough?" newsletter, please do so here. We'd love to hear what you think!

By: | Dec 17, 2012 11:17 AM | Permalink
I love gardening. But this summer when I planted, I had no idea that I would not have enough time for it. When my daughter was diagnosed in July...I wanted more time with her, more time for me in my garden...I had to spread my time between...my garden was my "stress haven". It is nearly winter now and I don't have much to show for my gardening efforts..but I hope now..for me...I am hoping for "more time" with her. Happy Holidays

By: Heidi Arnold | Dec 3, 2012 05:50 PM | Permalink
I seem to be bumping into the idea of "enough" more than usual lately. This was on facebook recently - thought you might like it: http://www.bobperks.com/wish.htm

By: Helen Aardsma | Dec 1, 2012 02:28 PM | Permalink
This reminder is very badly needed in our insane culture. Godliness with contentment is great gain! In our home and on our farm that means we live with eternity in mind and are content with basic food and clothing and we are RICH in the things that really count. Keep up your great work! Blessings, Helen a proud member of LocalHarvest!

By: Angela Murphy | Nov 30, 2012 02:12 PM | Permalink

By: Lisa Hall | Nov 30, 2012 10:53 AM | Permalink
Thank you for reminding us about what's really important in this life -- many people only come to this conclusion after the loss of a loved one or other equally devastating event. My husband and I try very hard to live our lives "with no guilt", meaning we try to do the right thing to start with so we don't have to later say "I should have done..." or "I wish we had spent time with...". Wouldn't it be nice if more people felt this way, and acted less selfishly?

By: | Nov 30, 2012 03:01 AM | Permalink
Erin, Such an insightful commentary on how the immediate can sometimes take precedence over the important. Thank you for putting things into perspective during this time of year when our perception of what is important is skewed by the holiday hype. Important...faith, family and friends, an attitude of gratitude and especially at this time of year when indulgence is the norm, moderation in all things (even gardening!) :)

By: | Nov 30, 2012 03:00 AM | Permalink
Erin, Such an insightful commentary on how the immediate can sometimes take precedence over the important. Thank you for putting things into perspective during this time of year when our perception of what is important is skewed by the holiday hype. Important...faith, family and friends, an attitude of gratitude and especially at this time of year when indulgence is the norm, moderation in all things (even gardening!) :)

By: | Nov 29, 2012 11:57 PM | Permalink
ps-I live in Boston, MA. I'd really like to be able to learn. Maybe provide some chopping, or whatever, in exchange for learning?

By: | Nov 29, 2012 11:54 PM | Permalink
I wish that my grandmother had taught me the skill of canning. I live in elderly and disabled housing. Farmers markets are very expensive. I do grow some herbs, and scallions(green onions).

If you offer canning classes that are relatively cheap, people that do not have gardens, or do not have the skills would be able to learn how to preserve foods.

If you advertise small classes at elderly or disabled housing, you may find people that know about canning, but no longer thave the equipment.

Classes offered to people that use food pantries, if possible, would be very welcome, I'm sure.

Perhaps it could be a community project, or a store that has the supplies could provide them at a discount or free.

Karen DeGuire says:    (Nov 30, 2012 12:00 AM)

Here in Northern CA, the extension office offers a Master Preserver class for free. The Master Preservers then offer classes in the spring and summer. It's a great program. Unfortunately, I don't know if other states offer the same type of program.

Karen DeGuire says:    (Nov 30, 2012 12:00 AM)

Here in Northern CA, the extension office offers a Master Preserver class for free. The Master Preservers then offer classes in the spring and summer. It's a great program. Unfortunately, I don't know if other states offer the same type of program.

By: linda lewallen | Nov 29, 2012 11:04 PM | Permalink
I so enjoy hearing about your excesses in the garden and preserving your bounty. It beats hearing my nice's escapades buying $1500 pairs of shoes!!

Thanks for a healthy prospective that I shall continue to try to instill in my family members.

By: Arlene Wright-Correll | Nov 29, 2012 10:28 PM | Permalink
Excellent newsletter and you have hit the nail on the head. I get crazy when the seed catalog comes in and even one package of tomato seeds produce more plants in our greenhouse than this family of 2 need even with giving produce to our daughter and son-in-law who live on the farm compound.

My solution to a whole greenhouse of plants from any kind of seed it to take them to our local farmer's market 2 day a week until they are all sold which is pretty fast since our prices are cheaper than the local garden centers and the proceeds go to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

Plus every little kids that comes to Home Farm Herbery's farmer's market stall gets an opportunity to choose and take home a free veggie plant and they often come back later in the season telling me what they grew. This is a great way to get kids interested in farming or gardening even on a very small scale.

So even when the urge gets to plant more just remember that someone out there has a food bank that can use your extra produce.

Sharing is really what life is all about simply because whatever you send out there comes back many times over.

Tread the Earth Lightly,

Arlene Wright-Correll Home Farm Herbery

says:    (Nov 30, 2012 12:00 AM)

What a wonderful, educating, giving way of life! Thank you

By: Brian & Lindy Ferguson | Nov 29, 2012 08:58 PM | Permalink
Good news letter! Yes enough is good! This year the way I mean that is all the food I make say at Thanksgiving and it is just TOO much, food, time, leftovers,,,well this year finally I slowed down and made less and we all were still full and happy and what wasn't made remains well kept for the next meal!....and the best part was I had lots of time to enjoy my family and the parade! Happy Thanksgiving to all!!

By: | Nov 29, 2012 07:52 PM | Permalink
What an interesting newsletter. I could picture you and even myself living out there and doing this work. Thank you so much. Nanny McQuinn-SW FL

By: Conni Schaftenaar | Nov 29, 2012 07:31 PM | Permalink
I could have written the news post you just shared, Erin . . . too much time spent in and on the garden and it's output and I've been recently reflecting about the waste of some produce not completely used up or given away or fed to the hogs and chickens - it's crazy-making! I have made a similar vow to cut back on the garden next year. I also got to go camping ONCE this entire summer, partly because of the garden commitment.

By: Chane Roghair | Nov 29, 2012 06:54 PM | Permalink
Thank you so much for the encouragement to say to ourselves we have enough. When we are satisfied, we are content to say we have enough. We reap the fruit of love, joy, peace, patience, self control and more. Character qualities we can grow.
says:    (Nov 30, 2012 12:00 AM)

Great article!! I just wish our farmers market had more organic produce for sale. Who wants to poison themselves with produce that has toxins from nonorganic foods?????


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